Month: January 2021

Friedman speaks at ND Forum

first_imgPulitzer Prize winning journalist Thomas Friedman talked about the effects technology and the interconnectedness of the world has had on international ethics at the Notre Dame Forum’s signature event Wednesday. A panel discussion with a select group of Notre Dame faculty and students followed Friedman’s lecture. NBC News correspondent Norah O’Donnell moderated the event. Friedman discussed changes to global business practices that he first approached in his book, “Hot, Flat, and Crowded,” and specifically how these changes have affected technology’s role in the economy. In the past 10 years, the global economic field was leveled as technological developments brought an unprecedented number of people together through the Internet. As a result, Friedman said the world is now “flat,” — to a degree that was unimaginable for previous generations. “In a space of five years, we wired the world with fiber optic cable so much that Shanghai and South Bend accidentally became next door neighbors,” he said. “No matter where you were living in the world you could talk to someone on the computer. “When I say the world is flat that’s what I mean: We created a platform for multiple forms of collaboration. When we did that we fundamentally changed the world,” he said. This shift brought about huge changes to human morals, which eventually led to the economic crisis, Friedman said. “The first thing it’s changing is how we think about ethics,” he said. “As I look back on the events of 2007 and 2008, a lot of people look at it as just a financial crisis. I don’t. “I think the story of the last three years was a massive American breakdown in how we did our business and how we interacted with other nations.” Friedman said he believes it wasn’t a “coincidence” that the economic crisis emerged at a time when globalization caused visible negative effects on the environment. “When historians look back at this period we just went through, they’ll say this is the moment the market and Mother Nature, through the climate system, hit a wall,” he said. “This is the moment when the market and Mother Nature said, ‘you are growing in an unsustainable way. Turn back now.’” Friedman said Americans practiced the same “faulty” unethical accounting in both economic and environmental issues. “In the market we were allowing people to massively under-price risks and privatize the gains,” he said. “We’ve been doing the exact same accounting in nature by massively under-pricing the risks of admitting carbon molecules. In both instances we are socializing losses on the backs of every American taxpayer.” To move away from this cycle, Friedman said American lawmakers and voters must move away from a system focused on situational values to sustainable values. “The only way to affect both the environment and the market is to have sustainable values,” he said. “In the flat world, moving back to sustainable values will be the an achievement of the people coming of age right now.” Friedman told the audience he believes there is even a place for God in his theories concerning the marketplace and globalization, but it depends on individual views of God.  “The post-biblical view of God is that God is present based on our own actions and decisions,” he said. “Whether it is a real room, or a chat room, you have to bring him there yourself based on your own behavior. By the moral or immoral mouse clicks.” Friedman said he believes morals need to play a role in American government as lawmakers struggle to move the country forward in the changing “flat” world. “You have to know what world you’re living in,” Friedman said. “We had a complete breakdown of authority in this country.” If America wants to move out of the economic crisis, Friedman said the government will be responsible for creating a situation to enable this action. “Sometimes the longest way to the solution is actually the shortest way,” he said. “When you’ve built a solid foundation, you can move from this notion of ‘too big to fail,” to ‘too sustainable to fail.’ And this is a base from which you can excel and change.”last_img read more

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College to debut Steinway grand piano at concert

first_imgSaint Mary’s College will introduce a new Steinway & Sons Model D Concert Grand Piano to the College’s Department of Music in its debut performance at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 14 in Little Theatre of Moreau Center for the Arts, the College stated in a press release on Oct. 25. Nancy Menk, chair of the department of music, said the piano is a gift from Louise Addicott and Yatish Joshi in honor of their daughter, Georgina. The piano was christened “Georgina” on behalf of Joshi’s daughter and her appreciation for all mediums of music – on and off the stage, Gwen O’Brien, director of media relations, said. Joshi paired the gift with a letter to the College that stated his desire to inspire “students to greater heights in their music education and musical careers.” The letter also expressed the couple’s single vision in which young musicians experience various educational, career development and performance opportunities. “We are thrilled with the donation of this wonderful instrument to our department of music,” Menk said. “Our students will benefit from the Joshis’ generosity for years to come. Georgina was a superb singer, and now our singers have an excellent instrument bearing her name to accompany them in rehearsal and performance.” Georgina attended John Adams High School and the Royal College of Music in London, and then Indiana University (IU) Bloomington’s Jacobs School of Music, Menk said. Joshi’s letter also mentioned how Georgina had performed at Saint Mary’s after graduating from Royal College of Music and with the South Bend Chamber Singers for a number of years, the release stated. Menk said she knew Georgina well because of her participation in the local music community. “She sang with the South Bend Chamber Singers under my direction when she was in high school and returned from IU to sing Bach’s B Minor Mass with us as well,” Menk said. “She gave a recital at Saint Mary’s at one time.” Addicott and Joshi also offered to rebuild College’s existing Steinway piano. “Our current pianos sustained damage while they were on the O’Laughlin Stage when last year’s fire there occurred, so this donation is especially timely as we need to have quality pianos for our students and faculty,” Menk said. The dedicatory recital performance features Jeffrey Jacob, professor of music and concert pianist. O’Brien said Jacob received his master’s degree at Juilliard and his doctorate from the Peabody Conservatory at Johns Hopkins University. Jacob’s history of audiences – who range from Hong Kong to Dublin and all over the U.S. – make him the perfect musician to consecrate the piano’s place in Moreau. “Jeffrey Jacob is a College faculty pianist, so it is only natural that he would give the dedicatory recital,” Menk said.  He will be retiring at the end of this academic year, so this is a very special recital for him and for our campus.” “This new piano, as well as our current Steinway D, which is in the process of being rebuilt, thanks to a gift from the Georgina Joshi Foundation, will be kept locked when not in use in a new piano ‘garage’ that is being constructed on the O’Laughlin Stage,” Menk said. This is not the first time a piano has been donated to the music department, Menk said. “Several years ago an alumna donated a baby grand piano for use in Stapleton Lounge, but we have never received a donation of a concert grand piano, to my knowledge,” Menk said. “The pianos may be used by anyone, but with the permission of the Department of Music or the Office of Special Events.” The event is open to the public and free of charge. A reception will follow the event. Contact Rebecca O’Neil at [email protected]last_img read more

