南京桑拿

Photo library: Business and industry 27

first_img{loadposition tc}Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.» Download Business & Industry contact sheet (1.8MB) » Download full image library contact sheet (10.5MB) Carletonville, North West province: The headgear at Tau Tona Gold Mine, part of mining multinational AngloGold Ashanti’s west Witswatersrand operations. Photo: Anglogold Ashanti » Download high-res image Carletonville, North West province: A drill rig in operation underground at mining multinational Anglogold Ashanti’s Mponeng Mine. Photo: Anglogold Ashanti » Download high-res image Carletonville, North West province: Mining multinational Anglogold Ashanti’s Savuka Gold Mine. Photo: Anglogold Ashanti » Download high-res image Carletonville, North West province: Tau Tona Gold Mine, part of mining multinational AngloGold Ashanti’s west Witswatersrand operations. Photo: Anglogold Ashanti » Download high-res image Carletonville, North West province: Mining multinational Anglogold Ashanti’s Savuka Gold Mine. Photo: Anglogold Ashanti » Download high-res image Carletonville, North West province: Mining multinational Anglogold Ashanti’s Mponeng Mine. Photo: Anglogold Ashanti » Download high-res image BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY 27: {loadposition business}Having trouble downloading high-resolution images? Queries about the image library? Email Janine Erasmus at [email protected]last_img read more

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South Africa wins award for fight against malaria

first_img1 February 2016South Africa is one of 14 African countries to have received recognition for its fight against malaria during the 2016 African Leaders Malaria Alliance (Alma) meeting on 30 January as part of the 26th African Union Summit in Ethiopia.The 2016 Alma Awards for Excellence were given to:Botswana, Cape Verde, Eritrea, Namibia, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, South Africa, and Swaziland for achieving the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) target for malaria;Rwanda, Senegal and Liberia for Performance in Malaria Control between 2011 and 2015;Mali, Guinea and Comoros for being the Most Improved in Malaria Control between 2011 and 2015.“These are impressive achievements,” said United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. “They are a result of your vision of a malaria-free world.”These stats from the Alma shows where Africa is gaining ground in the fight against malaria. The green indicates a country on track, yellow indicates progress but more effort required while red shows countries that are not on track in the fight against malaria. (Image: Alma)South Africa’s progressIn South Africa, cases of malaria have decreased by 82%; and the malaria related death rate has dropped by 71% since the year 2000 to date.The decrease is attributed to a sound malaria vector control programme, in which the country has used dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane or DDT odourless insecticide for indoor residual spraying, coupled with other World Health Organization recommended interventions.“We are honoured to receive this 2016 Alma Award, which recognises the efforts that our programme in South Africa has made, not only in the past decade, but also investments we have made to fight malaria since the 1940s,” said President Jacob Zuma, who received the award.Collective effortSince 2000, malaria mortality rates in Africa had fallen by 66% overall and 71% among children under the age of five, said the alliance.“The African Leaders Malaria Alliance is a model for what we can do when we commit ourselves to a collective goal,” noted Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf.“Our progress is undeniable. This is what it looks like when we work together – this is how we build a better future for Africa.”Challenge continues“Despite the remarkable achievements, we should not lose sight that malaria remains a disease of poverty and a major public health concern, particularly in Africa,” said Hailemariam Dessalegn, Ethiopia’s prime minister and the current chair of Alma. “We must therefore continue to invest in malaria interventions in order to reduce malaria cases and deaths.”According to the organisation, there were 188 million case of malaria in Africa in 2015. “An African child still dies every two minutes from the disease,” it said.To see how each country fared, click here to read the 2015 fourth quarter report.Source: SouthAfrica.info reporterlast_img read more

