fzumllyepciz

GCA to host USA Global Cricket Academy

first_imgTHE Georgetown Cricket Association (GCA) will host the USA Global Cricket Academy’s Under-14 and Under-17 cricket teams from April 9 to 18, with a series of 50-over games.The tournament consists of 14 games.In an invited comment yesterday, GCA’s vice-president Azad Ibrahim revealed that the tournament is aimed at fostering a relationship between the GCA and their USA counterparts.Ibrahim also pointed out that the GCA will be looking at a return trip sometime next year, and also at a proposal where the event will be played on an annual basis.The visiting team will arrive in Guyana on April 8. USA Under-14 will play DCC on April 9, ECC on April 10, TSC/MSC Combined on April 12, GCC on April 13, President’s X1 on April 15, GCA X1 on April 16 and GYO on April 18.The visiting Under-17 team will compete against ECC on April 9, GCC on April 10, DCC, on April 12, TSC on April 13, Berbice on April 15, MSC on April 16, and GCA X1 on April 18.last_img read more

Read More

Syracuse midfielder Hayes McGinley suspended indefinitely after punching 2 people, arrest

first_img Published on March 22, 2015 at 4:14 pm Contact Sam: sblum@syr.edu | @SamBlum3 Facebook Twitter Google+ Related Stories Hayes McGinley’s lawyer said suspended SU midfielder had ‘no recognition’ of his actions that led to arrestWoman who says she was ‘sucker punched’ by Syracuse lacrosse player argues he deserves harsher punishmentcenter_img UPDATED: March 22 at 7:24 p.m.Syracuse redshirt freshman midfielder Hayes McGinley was suspended indefinitely from the team last Sunday for “a violation of team rules,” an SU Athletics spokesman said Sunday afternoon.McGinley, 20, was arrested on March 14 after he punched a woman, 20, and a man, 29, in the face, giving the woman a bloody lip, Syracuse Police Lt. Eric Carr said in an email. The arrest happened on the 100 block of Marshall Street at 11:03 p.m., according to a Syracuse police bulletin.The arrest occurred after the man observed McGinley, who was intoxicated, trying to get into the woman’s car. When the man tried to stop McGinley, McGinley punched him, Carr said.The woman then came over and got into an argument with McGinley. McGinley pushed the woman, she hit him and McGinley hit her back, giving her a bloody lip, Carr said.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textMcGinley was arrested on two charges of harassment in the second degree and held in the Onondaga County Justice Center overnight because he was intoxicated. He was arraigned the following day, Carr said.Harassment in the second degree is a violation and each count is punishable by a maximum fine of $250.McGinley played in the lacrosse team’s first four games and recorded three shots.“Our program and the athletic department have strict rules and expectations for the behavior of our student-athletes,” SU head coach John Desko said in a statement. “He did not meet those expectations.” Commentslast_img read more