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Bishop inspires architect students

first_imgBishop Kevin Rhoades of the Catholic diocese of Fort Wayne–South Bend spoke on the role of architects in service to the Church in a lecture to the School of Architecture in Bond Hall on Wednesday afternoon.Rhoades said architects serve the Church’s mission of proclaiming the Word of God, the new evangelization through beauty. Architects also serve the sacred liturgy and prayer and the Church’s mission of charity.“I’m not an expert in architecture,” Rhoades said. “I speak as a bishop of the Church about your service of the Church through architecture. And it’s a service for which I’m deeply grateful, especially as I’m here at Notre Dame because your School of Architecture is renowned for its service of the Church, in not only preserving but fostering anew the Church’s rich tradition of sacred architecture.”Architects should look at their profession as a vocation, Rhoades said.“When men and women of faith become architects and see their work as a call from God, when they are led by the spirit of the Gospel, their lives and their work can contribute to the sanctification of the world,” Rhoades said. “It becomes a participation in God’s work of creation and also a means of growth in holiness.”Rhoades spoke of the influence of church architecture in his own prayer life, describing the church he attended as a child as a “beautiful Gothic structure.”“It was our spiritual home,” he said. “Seeing the sacredness and the beauty of the space, I was naturally drawn to prayer.”A new church was built in the 1970s, Rhoades said, in a more modern style.“No longer when I entered the church, was I able to contemplate heavenly realities,” he said. “I could still pray there, but it wasn’t as natural to pray in the new church as it was in the old. The building didn’t draw me into prayer like the old church.“I share this with you to impress upon you the spiritual vocation that you have as architects, how what you do in building churches impacts people and their spiritual lives. And I don’t blame anybody for what happened at my home parish church. It was the 1970s. There was a lot of confusion. There was confusion about theology, confusion about the liturgy. This confusion and the ‘trendiness’ of the times did a lot of damage. And that damage naturally flowed into the area of church art and architecture.”Rhoades said he believes church architecture is returning to a more traditional style.“I think of Pope Benedict’s hermeneutic of continuity, not rupture – whether we’re talking about theology, liturgy or architecture,” he said. “I believe that this idea has really taken hold; I see it in my priests and I see it in so many young people, this importance of tradition, but not just staying fixed in the past, but continuity. All this will lead, I think, with the help of God’s grace, to a new springtime for the Church and hopefully a discovery or a rediscovery of the faith in the lives of many people. You have a part to play in this exciting venture of the new evangelization.”Throughout the history of the Church, art and architecture have served the Church as expressions of faith, Rhoades said.“I’m grateful for what you do here at Notre Dame, to promote the building of churches that are both places of prayer and true works of art. Because really, the Church needs you. Bishops like myself need you,” he said. “We need your talent, you ingenuity. We need you to proclaim and serve the mystery of faith in what you do. And your works proclaim the goodness and the beauty of the Christian faith.”Rhoades said traditional styles of architecture have an order to them that reflects God’s creative activity, in which he brought order from chaos.“In my opinion, some modern forms of architecture have moved in a direction that does not reflect order. And that leads to a certain expression that I don’t think sufficiently serves the Christian vision of things, let alone the Church’s liturgy,” he said.“Some forms of modern architecture don’t seem to me to be suitable for church buildings. Because unlike Greek architecture or Roman architecture, which expressed ideas of perfection, of order, of beauty, of truth – they were compatible with Christian teaching — some architecture today doesn’t seem to me to be compatible,” he said. “Attempts to make them compatible have often revealed problematic theological views because oftentimes its theology that can be skewed, and that influences architecture.”The sense of the transcendent and the sense of the sacred can be lost, Rhoades said.“I think it’s imperative that we recover the sense of the sacred in the celebration of the Church’s liturgy and in the Church’s art and architecture,” he said. “Truly, sacred art and architecture, and the liturgy, and liturgical music, should be oriented to God, not to ourselves.“Catholic art and architecture should be in continuity, like the liturgy, with the tradition of the Church through the ages. A church should lift one’s heart and mind to God, not ourselves gathered together to worship him. Beautiful church architecture indeed invites people to lift their minds and hearts to God,” he said.Rhoades said churches should speak of the mystery of God’s beauty.“The world needs this,” he said. “The world needs beauty. The world needs God. God is beauty.”Tags: architecture, architecture lecture, bishop kevin rhoades, bishop rhoades, rhoades, School of Architecturelast_img read more