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Prakash Padukone to mentor Saina Nehwal for Asian Games

first_imgSaina NehwalThe Prakash Padukone Badminton Academy on Tuesday clarified that Saina Nehwal will be training at the academy for two weeks purely as part of her preparations for the Asian Games to be held in Incheon, South Korea later this month.The PPBA, in a press release here, tacitly rejected the reported “split” between Saina and her long-time coach Pullela Gopichand as a reason for the badminton ace to train under former national coach Vimal Kumar who is attached to the PPBA run by former All-England champion and World No.1 Prakash Padukone.”This is to inform all Indian badminton fans that after discussion with national badminton coach, Gopichand and Saina, it has been decided that Saina will train with Vimal at Prakash Padukone Badminton Academy in Bangalore for two weeks as part of her training for the Asian Games” a statement by the PPBA said.”The presence of former World No.1 Prakash Padukone, who will play the role of a mentor, is bound to benefit Saina.””The Indian badminton fans would be well aware that over the years the hard work put in by Gopichand and Saina is responsible for her reaching the highest level of world badminton.””The proposed two-week stint in Bangalore is a continuation of the same process so that Saina can succeed at the highest level and continue to bring laurels for India, said”PPBA is one of the recognized BAI centres and it is always keen to make its contribution in enhancing the performance of the Indian players at the World level.”advertisementA section of the media had reported that Saina, who is going through a lean patch and Gopichand had parted ways and hence the 24-year-old former world No.2 and currently No.7 had decided to move from Hyderabad to Bangalore.On her arrival here on Tuesday, Saina categorically stated that Gopichand was still her coach and that her move to Bangalore was merely a change which will also help her prepare for the Asian Games.”Gopi sir, myself and Vimal sir had discussions and after that, I decided to come to Bangalore for training for two weeks. It will be a change for me and also help my preparations for the Asian Games,” said Saina.last_img read more

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Iowa Releases “See You In Pasadena” Rose Bowl Hype Video

first_imgAn exterior view of the Rose BowlRose BowlIt has been 25 years since Iowa last played in the Rose Bowl. The Hawkeyes will be back in Pasadena Jan. 1 to take on Stanford.Iowa fans are justifiably excited for the occasion, even if their team narrowly missed out on the College Football Playoff. This weekend, the Hawkeyes dropped a very cool “See You in Pasadena” hype video for the game, featuring highlights from this season and homage to the program’s past Rose Bowl squads.  Smelling roses #Hawkeyes @rosebowlgame https://t.co/JfihBC86PR— Hawkeye Football (@HawkeyeFootball) December 12, 2015Hawkeye fans, are you ready yet?last_img read more

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Messi Is Better Than Maradona But Maybe Not Pele