Read More

Trojans look to upset rival Bruins in Pac-12 tournament

first_imgWith one conference win in 18 tries and a 6-25 record overall, the USC men’s basketball team didn’t achieve much success during the 2011-2012 regular season. In fact, in addition to finishing last in the Pac-12, the Trojans posted their worst win/loss percentage in school history and tied their 1977 counterparts for fewest victories in a single season.But on Wednesday, they’ll have a chance to start anew in their opening-round game of the Pac-12 tournament against UCLA. USC enters the tournament as the No. 12 seed, and the Bruins, who ended up as the No. 5 seed, are the highest-seeded team to not receive a first-round bye — finishing behind Washington, Cal, Oregon and Arizona, respectively.Upset minded · Though they are 6-25, freshman guard Byron Wesley and the Trojans believe they can be competitive against rival UCLA. – Corey Marquetti | Daily Trojan“I’m happy that’s how we get to start off, because we want to get a win against them,” sophomore forward Garrett Jackson said of UCLA. “We lost to them twice previously.”The Bruins (18-13, 11-7) first defeated USC on Jan. 15, by a score of 66-47, and beat them again on Feb. 15, 64-54. Guard Lazeric Jones led the team in scoring with an average of 13.4 points, 4.2 assists and 1.8 steals per game during the regular season. Jones also got plenty of help from his frontcourt — forward brothers Travis and David Wear both averaged more than 10 points per contest, as did center Josh Smith.“UCLA is playing the best they’ve played all year right now,” USC coach Kevin O’Neill said. “Let’s face it — when we go through warm-ups, it will be obvious which team should win the game. To me, other than North Carolina, they have the best frontline in the country.”The Trojans will attempt to counter UCLA’s talent with what’s left of their roster — USC only has six healthy players on scholarship. Still, O’Neill expects a spirited performance from his team.“I think our guys are going to be motivated just to play,” O’Neill said. “Regardless of who we’re playing on the other side, I would hope that our team responds with a great effort. And I think they will.”Jackson, who contributed 15 points, four steals and three blocks in his last matchup against the crosstown Bruins, knows what’s needed for his team to have a chance.“We definitely have to get in front of their post guys and limit their post touches,” Jackson said. “Put pressure on their outside guys, make it tough to get it inside.”O’Neill, meanwhile, offered a more general outline of what it might take to pull off an upset win.“If they’re on their game, it’s going to be difficult to beat them,” O’Neill said. “We’re going to try to do what we did over in their place and try to make it an eight-point game with five minutes left and hopefully steal one. That’s our goal and that’s what we’re going to have to do.”Tipoff is set for 2:30 p.m. at the Staples Center. The game will be broadcast on Fox Sports Net.last_img read more

Read More

USC women’s basketball falls to UCLA in Pac-12 Tournament quarterfinal

first_imgThe Trojans benefited from strong showings by a pair of veterans. Graduate guard Aliyah Jeune had 11 points in just her second game back after missing time with a knee injury, while senior forward Kayla Overbeck racked up her first double-double of the season with a 12-point and 13-rebound performance.  Rogers’ scoring performance marked the 20th time she has scored in double figures in just her first season at USC.  Freshman guard Endyia Rogers led USC with 18 points and five assists before fouling out of Friday’s quarterfinal matchup. (Ling Luo | Daily Trojan) Head coach Mark Trakh expressed pride in his team’s performance given the short turnaround following Thursday’s win against Colorado in the first round.  The Trojans dominated patches of the game, taking commanding leads at multiple stages, but the Bruins proved resilient, responding to every one of the Trojans’ runs with one of their own to keep the game close and ultimately pull away late. Along with Rogers, Pili led USC with yet another impressive showing. Despite the early foul trouble, Pili finished the afternoon with 11 points of her own — a solid performance yet a step back from her recent dominant outings.  Unfortunately for USC, the fortune swung back in UCLA’s favor in the final quarter. USC was outscored 27-14 and ultimately lost the game by 7.  USC’s Pac-12 Tournament ride came to an end in the second round Friday evening when a motivated Trojan team fell short against crosstown rival UCLA, dropping the matchup by a final score of 73-66. “Playing as hard as we had to play last night, we ran out of gas a little at the end there,” Trakh said.  “We just have to play through it, stay poised throughout everything and keep hooping,” Rogers said.  Onyenwere’s dominance and USC’s fouling issues proved to be too much for Trakh and co. to overcome. Both freshmen guard Endyia Rogers and forward Alissa Pili got into foul trouble early in the game to limit the Trojans’ ability to build upon their early lead.  Rogers eventually fouled out, leaving the Trojans without their leading scorer for the remaining three minutes of the fourth quarter. She finished the night with 18 points along with five assists.  UCLA was led by junior forward Michaela Onyenwere, who finished the evening with a game-high 26 points and 15 rebounds, presenting a big challenge for USC beneath the rim for the entire night. Onyenwere scored 18 of UCLA’s final 29 points. UCLA responded quickly and effectively, however, opening up the second frame on an 8-0 run before eventually taking a 37-36 lead into the halftime break.  Momentum swung like a pendulum during the contest. USC used an 11-0 run to stun UCLA out of the gate, leading to a 23-12 advantage coming out of the first quarter.  After being outscored by 12 in the second quarter, the Trojans turned their halftime deficit into a lead after outscoring the Bruins by 7 in the third.  The loss moves USC to 17-14 on the season, an encouraging mark considering the team’s slew of injuries and the inexperience within the young team’s regular rotation.  When asked about the officiating, which was controversial at times, Rogers was adamant about the importance of staying level-headed.  The Trojans will likely accept an invitation to the Women’s National Invitation Tournament and aim to conclude their season on a positive note. The selection and seeding of the field is expected to be announced before 9 p.m. March 16.last_img read more