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Student groups stage ‘die-in’ demonstration

first_imgEmily McConville | The Observer Notre Dame students and South Bend community members “die in” at the South Bend city council building on Monday to protest racism.“[We prayed for] the healing of our community as a whole,” Petrovic said. “We wanted to recognize and mourn that loss and the sense of un-safety that a lot of us are feeling.”On Monday, the group set up rides to a die-in and demonstration at the South Bend City Council building, organized by local rapper “Blu” Casey, special education teacher Regina Williams and Gladys Muhammad, associate director of the South Bend Heritage Foundation. Petrovic estimated 25 Notre Dame students attended. She said the group joined with the community organizers in order to show solidarity with South Bend.“When there’s no community solidarity, you can’t take solid action and meet the problems that are going on,” Petrovic said. “There’s long been a chasm between the Notre Dame community and the South Bend community, so we want to dissolve that chasm.”Small-group discussions in which community members developed action plans followed the die-in at the City Council building, which also lasted 4.5 minutes. Sophomore Jourdyhn Williams, Notre Dame NAACP’s Diversity Council representative, attended the South Bend and Notre Dame die-ins and said her group discussed resurrecting the “I, Too, Am Notre Dame” photo project.“Our group mostly consisted of Notre Dame students,” Williams said. “Our biggest issue was trying to bridge the gap between Notre Dame students and the South Bend community because on campus a lot of people say we’re in our own bubble.“Basically one of the things we proposed was bringing back the photo project that was started last year by a student who graduated that was called ‘I, Too Am Notre Dame.’”Williams said she was glad her community was able to demonstrate in a constructive way.“I was obviously hurt by the [Ferguson and Staten Island] decisions,” she said. “It makes me sad to see things that are going on across the country. The protests — people breaking into things, tearing up the city — I also don’t think that’s the response that people should take because if we want to be treated as equals, we can’t be going around tearing up property and want equality or want justice, because we’re falling into the trap that they’re setting for us.”Tuesday’s Notre Dame die-in lasted 11 minutes, symbolizing the 11 times Garner said, “I can’t breathe” before he died. Junior Alex Rice, president of the Africana Studies Club, said she was struck by the number and diversity of people who attended.“It was a large group, and not just large, the makeup of the crowd was very diverse,” Rice said. “You had faculty, you had administrators — some of them I’d never seen but they came out in support. I just hope that community feels empowered to keep meeting, keep doing things. I know it’s kind of hard because we are leaving in a week, but I hope we still hear that same kind of fervor and excitement and involvement into next semester.”Wednesday, a dinner and discussion session will take place at Legends at 7:30. Petrovic said the event will be a way to plan for the future.“We’re going to come out of it with an action plan going into next semester, of what we’re going to do to keep these conversations going,” Petrovic said. “How do we want to keep raising awareness and keep getting people to engage in these conversations that they wouldn’t necessarily?”Petrovic said the event will also be an opportunity for people who disagreed with the demonstrations to join the discussion.“We really want our non-sympathizers to come out,” she said. “We don’t want them to stay silent or feel like we don’t want to engage with them because we do.”Thursday, the organizers plan to set up a display between DeBartolo and O’Shaughnessy Halls.Kathryn Lance, a PhD student in the Peace Studies Program, said the week is a way for students to take action in the context of their own environment.“Taking part in actions such as those being coordinated on campus this week and hopefully in the upcoming semester help people to feel less hopeless and defeated and may even make them feel more empowered,” she said. “It is a way for us as single individuals to tap into a wider, nationwide movement that is standing up, speaking out and demanding change.”Petrovic said she heard racial slurs and curse words during Tuesday’s die-in and saw negative comments on social media sites such as Yik Yak, but she was encouraged by the numbers and diversity of the demonstrators.“We want to make sure, when things like this happen, we feel a sense of community that shows that not just black people are concerned about this,” Petrovic said. “It’s not just Latinos who are concerned about this. If you look at the die-in earlier, there were way more white people than black people.“That gives us in the black community and Latino community a sense of comfort and solidarity in knowing that we’re not the only ones who care about our lives. We’re not the only ones who feel a sense of loss or a sense of grieving when things like this happen.”Tags: Africana Studies, BLSA, die-in, Latino Student Alliance, LSA, NAACP As part of a series of protests this week against police brutality and racial injustice, Notre Dame students staged a “die-in” between O’Shaughnessy and DeBartolo Halls at 12:15 Tuesday, lying down on the sidewalk as students in both buildings changed classes. Emily McConville | The Observer Students and members of the Notre Dame community cover the space in between O’Shaughnessy and DeBartolo Halls in a “die-in” Tuesday, part of a demonstration against police brutality and racial injustice.The die-in was part of the All Lives Matter Week to End Racial Injustice organized by the Notre Dame National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), the Latino Student Alliance (LSA), the Black Law Student Association (BLSA), the Progressive Student Alliance (PSA) and students in the Masters in Peace Studies program. The events also include a prayer service, another die-in, a roundtable discussion and a public display.The demonstrations come most directly in response to the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner. The week before Thanksgiving break, protests erupted across the country after a grand jury decided not indict Darren Wilson, a white police officer who fatally shot Brown, an unarmed black man, in August in Ferguson, Missouri.Two weeks after the decision in Wilson’s case, more protests broke out when a Staten Island grand jury also did not indict Daniel Pantaleo, the police officer implicated in Garner’s death in July. While a group of officers tried to arrest Garner for selling untaxed cigarettes, Pantaleo put him in a fatal chokehold.In response to these events, NAACP Notre Dame president and senior Niciah Petrovic said she invited representatives of several campus organizations to join a planning committee last week.“We wanted to make sure we gave as many people as possible the opportunity to shape what this week would look like,” she said.Sophomore Xitlaly Estrada, LSA’s social justice chair, said the purpose of the week is to start conversation about the institutional nature of police brutality.“My goals are not just to spread awareness about police brutality and its victims but also about the underlying factor behind many of these injustices,” she said. “I’d hope that after this week more people will be willing to realize that we don’t live in a post-racial society, but we must openly act to combat racism, prejudices and systematic injustices so that one day we might.”Petrovic said the events are also meant to address backlash among Notre Dame students against the national protests.“We have classmates of ours, peers of ours, people that we live in dorms with and eat with telling us that this isn’t an issue, or you guys make everything about race, or even a lot of hateful and hurtful things have been said,” she said. “We have to take the time to, one, make space to engage in our feelings about this and, two, to bring into the conversation people who may just not be enlightened about what these issues are and how they’re complicit in them.”Petrovic said the planning committee decided with a vote to organize the week using the title “All Lives Matter,” instead of “Black Lives Matter,” which is more commonly used nationally, in order to be inclusive of all allies of the movement.All Lives Matter Week began Sunday afternoon at the Grotto, where organizers handed out copies of the Yale Law School BLSA’s statement denouncing the Ferguson grand jury decision and asked for 4.5 minutes of silence, symbolizing the 4.5 hours Brown’s body was left in the street after he died. Petrovic said the group walked to Ryan Hall for a prayer service afterwards.last_img read more