Last week I wrote “Lionel Messi Is Impossible,” an article that explored how play-by-play data sheds light on the Argentina forward’s skills, style and value (spoiler: he’s good). Many readers asked if I could do a similar analysis comparing Messi with all-time greats, particularly Argentine legend Diego Maradona (who played on the winning 1986 World Cup side) and Brazilian great Pele (who helped his country win the Cup in 1958, 1962 and 1970).Ask and you shall receive. Opta, the soccer analytics company, has compiled touch-by-touch data from World Cups going back to 1966, meaning all of Maradona’s World Cup tournaments and two of Pele’s have been logged. This gives us 21 Maradona and eight Pele games to analyze — certainly a small sample, but informative nonetheless.I’ll note before I begin that I’m not usually a fan of cross-era comparisons. Today’s athletes aren’t playing the same game as yesterday’s. Strategies, styles and even rules change dramatically from decade to decade, and in most sports other than horse racing, modern athletes would crush historical greats. It’s easy to think that the dominant players of the past would be just as effective as their modern counterparts with current training, conditioning, etc. — but I’m not buying it. Historical greats frequently dominated a smaller pool of players or excelled in an immature game. And there’s no guarantee that their previous success means they would respond well to modern training techniques or would fit into the modern game.1In other words, the correlation between a player’s skill relative to a previous era and the ability to port those skills into the modern era isn’t necessarily very strong.But cross-era comparisons can still be worthwhile when the circumstances are right. Those circumstances, from most to least useful:When the modern player is much more dominant than the historical player: That means the modern player is almost certainly better.When the modern player is a bit more dominant than the historical player: That means the modern player is probably better.When the historical player is much more dominant than the modern player: That means there’s some the chance the historical player was better.When the historical player is a little more dominant than the modern player: That’s not helpful in the slightest.The Messi vs. Maradona debate falls somewhere between Nos. 1 and 2. But Messi vs. Pele is somewhere between No. 3 and No. 4. Although we have only eight games in the data set, Pele’s fine-grained statistics over this sample are remarkable. And unlike Maradona, whose career production doesn’t quite match Messi’s (e.g., Maradona had 346 combined club and international goals in 679 career appearances, while Messi already has 407 goals in 548 appearances), Pele’s macro-level stats are formidable. While record-keeping wasn’t as good in the 1950s and ’60s, and there were all kinds of odd unofficial matches, Pele had at least 757 goals in 812 “official” matches — a higher goal-to-appearance ratio than Messi overall — and his peak seasons were even better. For example, in 1961 Pele scored 62 goals in 38 appearances (1.63 goals per appearance!) for Santos FC, the Brazilian club team where he spent most of his playing career.To make the fairest possible comparisons, I’ve used two sets of Messi games to isolate his World Cup play from his high-level club play. “Messi-A” is all of Messi’s games in the Opta data set for Argentina (get it? “A” is for Argentina) either in World Cup or World Cup qualifying play (so no international friendlies or the like), going back to 2006.2Note that 2014 alone would be considerably better than average for Messi-A, but we’re comparing all available data rather than cherry-picking each player’s best seasons. “Messi-B” is all of Messi’s games since the 2010-11 season that Opta covers for Barcelona (“B” is for …) in UEFA Champions League games only — the highest level of competition he faced in club play. Here’s the top-line breakdown:On a game-by-game level, Pele leads Messi and Maradona in goal production by significant margins. Even Messi’s UEFA numbers, while stellar, don’t match Pele’s.3It’s perhaps worth mentioning that Messi averaged a considerably higher 1.59 goals plus assists per game for Barcelona in La Liga games, though the significance of those games is less certain because of the extreme imbalance between the league’s top teams and the rest. Pele’s five goals in eight games are a bit below what we would expect given what we know about his goal-scoring in other contexts (for example, Pele scored seven goals in his five previous World Cup games). And, importantly, Pele’s assist rate gives us a rare glimpse into that aspect of his game. If he was nearly as good at distributing the ball over his career as he was during these two World Cups, his value may have been even greater than we previously thought.But let’s zoom in a bit closer, going from the game-by-game data to the play-by-play data. First, let’s look at our “four” players’ shooting. The Opta data set has x-y coordinates for each shot, which means we can see the shot charts for all of them.4More detailed shot charts are also possible with this data.First is Messi-A, playing with Argentina in all World Cup or World Cup qualifying matches. (Note that this includes three goals from penalty kicks.) Second is Messi-B, playing in UEFA Champions League games for Barcelona:The Barcelona chart includes seven goals from penalty kicks. The main thing that sticks out is that compared to Messi-A, Messi-B takes fewer shots from distance and has been less successful with them.Now here are Maradona’s shots:Maradona was abysmal from distance! But he made a very high percentage of shots inside the box; none of these was a penalty.Finally, here’s Pele:Pele loved to launch it from long-range, and appears to have done so pretty well. However, I’d note that both of these goals were on direct free kicks, meaning neither he nor Maradona scored from outside the box on regular “open” plays in this data (something that is kind of Messi’s specialty).Here’s how those charts break down in numbers (excluding penalty shots):Messi-B wins this competition overall, though largely because of Pele’s affection for long attempts. Pele hit a higher percentage both inside the box and outside it, but ended up with a lower shooting percentage because he took over