Read More

6 of the Best – The Isle of Man Government’s Tony Jones

first_img This week’s edition of ‘6 of the Best’ comes from the Isle of Man’s eGaming Higher Executive Officer and long-suffering Ayr United fan Tony Jones.Read on to find out about historic derby victories for The Honest Men, being mugged in Bolivia and ‘messed up’ Rob Zombie flicks.Best HolidayIn 2011 and 2012 I was fortunate to go on an 18 month backpacking tour around Central and South America, Australasia, and overland from Beijing to Goa taking in many wonderful locations and experiences! Every day was an adventure, mostly good (but some bad like being robbed in Bolivia) and in the whole they were unforgettable times in amazing places!Best BookAnything by Iain M. Banks. His sci-fi novels are space opera at its finest. Surface Detail is probably my current favourite, the themes in it are fascinating, and for Banks fans the last line of the novel provides a wonderful surprise.  Best AlbumI love many types of music from genres such as rock, punk, blues, jazz, reggae, techno and drum & bass. I struggle to find enjoyment in opera and commercial pop. Techno is my favourite genre musically, some of the techno producers around are absolute masters of audio soundscaping, but if I could only have one album to listen to it would have to be Frank Zappa’s Joe’s Garage, an album that has brilliant music composition and a real funny storyline.Best Sporting ExperienceBeing an Ayr United and Scotland supporter I don’t have much to brag about! Any time we beat our derby team Kilmarnock fills me with joy, we drew them in cup matches four times between 1996 and 2001 and beat them each time, even though we were the lower league team. Beating them 3-0 when they were the cup holders was great. Looking back to when I was 7 yrs old (!) seeing Maradona score his first goal for Argentina was a special moment; unfortunately it was against Scotland at Hampden (1979).  Best FilmHouse of 1000 Corpses, directed by Rob Zombie. A great film with great characters, although beware, it is pretty messed up! Same goes for the sequel The Devil’s Rejects.Best BetBuying Ripple’s XRP at less than a cent each in 2014! Related Articles Submit Share Share 6 of the Best: Prophet’s Dean Sisun and Jake Benzaquen October 10, 2019 StumbleUpon 6 of the Best: Square in the Air’s Romilly Evans October 17, 2019 6 of the Best: All-in Diversity’s Kelly Kehn October 24, 2019last_img read more

Read More

March is ‘National Nutrition Month’ MidMichigan Medical Center Alpena Holds Monthly Diabetes Class