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Dillon hosts annual light show

first_imgDillon Hall residents strung their dorm’s lights themselves this year after a change in price made it impossible for them to pay Maintenance to put up the usual decorations.Dillon Hall vice-president Michael DiGaetano said the price to put up the Dillon Hall Christmas lights increased dramatically from last year to this year. The Dillon Hall Light Show, an annual Christmas tradition at Notre Dame, was dubbed ‘How the Dome Stole Christmas’ this year in response, he said.“Normally, the Dome charges us around 20 to 50 dollars to provide a cherry-picker … to help put the lights up on the building,” DiGaetano said. “This year, they upped the price to $2,800 and the explanation was that it would require a lot of man-hours to complete. The price jump did not really make sense though, because it was the same amount of man-hours as every other year, since it is the same amount of decorations.”Senior Director of Utilities and Maintenance Paul Kempf said the cost shift for dorm Christmas decorations was a cross-campus measure put in place this year.“Because of the significant costs involved, the decision was made in conjunction with the Housing Office to have each residence hall assume financial responsibility for its own Christmas display,” Kempf said. “This decision was communicated to the rectors.”Kempf said the prices provided for each hall were based on last year’s actual expenses.The holiday decorations and lights involved in Dillon’s Light Show are the most difficult on campus to put up each year, he said.“Dillon’s Christmas light display is by far the most complex and labor intensive display of any of the residence halls, requiring trade labor and lift equipment to install and remove,” Kempf said.Dillon Hall president Eric Woitchek said the explanation Maintenance gave for the change in price was confusing for Dillon residents.“Maintenance sent us an email that said, ‘I pulled the time cards from last year’s installation/removal at Dillon. It took 22 carpenter hours, 12 sheet metal hours and 9 hours of lift time.’” Woitchek said. “‘Considering the tradesmen on campus are union workers, and requiring this many hours to install/remove, I hope you understand how costs can escalate rapidly. We have done everything we can to try to keep costs down, but with this particular display there is really no way around it.’”But [Maintenance] didn’t build anything for us — the show doesn’t involve any sheet metal at all. We already have all the lights and chicken wire – essentially all they had to do was hang it. So the nine lift hours – I don’t know, you probably have two guys, and they spend two-and-a-half hours to put it up and two-and-a-half hours to take it down. But that doesn’t cost $2,800 — or, we didn’t think it should. … It was a surprise to all of us.”Even though the show would be smaller without the usual Christmas light display, Woitchek said he believed it was “imperative” that there be some kind of Dillon Hall Light Show this year.“As president, I didn’t want to see the tradition die on my watch,” Woitchek said. “I’m a big traditions guy, that’s one of the reasons I came to Notre Dame in the first place. It’s a school that’s rich in tradition. And being placed in Dillon, one of the oldest dorms on campus, it’s a dorm that has a lot of tradition – a legacy here, if you know what I mean. So it was important to me that the tradition didn’t die completely.”The importance of Dillon Hall tradition is what brought the dorm residents together to create an alternative light show, DiGaetano said.“Since it would be entirely student resources, the light show is not as grand as it normally is but the spirit behind the light show is just as grand if not more,” he said. “… The men of Dillon decided to keep the tradition alive any way that we could, and other dorms felt the same way and decided to help out. Sure, it was a little disappointing to have fewer lights and not as good of a show, but you have to work with what you have.”The support for the Light Show has continued to be overwhelming, despite these difficulties, DiGaetano said. The Show will continue to run tonight after Milkshake Mass and on Friday at 7 p.m.“I would say there were no real detrimental effects [that resulted from the change with the lights],” DiGaetano said. “Sure, the light show is not as good as it normally is, but many students, about 400 to be exact, gathered together to celebrate the true meaning of our Christmas traditions. Many dorms, including Walsh, Ryan, Welsh Family, Lyons, and Cavanaugh, among others, created walkovers to the event with a few hours notice.“Having about 400 people at an event with no more than a day’s notice is pretty incredible for a dorm event, so it’s clear that the tradition is incredibly important to the students.”Despite the successful turnout this year, Woitchek said he hoped Dillon Hall and the Maintenance Department would be able to find a compromise by next Christmas.“We were disappointed in the way things happened, and we’d like to find some kind of resolution and fix this for years to come,” he said. “Because [Dillon] can’t afford $3,000 dollars, but we feel like the community appreciates what we do for it around the Christmas season.”Tags: Christmas season, Dillon Hall, Light Showlast_img read more