two-thirds of his shots from distance.5Note that Messi’s shooting for both Argentina and for Barca in UEFA matches trails his La Liga efficiency considerably. In regular league games he has made 9.9 percent of shots outside the penalty area and 25.7 percent inside it, for 20.2 percent overall (and even higher if you exclude free kicks, which are a relatively low percentage shots for him).Now let’s turn to dribbling skills. Of the play-by-play stats I used in my Messi study, one of my favorites was the “take on” or “1v1” stat, where we found that Messi takes on defenders one on one more than any forward tracked in our data set, and with a higher success rate. So, naturally, this is one of the first things I looked up in the historical data:Maradona took on defenders even more zestfully than Messi, and was slightly more successful in doing so. Pele, however, was almost as successful, though he made far fewer attempts per game. I should note, though, that taking on defenders was both more common and more likely to be successful in Pele’s and Maradona’s eras, so this may be a bit of an historical anomaly. In UEFA matches since 2010, teams had an average of about 18 “take on” attempts per game — succeeding 44.8 percent of the time. That’s less than the 21 or so per game by World Cup teams in the Pele and Maradona years; those players succeeded 49.4 percent of the time. Messi appears to be the greater outlier (especially if you consider La Liga, where he succeeds in one-on-one attempts 55.3 percent of the time, while the typical success rate is only 35.6 percent). My main inference from all of this is that defenses are probably tougher these days, which perhaps should affect how we interpret the other comparisons as well.Another area where Messi seems to have the edge is in passing accuracy and success rates. For this I’ll look at each player’s overall pass completion percentage and the “success” rate of his passes (that is, how often the pass leads to a “successful” play by the receiving player, such as a shot, or another pass):Both Messis attempt more passes than Maradona or Pele did, and both have higher completion percentages and success rates, though Pele’s stats look remarkably similar to Messi-A’s.That final stat, “touches with ‘successful’ pass,” basically tells us how often the player successfully extends his team’s possessions. But how do things go down when he uses the possession himself?To find that out, I slightly tweaked the “Possessions Used” stat I created in my previous article. First, to avoid any skew, I limited what qualifies as a touch to regular, open (non-set-piece) plays only. Each time a player did something that ended a possession, I logged one of three different outcomes: a lost ball (when a player was dispossessed, turned the ball over, failed in a one-on-one attempt, or passed to someone who lost the ball before managing to get off a shot or pass); a missed shot or chance (either the player missed a shot, or the player whom he set up to take a shot missed); or a goal (whether by the player’s own shot or an assist). As before, possession-extending events like successful one-on-ones don’t count themselves, though they may affect the relative likelihood of each outcome (e.g., successfully taking on a defender would presumably be reflected by scoring or assisting more goals). And passes that are successful but don’t immediately lead to shots don’t count as possessions at all. Our players compare like so:Of these “four” players, Pele produced the most goals (through shots and assists) per possession, with Messi-B slightly behind, Messi-A a little further back, and Maradona coming in a respectable fourth. Pele was also much more likely to take or create a shot attempt that missed than to lose possession of the ball any other way, which likely had secondary advantages (as missed shots often lead to rebound attempts, corner kicks, etc).Let’s recap the ways that Pele’s numbers stack up to Messi’s:Pele leads in rates of goals plus assists, whether by game or by possessions (as measured by Possession Used).A higher percentage of Pele’s Possessions Used came from missed shots rather than lost balls.Pele took on fewer defenders, but was similarly successful (though Messi is a bigger outlier for his era).Pele’s passing stats (both completion rate and success rate) are a little bit behind Messi’s, but not much.Although Pele’s overall shooting percentage is similar to Messi-A’s and a little behind Messi-B’s, this is largely a result of Pele taking almost twice as many shots from long range.Over this sample, Pele shot about as well as Messi from long range and considerably better from short range.I don’t mean to suggest that this proves Pele was better than Messi: In addition to the historical comparison issues I mentioned, we prefer not to draw conclusions from just eight games of data.But sample size isn’t a death knell in Bayesian analysis. While the 21 Maradona games are also a relatively small sample, that sample is probably large enough for us to conclude that Messi is likely the better player (though not necessarily as valuable to Argentina writ large) for two reasons: First, Messi comes out ahead of Maradona fairly consistently and by fairly good margins, and second, the data conforms with what we know of their broader careers, and what we would assume based on Messi playing in a stronger era.6Which is to say, in Bayesian terms, the data confirms our priors.But with Pele, we have essentially the opposite scenario. As amazing as Messi’s numbers are — from the career level down to the touch-by-touch level — Pele essentially matches or exceeds them stride for stride. So the thing those eight games confirm is the lack of a conclusive gap between Messi and Pele. In other words, we’ve precluded a simple answer to the Messi/Pele question: If Messi were a substantially more dominant player (even for his era), it would be very unlikely that we’d see results like these.I hope more Pele data emerges, so that we can get a better sense of how dominant he really was, and whether these eight World Cup games were consistent with his overall play (we should expect some regression to the mean just because they’re so good to begin with). But Messi has an opportunity to improve his standing: He’ll be adding more data to his sample Wednesday afternoon, and for many years to come. read more