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisMarch is National Nutrition Month, and the staff at MidMichigan Medical Center Alpena are hosting classes to educate residents about diabetes.When you think of eating, diabetes is probably not the first thing that comes to mind.Maybe it’s the taste of the food, or how you prepared a meal, but with diabetes on the rise in America, the nutritional staff at MidMichigan Medical Center Alpena is trying to change that.The hospital is hosting a support group for diabetics and non–diabetics to learn about healthy eating habits. “The support group is a great way for people to share their ideas, their comments, their concerns and it’s kind of an open forum. So a lot of times people with the same health concerns have good ideas for others to take home,” Registered Dietitian, Paulette Feldhiser said.When it comes to nutrition, having a healthy outlook is key.“It’s having a healthy mindset so it’s not just about diet and nutrition it’s just the whole healthy approach to life. So it’s getting regular exercise as much as possible, making healthy food choices, managing stress and hectic schedules and just putting it all together, and recognizing we’re not all perfect either,” she explained.Eating the rainbow is key to having a healthy body. During the group sessions attendees learn how to eat foods that taste good while choosing more smarter options and seasonings.“I try to include food from variety of food groups, with different flavors and things that you maybe wouldn’t necessarily think to put together for a snack,” Feldhiser added.When it comes to change, some people may not be motivated that’s why the support group is always available for encouragement.“I would start off by encouraging them to seek a diabetes educational program. We have one here at the hospital. We have a registered nurse who is a diabetes educator and then myself a dietitian. We really try to work with people and help them establish good habits as far as diet, activity, and then also managing their medication, and treatment for their diabetes.And then get in a support group or get involved with a group of people who are sharing the same concerns that you are,” she said.If you would like to attend the monthly nutritional, diabetes informational session the class is held the last Tuesday of every month.In Alpena for WBKB News, I’m Star Connor.AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThis Tags: Diabetes, MidMichigan Medical Center, MidMichigan Medical Center Alpena, National Nutrition MonthContinue ReadingPrevious Spring Forward! It’s Daylights Savings TimeNext Read a Book, Win a Bike Contest Being Held in Rogers City for ‘National Reading Month’last_img read more

Read More

Local college honors graduates with virtual ceremony

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThis  ALPENA, Mich.— The end of the year commencement ceremony for graduates at Alpena Community College is going to be a lot different this year. ACC will host a virtual graduation program for students and their families which will air today.A total of 381 graduates from summer and fall 2019 and spring 2020 semesters will receive virtual recognition through a photo slideshow along with their name. The ceremony will also include speeches from ACC members as well as comments from students.ACC President Don MacMaster says, “This is the closure of a semester full of challenges and triumph.”The commencement video can be seen on the college’s Youtube channel this afternoon and at www.discover.alpenacc.eduAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisContinue ReadingPrevious APS seeking to hire AmeriCorps reading interventionistsNext ACC buildings remain closed through the end of Maylast_img read more

Read More

Baseball Voices: Gary Cohen on his 2,000th Mets TV game and his broadcasting journey