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‘Debating Our Future:’ panel discusses role of moderators, presidential debates at forum

first_imgThomas Mologne Fr. John Jenkins, Janet Brown and Dorothy Ridings speak at Wednesday’s forum.Former PBS anchor Jim Lehrer, who moderated 12 debates, cut in. “Let the record reflect, I didn’t ask that question,” he said.The role of moderators in presidential debates — how the Commission on Presidential Debates chooses them, which questions they should ask, how they should approach fact-checking — was a key theme in the first installment of the 2016 Notre Dame Forum, “Debating Our Future,” held Wednesday night at the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center (DPAC).At the Forum, University President Fr. John Jenkins asked a panel comprised of Lehrer and Schieffer, as well as Janet Brown, executive director of the Commission on Presidential Debates, and Dorothy Ridings, former president of the League of Women Voters, questions about the evolution of presidential debates and their function in American politics. Audience members were able to ask their own questions via email. Brown said televised presidential debates date back to 1960, when John F. Kennedy famously debated Richard Nixon — three election cycles passed before one was held again. “The candidates did not see them as an imperative,” Brown said. “They saw them as something that could be avoided with impunity, and that’s what they did.”By 1976, the League of Women Voters had hosted radio debates for years, Ridings added. That year, legislation was passed that allowed non-partisan organizations unconnected to the media, like the League, to sponsor debates that television networks could broadcast. It was the League of Women Voters that created the criteria a general-election candidate had to meet to participate in the debate, criteria that still stand today: eligibility to run for president under the Constitution, petitioning to be on ballots in enough states to win the electoral college and, most controversially, polling at or above 15 percent nationally. The last requirement usually disqualifies all but the major party candidates — the one exception was John Anderson, an independent candidate who qualified for one debate in 1980. “There has to be some way, and this is the tough part of all this, of ascertaining who should be on that stage, who really has deserved to be in that place to be heard by an audience that has to make hard choices,” Ridings said. The League, sometimes accused of disorganization, sponsored debates until 1988, at which point the Commission on Presidential Debates, whose board of directors now includes Jenkins, formed. “The debates had taken on a level of importance where it should be run by an organization with no other agenda in the general election,” Brown said. Brown said the Commission looks for moderators who are experienced and fair journalists who are comfortable on live TV.“They are there to facilitate, not to compete, not to take up a lot of time with hard questions that people don’t know how to answer,” she said.   For his part, Lehrer said nobody at the Commission tried to influence the questions he asked or the content of the debates. Since moderating his first debate in 1988, he said the format has gone from one with more-or-less scripted questions and answers to one that is more open, in which candidates can freely talk to each other. “What has happened in this process is being a moderator is becoming increasingly difficult,” he said. “It is really hard work because now, you have candidates with freedom to engage, freedom to ask questions, freedom not to to shut up if you want them to. … The moderator’s got to have a tremendous amount of knowledge, not so that you can write a bunch of questions, but so you can listen, so you can follow up, so you can have a sense of fairness.”  Schieffer said he tries to come into debates as prepared as possible — for one of the 2012 debates, he interviewed dozens of experts in think tanks, potential debate questions numbering in the hundreds. Both Schieffer and Lehrer, however, stressed the importance of pulling back and letting candidates talk. “In this new format in particular — the open format — the moderator [has to] be able to listen,” Lehrer said.Besides a more open format, Lehrer said another major change is the introduction of split screens during the debates, displaying both the candidate talking and the opponent reacting. As Al Gore, unable to get a word in during a 2000 debate against George W. Bush, learned the hard way, body language has become increasingly important. “I became more keenly aware of it, and candidates have become more keenly aware of it as well,” Lehrer said. “I’ve noticed in the progression of debates that I’ve moderated since then, candidates are very careful about what they do because they know they’re being watched all the time.”Schieffer said moderating debates taught him that, especially since many have already decided on a candidate by the time the debates roll around, voters want to get to know the candidates as people, something that does not always involve strict policy discussion. It’s the moderator’s job, he said, to make that happen, which is why he asked Bush and John Kerry in 2004 what they learned from the women in their lives. “Party is important, a person’s positions are important, but the overall question in voters’ minds is, ‘Who I would be most comfortable with in times of crisis?’” Schieffer said.  In response to an audience question about whether moderators should fact check candidates, Schieffer said he does consider that his job — but not right away. “It is the responsibility of the moderator to make sure the truth gets out, but the chief fact checker should be the candidates themselves,” he said. “If candidate A says something … you should give the other candidate an opportunity to correct him. If he doesn’t, the moderator should step in and state what the facts are.” The point of debates, Lehrer said, is for both sides of an issue to be presented in real time. “These are the only opportunities we have as voters to see the candidates on the same stage, in the same place, at the same time being asked the same questions and so forth,” he said. Other questions came in: Could Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson participate in a debate even if he hasn’t reached the 15 percent polling threshold? No, Brown said, though the criteria are constantly reassessed. Do debates encourage the development of quips or one-liners? Yes, Lehrer said, though most candidates deny it. How do new media affect the televised debates? No matter how it’s broadcast, the style of the debate will stay important, Lehrer said. Does race or gender play a role in the selection of moderators or the treatment of candidates during the debates? Brown said the Commission looks for both diversity and experience in its moderators, which feeds into fair treatment for the candidates. “There is no sense that any candidate is treated any differently than any other candidate,” she said.  Brown said major-party candidates will never be required to attend a debate, but they have become such an integral part of the election season that skipping one is disadvantageous. “The mandate in these debates in public opinion,” Brown said. “People want to see these debates. These audiences are so much larger than they are for any other kind of political programming.” Asked at the end of the discussion why debates are important, both Brown and Ridings said they exemplify the free exchange of ideas, something leaders they meet from developing countries try to emulate. Schieffer said they allow voters to find out as much about candidates as possible. Lehrer said the debates are as “sacred” as voting itself. “That institution … makes it possible for everybody in America at the same time or at any pace they want to now with new technology to see these candidates, the people who will be in this position … the most powerful position in the world,” he said. “You can see them in an environment that is clean, that is fair, that is presented in such a way it’s serious. It’s not there to make you laugh, it’s not there to make you cry. It’s there to make you an informed voter.”  Tags: “Debating Our Future”, 2016 Presidential Election, Commission on Presidential Debates If Bob Schieffer could ask Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump one question at a presidential debate this fall, it would be: Why do you think people don’t like you?“A follow-up question might be ‘Why do you think it is that this is happening?’” Schieffer, former “Face the Nation” host and moderator of three debates, said as his audience applauded. “We’re at a point where our whole political infrastructure has collapsed, frankly, and how is it that the campaign came down to these two candidates? That’s the question that I hear more than any other question, and it might be interesting to ask the candidates, ‘Why do you think it’s come down to you two?’”last_img read more