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By the numbers Ohio State steamrolls Rutgers 497

OSU redshirt sophomore quarterback J.T. Barrett (16) and redshirt sophomore H-back Jalin Marshall (7) celebrate a touchdown against Rutgers on Oct. 24 at High Point Solutions Stadium. OSU won, 49-7. Credit: Samantha Hollingshead / Photo EditorThe offensive problems that have plagued Ohio State (8-0, 4-0) all season seem to have finally been resolved, for now. Redshirt sophomore quarterback J.T. Barrett returned to the starting lineup for the first time this season and he led the Buckeyes to a 49-7 rout in OSU’s first trip in program history to Piscataway, New Jersey, to take on Rutgers.Barrett totaled five touchdowns (three passing, two rushing) and 324 yards of offense as he helped show the nation the potential of the Buckeye offense that has been off to a rocky start.  Since being phased more and more into the offense after the game at Indiana, Barrett has collected 10 touchdowns and 500-plus yards of offense in his last three games combined. After Saturday night’s performance, it is clear that he has solidified his place once again as coach Urban Meyer’s No. 1 option.The Buckeye offense started slow in the first quarter, but once Barrett was settled in the offensive steamroller began moving, as the Buckeyes tallied 49 unanswered points on an overwhelmed Rutgers team. Junior Ezekiel Elliot ran for 142 yards and two touchdowns on 19 carries as he once again led the Buckeye rushing attack. Barrett also added his second straight 100-plus yard rushing game.On the defensive side of the ball, the Buckeyes were able to easily contain Rutgers all night long, and only gave up a touchdown in the final seconds of the game. Redshirt sophomore cornerback Gareon Conley picked off a pass, while sophomore Raekwon McMillan led the team with seven tackles.OSU has a bye next week before a home matchup against Minnesota, while Rutgers goes to Camp Randall Stadium to face off against Wisconsin on Oct. 31.By the numbers:21 – OSU picked up its 21st straight win last night, the longest current winning streak in the nation.2 – The amount of matchups ever between the Scarlet Knights and the Buckeyes, with the first meeting last year in Columbus. OSU is now 2-0 in the series.3 – The Big Ten currently has three undefeated teams in the top 10 of the AP Poll (Michigan State, OSU and Iowa). The Pac-12, SEC and ACC only have two between the three conferences.0 ­– The Buckeyes played a nearly flawless game on Saturday and didn’t get a single penalty called against them.49 – Tied for the most points put up by the Buckeyes this season (the other game was against Maryland).21-8 –  The Buckeyes enter a tough stretch to end the regular season, as they are scheduled to play four teams with a current combined record of 21-8, and all of whom feature a current winning record (Minnesota, at Illinois, Michigan State, at Michigan). read more

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House approves Rep Bizons plan to ensure safety of bicyclists on Michigan

first_img Drivers must give a three-foot clearance when passing a bicyclistThe Michigan House this week approved state Rep. Dr. John Bizon’s legislation to require motorists to maintain at least a three-foot distance to increase safety when passing a bicyclist.“This plan requires motorists to maintain a safe distance while passing a bicyclist ensuring the safety of all roadway users,” said Bizon, of Battle Creek.The number of fatalities for cyclists hit by vehicles is on the rise. There were 38 Michigan bicyclist deaths in 2016 according to a report by the Michigan Office of Highway Safety. This number is up from 33 fatalities in 2015 and 21 fatalities in 2014.Over 39 states have laws regarding a safe passing distance.House Bill 4185 now moves to the Senate for consideration.### 07Jun House approves Rep. Bizon’s plan to ensure safety of bicyclists on Michigan roads Categories: Bizon Newslast_img read more

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