first_imgMORE: Watch ‘ChangeUp,’ a new MLB live whiparound show on DAZNTuesday night’s milestone game makes Cohen the perfect subject for this week’s Baseball Voices, SN’s series of in-depth conversations with the broadcasters who call the games we love on a daily basis.  SPORTING NEWS: You’re about to hit your 2,000th game as the TV voice of the Mets, which is kind of incredible. What does that mean to you, the idea that you’ve been on TV broadcasting the Mets for 2,000 games now? COHEN: Well, it means I’ve been showing up for work every day for a long time (laughs). Honestly, I didn’t even know that was the case. For me, and I’ve been very fortunate in this, it’s just a continuation of what I’ve been doing since I was 6 years old. I was a Met fan since 1964. I watched virtually every game when I was a kid and attended hundreds of games sitting in the upper deck at Shea Stadium. So what’s turned into my life’s work is really just a continuation of what began as a kid. SN: So when you were a kid, did you know you wanted to be a broadcaster? Did you call the games when you watched them? COHEN: No, initially I wanted to be a shortstop, but that didn’t work out because I had no talent. I also had an aspiration to be a power forward in the NBA, but I didn’t quite grow as much as I had hoped. So broadcasting was a nice fallback. I used to listen and watch a lot. I had an old-fashion radio in my room when I was 9 years old, and I found that you could find sports on that radio every night. I’d listen to Bob Murphy and Lindsey Nelson and Ralph Kiner doing the Mets, and Marv Albert doing the Knicks and the Rangers, and Al Albert doing the Nets. And you could find distance signals, find Chuck Thompson doing the Orioles and Ned Martin doing the Red Sox. I was fascinated by that. It never occurred to me that was something I could aspire to, but I very much was inspired by listening to all of those great announcers and finding that it was possible to hear games in my brain that I couldn’t actually see, which was very intriguing to me. SN: The magic of radio. COHEN: Yes. SN: Who were some of your favorite players on those Mets teams from in your childhood? Who did you love? COHEN: Well, Bud Harrelson was my guy. The little guy who overperformed, probably, his natural ability. I loved them all, but he was definitely special. SN: That’s cool. So at what point did broadcasting become an option? When you were in high school? College? When did you start to think “This is something I can do?”COHEN: Well, I went to the University of Pennsylvania my freshman year, and during orientation in the student newspaper there was a little ad that said, “If you’re interested in being the voice of the Quakers, come to this meeting.” And I showed up, and 64 people showed up at the same meeting. They said, “Well, if you want to do this, take a tape recorder, go to a game and, you know, and talk.” And I think only three people came to the next meeting. I took my little tape recorder and went to Penn versus Lafayette freshman football game and did my little screeching into the microphone. That was the first time I’d ever even thought about trying to make this happen. I still have that tape and it’s just so bloody awful. I keep it around to keep me humble. So I got to broadcast a little bit there at Penn, and then I transferred to Columbia my sophomore year and got to do a whole bunch of games, football and basketball and soccer and baseball. And, you know, I found that it was something that I enjoyed and something that I could see pursuing, even though I still had no idea that it was going to be possible to earn a living broadcasting games. But it was something that, hey, I found enjoyable. That was really the beginning of it. SN: I was going to ask you if you still had that tape, but you still do, obviously. Do you ever let anyone listen to it or is that just for you? COHEN: Oh, no. No, no, no. That could never happen. (Laughs)SN: Were you as enthusiastic in that first tape as you are now when you call Mets games these days? COHEN: I was pretty confused. I had a pretty significant speech impediment, a pretty thick New York accent. It’s pretty brutal. SN: So how did you overcome the speech impediment? COHEN: Well, the best thing that probably ever happened to me was during college, I took a job working at Sports Phone. In the pre-Internet and pre-ESPN days, that was the best way for people to get updated scores of games. It involves doing a 58-second tape of scores for up to 30 games, so you had to speak fast and clearly and accurately. And really, doing that, I think, was the best thing that happened to me in terms of cleaning up my speech. I also took a couple of a speech classes during college, which helped. But I think it was mostly just the more I did, the more I listened, the more I became conscious of the things that I needed to overcome. When young broadcasters are starting out, the best thing that they can do is be their own worst critic, and I think that’s often the best way to improve. SN: I grew up in St. Louis and I still remember the phone number to the SportsLine, they called. It was 321-1111. I called it every 10 minutes, sometimes. So as someone who grew up relying on that, thank you for what you did. It meant a lot. COHEN: There are a lot of us I know in New York who came through Sports Phone at one time or another. Guys like Howie Rose and Al