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Former football player reflects on discerning career

first_imgTags: football, NFL, Raghib Ismail, Toronto Argonauts Notre Dame Law School’s “Journal of International and Comparative Law” hosted a symposium titled “From Courts of Sport to Courts of Justice” on Friday to discuss legal issues relating to sports. The event was capped off with a discussion — moderated by law student Matthew Clark — with former Notre Dame kick returner and wide receiver, Raghib ‘Rocket’ Ismail, who discussed his football career, brand and certain legal issues plaguing the football industry.Ismail started off the event by discussing the origins of his nickname, which was given to him by his track coach when he was a junior high student in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. “I came out the block and his reaction was … ‘That’s it — that kid came out of the blocks like a rocket,’” he said. “The next day in school, when I would pass some of the upperclassman in the halls … ‘Oh look who it is, the Rocket.’”Ismail said despite the nickname, he didn’t recognize his potential to move onto the higher levels of the sport until late in his high school career.“I didn’t realize how fast I was until my senior year, our coaches took us to this football camp at Syracuse University,” he said. “I remember when I ran my [40-yard dash], I came back and [the timers] were looking at their watches and looking at each other.”Ismail said he eventually decided to come to play football at Notre Dame, where he won a national championship in 1988 and was named an All-American in 1990. He said this success led him to consider playing professionally — an ambition that was strengthened when his teammate’s mother died after the 1991 Orange Bowl.“I remember my brother woke me up the next morning urgently,” he said. “He saw in the news that Chris Zorich — he got back to Chicago and found his mother at home, she had passed away. It was like a spirit of fear overcame me. … A lot of the reason I was doing what I was doing was because somehow this [was] going to provide for my family since my father was gone, and my mother and grandmother were struggling to make ends meet.”Despite his potential to be a high-draft pick in the NFL, Ismail said he was swayed to play in the Canadian Football League by Los Angeles Kings owner Bruce McNall, who hoped to use Ismail as a way to establish an expansion team in the NFL.“Bruce McNall partnered with John Candy, who was a comedian — a real funny cat — and Wayne Gretzky, a legendary hockey guy, planning to buy a team in Toronto, a metropolis that was just busting at the seams with potential for market share,” he said. “They were going to buy the team, the Toronto Argonauts, and after they bought the team, they were going to take what the NFL did with expansion and throw their hat in the ring. They wanted me to sign with them. They gave me ownership in the team. My salary would be $4 million a year. They gave me equity.”Ismail said this contract convinced him to sign with the Toronto Argonauts.“Well, I guess if I’m going to provide for my family, this is how it’s going to happen, and I ended up signing for Toronto,” he said.After discussing his football career, Ismail began discussing the game’s legal issues and said players should be paid under certain conditions.“You can’t pay the athletes without educating them,” he said. “If you’re a part of this generation, you’re a consumer by default now. … There should be financial courses that you are required to take,” he said.Ismail said the lawsuit against the NFL over concussions reminds him that athletes can face serious consequences for playing sports.“In 2011 and 2012 … there was some information that was exposed, and there was negligence,” he said. “I remember when it was brought to the forefront, getting calls from a couple of players who were like, ‘Hey man, this is going on, and this is what happened,’ and then information started coming out about the long-term effects of getting concussions and brain injuries. I remember going to meet with them and realizing this is pretty serious.”Ismail said this information altered what activities he allowed his children to participate in while they were growing up, including his son Raghib Ismail Jr., who currently plays football for Texas Christian University.“I didn’t let him play football until he reached puberty,” he said.Ismail said despite his reservations, he didn’t want this controversy to dictate his son’s future.“In life, you can’t make decisions based on fear,” he said. “Even though this is a potential hazard of what you want to do, you … have to be able to deal wisely with that hazard and proceed accordingly.”last_img read more