Trautwig, then Sam Rosen. A lot of folks who went on to broadcasting in careers in New York started out at Sports Phone at some point.SN: That would be a great story, too. After Sports Phone, was Spartanburg your first professional job out of Columbia? COHEN: No. My first job out of college was as a news person at WTSL in Hanover, New Hampshire. I was the No. 2 person in a two-person news department that covered Hanover, Lebanon, New Hampshire and White River Junction, Vermont. Went to a lot of planning board and zoning board meetings. It was a chance to be on the radio regularly, but it was not exactly what I wanted. While I was there — we covered three towns but we only had one sports guy — when the teams got to the playoffs, I got to do a couple of playoff hockey games, which only started to whet my appetite. So I went from there to a sports job at WORD in Spartanburg, which was a rather amazing place. This guy named Bob Brown bought the station and decided to make this little 5,000-watt radio station, Spartanburg, South Carolina, into a powerhouse. So he hired these huge numbers of people to do 24-hour-a-day news and sports. It was pretty remarkable. I worked with a lot of really good people there and got to do innumerable high school football and basketball and baseball games. So that at least kept my hand in it. And we did, I don’t know, maybe a couple dozen minor-league baseball games for the Spartanburg Spinners, who were in the South Atlantic League. Mike Maddox and Lance McCullers Sr., are probably the most notable guys on that team. But I also got to see Cecil Fielder playing for the Florence Blue Jays, long before anybody knew who Cecil was. So that was my first taste of doing baseball and I found it extraordinarily difficult. At the time, I probably aspired more to be a basketball broadcaster because it was just more of an action sport, and I had always loved doing basketball in college. From Spartanburg, I moved to Norfolk, Virginia worked for WTAR in Norfolk, doing all sorts of radio tasks. But I also got to do some Division I basketball for the first time, filling in for Old Dominion. So that gave me a taste of that. And while I was in Norfolk, I got my first real full-time baseball job, in Durham in 1986. I took that job feeling very daunted by the idea of doing 1,200 innings solo. But I found after a few weeks in that job that baseball was really what I wanted to do, just the everyday nature of it, the soap-opera quality of connecting yesterday with today, last week with last year. And I found that all the baseball that I had watched and studied and read about over the years really served me well in that job. And so that became what I really wanted to pursue. SN: That’s awesome. Let’s skip ahead to your Mets life. What have you learned most from working with guys like Keith and Ron on regular basis? What do you get from your conversations with them? COHEN: I would go back further than that. My first 17 years with the Mets I worked on the radio.SN: Sure, sure. COHEN: The first 15 of those were with Bob Murphy. Murph was a classic, wonderful broadcaster. I learned from him about emphasizing the big moments. Baseball games can drag across hours, and you’re filling it with stories and details and things that might be extraneous to what’s actually happening in front of you. But when a big moment arrives, it has to be front and center. Murph taught me that more than anything else. Then my last two years on the radio I got to work with Howie Rose, who’s like my brother from another mother. That was very, very cool. We both grew up in Queens. We both grew up as Mets fans. We share a lot of the same sensibilities, and those two years were extraordinarily fun. Then I moved to SNY when the network began in 2006, and that’s when Keith (Hernandez) and Ron (Darling) and I started. It was very different for me, because I never worked with former players before. When you do radio, you’re the show. You’re the producer, the director, the color man, the play-by-play man. It’s kind of every job rolled into one, and on TV, it’s very different. You fill a small piece, a small spoke in a very large wheel, and it was not a given that the three of us were going to click the way we did. But I think the fact that we all arrived there not quite sure of ourselves really worked in our favor. I’d never really done TV before. Keith had only done a smattering of games. Ronnie had done one year in Washington when he was really just thrown into that at the last moment. So we were all kind of neophytes in our own way, and I think we all leaned on each other and I think what really has created the brotherhood and the partnership and the chemistry that ultimately has come to the surface. SN: I love the way you guys play off each other. It feels like a conversation I’ll have with friends. Do you guys hang out a lot outside of the booth too? COHEN: Sometimes, but I think our partnership is rooted in the ways that we come at things differently, while at the same time all having the same goal of entertaining and educating and enlightening and providing the captions for the games. I think the most important thing — and this is pretty incredible when you consider that we have a borderline Hall of Famer in Keith and a great, great pitcher in Ron — is that there are no egos in our booth. Nobody has to be the star of the show. Often when I listen, particularly three-men booths in other places, that sometimes it feels like there’s a struggle going on for who’s going to be the lead dog. And we just don’t have a lead dog. We have three guys who are all offering what they’ve got, all for the better good. And I think that works in our favor. SN: That’s cool. OK, now I’m going to give you four moments that you’ve been behind the mic for, and I want you to tell me what you remember most about those moments. The first one is the Endy Chavez catch in the NLCS. What sticks out to you all these years later? COHEN: Well, first of all, it was incredible that I was actually calling that moment because that was my first year doing TV in 2006. WFAN was kind enough to invite me to do an inning per game of the postseason that year, and that just happened to be the one inning I was behind the microphone. SN: Oh, wow. I didn’t realize that.COHEN: Yeah. What I remember is that I thought it was a home run. I remember Endy going up about as far as a human being could elevate in front of the fence, and how much of his arm — and he’s not a tall guy — was above the fence when he caught the ball, and that the force of the ball hitting the absolute tip of his glove almost took the glove right off his hand and flipped it into the bullpen. But somehow he caught that ball. I was as stunned as I’ve ever been calling a play because it just didn’t seem possible he could do that. SN: Speaking of being stunned by something, my next one is the Bartolo Colon home run. COHEN: People ask me about that one all the time, and what I tell them is this: There are certain things in baseball that you can prepare for. Someone’s coming up to a milestone or someone’s going to clinch a pennant and you may not script what you’re gonna say, but you have some idea that it’s coming. But the best moments are always the ones that come completely out of the blue. And the backstory of that moment is as important as the moment itself. The fact that Bartolo coming over from the American League, hadn’t swung the bat in years and looked like the guy off the street trying to swing the bat, either losing his helmet or flailing away. And that’s what had happened through most of his tenure with the Mets. He had gotten subtly better over the course of the months leading up to that, but it was still absurd to think that it was actually possible that he was going to hit a home run. I think you can hear the shock and awe in my voice and because again, who could ever prepare for something like that happening? SN: He crushed it, too. It wasn’t a wall scraper. I mean, he got ahold of that one. COHEN: Well, he’s a big, strong guy, but still.SN: OK. The next one is the Johan Santana no-hitter. COHEN: Again, the backstory is as important as the moment itself. I’ve been a Mets fan virtually from the beginning of the franchise, and the fact that the Mets had never thrown a no-hitter bordered on the absurd. They had had some of the greatest pitching of the previous half-century, from Tom Seaver and Dwight Gooden and David Cone and Frank Viola and Darling and Sid Fernandez and Al Leiter and all these guys who, on any given day, could have thrown a no-hitter. Mike Scott. All these guys who pitched for the Mets and went on and threw no-hitters for other teams.So for the Mets to have gone half a century without a no-hitter, it almost became part of the legend of the franchise. And for it to happen that night was rather shocking, too, because remember Santana was coming off shoulder problems. He had had a capsule surgery. They were trying to limit his pitch count. He walked a lot of hitters early in that game. It didn’t even seem, as the game progressed, that he was going to be allowed to finish, much less that he could. So there was the drama in that, too. And watching the agony on Terry Collins’ face as he kept sending him out there inning after running, knowing that it was against his better judgment. So all of that played into the ultimate reality of Santana completing the no-hitter. And it was great to see that he did it, too, because he was such a wonderful role model and the kind of guy that you want to be the guy who broke the no-hitter drought — that it not be some random guy who just has a big night because Santana was baseball royalty and you know, he may not have been quite the picture with the Mets that he was with the Twins, but he had had some real seminal moments with the Mets. For him to, I think you have to say, culminate his career because while he pitched for awhile after that, he was never quite the same. That was his last big moment and it’s great that he was the guy.SN: And the last one for this is the Wilmer Flores game. Not the home run he hit a couple of days later, but the game when everyone thought he was traded. How, as a broadcaster, do you try to handle a situation that’s as bizarre as that one was? COHEN: Yeah, well that’s a testament to the new reality of the way information travels. I follow Twitter during the game and I was seeing all these reports from credible sources that the trade was basically done. I have a whole different level of thinking about that because I had a lot of conversations with writers in the days afterward, and with people in front offices about the way this information is transmitted and the fact that clearly front offices leak to writers about trades that haven’t happened yet. It puts everybody in kind