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Lecturer analyzes racist language and words

first_imgLuvell Anderson, assistant professor of philosophy at the University of Memphis, spoke about how those with different racial and social backgrounds experience and inhabit different realities. Anderson explored this topic through the analysis of the word “thug.”Anderson said he is currently focusing his writings on understanding racial realities and how they differ from person to person. “I’m developing a chapter in my writing on cross-cultural understandings,” he said. “It aims to characterize the issues that arise when we try to understand different racial realities.” Anderson focused the lecture on derogatory words and slurs. Some derogatory words are not seen as such — particularly the word “thug,” even though it does carry racial connotations and has links to “blackness.”“A lot of people might not recognize it as a slur, they might not recognize it as having racial connotations,” he said. “But, ‘thug’ itself does carry racist connotations, and that is due to a link between black criminality.”Anderson said there are several examples of association between “thug” and “blackness.”“The first example comes from the name of a blog called ‘Thug Kitchen,’” he said. “It was a recipe blog that offered simple recipes for vegan dishes. What was supposed to be unique about the blog was that it employed a stereotypical mock-black language. It was all good, until the identity of the bloggers was revealed: two white Californians. There are some forms of speech, that, depending on your identity, you don’t have license to use. So since the blog was heavily based on what was a mock black language, the humor was tied to the connection between thug and blackness. If you didn’t make that connection, you wouldn’t have understood the blog.”Anderson said that he experienced this form of discrimination as a young crossing guard. Anderson said he and a friend both neglected to wear the designated orange crossing guard belts and were approached by an officer about it, although, the officer’s reactions to each of the boys was different.  “[An officer] asked where our crossing guard belts were,” he said. “He told my friend to put his on and told me to go home and get mine. When I got back, the officer was gone, but my friend relayed to me this conversation he and the officer had. The officer said, ‘You really should be careful about hanging out with thugs like him.’ The only words that were exchanged between me and him were ‘I don’t have my belt,’ and ‘I’ll run home.’ Not a very substantial basis for making judgements about my criminal history. So what else could he have drawn on to make such a claim? There is one factor: the fact that I was black.” Anderson said the association between “blackness” and crime has been around for centuries, citing a 1911 report from Chicago which reported that criminal activity was centered within minority communities. “Whenever prostitutes, cadets and thugs were located among white people, they had to be removed … and were driven to the undesirable parts of the city — the so-called colored residential sections.” Anderson said, quoting the report. “One thing this example tells us is the association between space and criminality,” he added. “So where did crime belong? According to this, crime didn’t belong in white areas, but was an active fit for the ‘colored’ areas. You can only make that sort of judgement if you’re already associating a link between blackness and criminality.” Anderson said a way to combat stereotypical and racist connotations of the word “thug” is for black people to rethink the way they see themselves. “In one constraint, the use of ‘thug’ is a restriction of one’s imagination, or what one can conceive of as one’s possible way of being in the world, or even the amount of respect one gives to oneself,” he said. “The idea of self determination and how black people think of themselves is key.”Anderson said an example of this can be gleaned from football player Richard Sherman’s reaction to being labeled a thug on the Internet. “Sherman expressed disappointment and said the following: ‘I was on the football field showing passion. I wasn’t committing any crimes and doing anything illegal.’ In essence, Sherman rejected the term because it did not apply,” he said. “This might seem like a sensible strategy, but I don’t think it’s the best one to adopt. Denying the linguistic application actually reinstated what was immediately objectionable. If Sherman readily rejects the label, it implies that he accepts the broader associations of the word. I think a better model of resistance might be linguistic appropriation.”Anderson said the best representation of linguistic appropriation as an act of resistance is the ideology of Tupac Shakur. Anderson said Shakur was known for displaying “thug culture,” from tattoos to once describing the use of thug as “a new kind of black power.”“His use of the word is intentional, under his own description,” Anderson said. Anderson said an objection to this form of resistance is its suspected endorsement of violence.“One objection to this approach is that people say it endorses criminality,” he said. “Jay Leno criticized Tupac for what he say as a glorification of violence and criminality. Tupac explicitly disavowed endorsing, or glorifying criminality and violence. He said in an interview, ‘Let me say for the record, I am not a gangster, never have been. I’m not the thief who grabs your purse. I’m not the guy who jacks your car. I’m not down with people who steal and hurt others. I’m just a brother who fights back. I’m not some closet psycho. I got a job. I’m an artist.’ I think this suggests that Tupac’s appropriation of thug life, is not a glorification of violence, but a fight back against internalization of racist characterizations.” Tags: Diversity, language, Racism, stereotypeslast_img read more

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Graduating seniors prepare for career paths

first_imgThe members of the class of 2018 plan to pursue a variety of career paths after graduation, whether it be through full time employment, graduate school or other occupations.Although data on the senior’s post-graduation plans will not be available for another year, director of Undergraduate Career Services Bridget Kibbe said she expects the class of 2018 to be similar to the class of 2017.Within six months of graduation, 65 percent of the class of 2017 found full time employment, up from the 64 percent of the class of 2016, according to an email from Kibbe. 22 percent were enrolled in graduate or professional school, 7 percent were involved in a service program and 2 percent were serving in the military, also up from 1 percent from the previous year. 2 percent reported other plans and 2 percent were still seeking employment.“We can offer some of the organizations and company names that some members of the current class of 2018 have shared with us,” Kibbe said in an email. “The small sampling … certainly reflects the diverse interests and tremendous talents of our Notre Dame students.”Kibbe said the graduates with full time jobs will work with a wide variety of corporations, including jobs designing for Newell Rubbermaid, consulting for McKinsey or working for “The Late Show” with Stephen Colbert. Kibbe said she believes the Center for Career Development has adapted to meet the needs of a diverse student body with a variety of interests.“The new structure of our Employer Engagement team has allowed us to be much more intentional in locating new employers and organizations that match the diverse interests and talents of our students,” Kibbe said.Graduating senior Jack Cahill, a Program of Liberal Studies major with a business and economics minor, will be completing a business rotational program before being formally employed by Anheuser-Busch, a position he first learned about through the Center for Career Development.“What sparked this whole interest in the business rotational program was the Career Center and a meeting that I had there,” he said. “I went in for the industry specific appointment, and that was with Ray Vander Heyden. I can’t remember exactly what the industry I chose was, but it was sales, marketing, accounting, all that business stuff. He had direct experience working with business resumes, having connections with companies. It was more of a concrete, helpful discussion.”Cahill said he’s excited for the upcoming year because it will provide him with a fun introduction to the business world.“The first six weeks are going to be in St. Louis at their headquarters, and then there’s going to be a six-month rotation. There’s a capstone project that we present to some executives, and when that’s over, there’s a guaranteed offer at one of the offices,” he said. “It’s a general introduction to the company and what sales is. I’m going to be working in teams of five or six people, with kids my age, for a beer company. You know, it’s not a bad thing.”Graduating senior Paula Hastings, a neuroscience and behavior major with a minor in theology, is not planning on entering the work force just yet. Instead, she’s spending the next year volunteering with Bon Secours Volunteer Ministries, a Catholic volunteer network located in Baltimore, Maryland.Hastings said she found the organization last semester through a post-grad fair put on by the Center for Social Concerns. Though she met with many organizations and applied to three, she said she thought that Bon Secours Ministries was the right fit for her.“I found out I got into the program over spring break, and I committed right away. I knew I was going to be doing a service year since freshman year,” Hastings said. “I knew I this is the time in my life when I can dedicate an entire year to service before I get roped into a job or something.”Tags: 2018 Commencement, Center for Career Development, Commencement 2018, Commencement Issue 2018, employmentlast_img read more

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Women’s Care Center Foundation announced as 2019 Notre Dame Evangelium Vitae Medal recipient

first_imgThe Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture announced the Women’s Care Center (WCC) Foundation as the 2019 Notre Dame Evangelium Vitae Medal recipient in a press release Sunday.The Evangelium Vitae Medal is “the nation’s most important lifetime achievement award for heroes of the pro-life movement,” the release said. It is named after St. John Paul II’s encyclical of the same name, which was published in 1995 and focuses on “life issues.” Recipients are awarded a medal and $10,000.“The Women’s Care Center sets the standard nationwide for compassionate and comprehensive care for mothers, babies and families,” O. Carter Snead, the director of the Center for Ethics and Culture, said in the release. “In its work and witness, the Women’s Care Center embodies the unconditional love and radical hospitality that anchors and sustains a culture of life. It is our privilege to honor them with the Evangelium Vitae Medal.”The first WCC opened just south of the Notre Dame campus in 1984. Every year, more than 26,000 women visit one of its now 28 locations spanning across 11 states nationwide, according to the release. The facilities offer parental classes, counseling, education and “referrals for mother and baby wellness care” for women with unplanned pregnancies.University President Fr. John Jenkins serves on the board of the WCC Foundation. He praised the organization for its service to women with unplanned pregnancies.“The Women’s Care Center gives women in crisis the support they need for themselves and their children before and after birth,” Jenkins said in the release. “The WCC provides compassionate, non-judgmental, loving care to women most in need. They are a beacon of hope — here in South Bend and in every community they serve.”Ann Manion, volunteer president of the WCC Foundation, expressed gratitude for the University’s recognition.“Women’s Care Center is honored to be the recipient of this year’s Evangelium Vitae Medal,” she said in the release. “We are grateful to the University of Notre Dame for including us among the heroes of the pro-life movement who have received this award in the past. On behalf of our counselors, nurses, sonographers and the entire Women’s Care Center family, we are deeply grateful for this recognition, which will advance our life-saving mission to pregnant women in 11 states.”The recipients are announced on the first Sunday each October, which is designated as “Respect Life Sunday.” Last year, the Center for Ethics and Culture recognized Harvard Law professor Mary Ann Glendon with the 2018 Evangelium Vitae Medal.The Center for Ethics and Culture will present the award in a Mass and banquet April 27.Tags: Center for Ethics and Culture, Evangelium Vitae Medal, Women’s Care Centerlast_img read more

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