of an awkward position. It still bewilders me that it’s in anybody’s best interest, but you know, you’ve got good reporters with good sources and for whatever reason those sources are inclined to let that information leak out as things are happening. And so you get a situation like we had that night, where basically every credible writer in the country is saying that the deal was done, and Wilmer’s still out there on the field, and the fans in the stands all know this. Terry Collins doesn’t necessarily know this, so he leaves Wilmer in the game and Wilmer comes to find out from fans yelling at him that he’s been traded, and yet he’s still out there at his position. So it put everybody in an extraordinarily awkward situation. But because of the way Wilmer reacted, because he was so tied to the Mets; he’d signed as a 16-year-old and here he was eight years later and about to be traded from the only organization that ever known, and yet he’s standing there out there on the field and still playing. So he reacted in an extraordinarily human way. And I think that, in many ways, it tightened his bond with the Mets’ fan base, because he was demonstrating to them how much it meant to him to be there. It was a fascinating evening from a lot of standpoints. I think it only worked in Wilmer’s favor and made him a more popular player.SN: You know this as well as anyone, obviously, but the Mets are a franchise that everyone has opinions on, and they love to voice those opinions. You’re kind of the voice of the games for the franchise. Do you try to keep your opinions out? Do you try to inject some? How do you kind of approach that with a franchise that’s as interesting is the Mets are?COHEN: Well, I’ll say this: We are very fortunate that we work for a franchise that allows its broadcasters to be honest. You know, that’s not true everywhere. A lot of franchises would prefer that their broadcasters sugarcoat what’s going on in the field and what’s going on off the field. We’ve never had that mandate. We’ve always been told to tell the truth. So that gives us a lot of leeway to express opinions that you might not hear on another regional broadcasts. At the same time, we have a responsibility to be responsible and not to go off a half-baked. It’s a line that nobody has ever demarcated for us but we tend to credit and so when we have things that we need to say, we say them and we make them clear, we try not to belabor them. But if you listen to the broadcast on a regular basis, you have a pretty good idea how Keith and Ron and I feel about whatever issues are surrounding the Mets and baseball in general. SN: Definitely. You’ve called a lot of college basketball games, a lot of hockey in your career. Do you have a favorite non-baseball game, maybe a couple favorites, that you’ve been fortunate enough to call? COHEN: Oh, sure. I’ve done Seton Hall basketball for the last 16 years, and I love college basketball and I love that it also keeps me connected to radio, since I don’t get to do as much radio these days. When Seton Hall won the Big East championship in 2016 with Isaiah Whitehead, that was one of the greatest moments that I’ve ever called. I’ve done a lot of great college basketball moments, and that was certainly one of them. The other thing that I would say is, I got to do Olympic hockey for CBS Radio for ’92, ’94 and ’98, and ’98 was the first year that the NHL players played in the Olympics. The gold-medal game that year between the Czech Republic and Russia, that was an amazing event as well. So those would be the two that stand out. SN: Did you ever have a low point in your broadcasting journey, a time when you thought, “Am I doing the right thing?” On Tuesday night in Atlanta, Gary Cohen will be behind the mic for his 2,000th game as the TV play-by-play voice for the New York Mets. It’s an amazing accomplishment — he’s been the lead play-caller for SNY since the network was founded in 2006 — but only scratches the surface of his connection to the Mets. Before landing the TV job with SNY, Cohen was the radio play-by-play man for the Mets’ radio broadcasts from 1989 to 2005. And going even deeper, Cohen was a kid growing up in Queens who listened to Mets broadcasts on the radio and dreamed of what might be ahead in his future. Safe to say, 6-year-old Gary would love how things turned out.  COHEN: I went to Pawtucket in ’87 and I did two years there. I would say sometime in the middle of my second year in Pawtucket, there were thoughts. You know, I’d seen, traveling around in the International League, there were some guys who had been doing the International League for 20 years, and I knew that was not something that I was going to do. If things didn’t work out, I was going to have to find another path. So yeah, that year, in ’88, I definitely had some thoughts in that direction that maybe the law school applications would be going out soon. But fortunately that year, I got to fill in on a couple of big-league games. I did one for the Mets that year and one for the Orioles. And that, at least, gave me the encouragement to keep plugging away, and I was lucky enough that winter to get the Mets radio job. I never had to send in those applications. SN: I’m sure Mets fans are happy for that.COHEN: Well, I am, too.last_img read more

Read More

Dragons completed their Training in Athens (Video)

first_imgNational football team of BiH last night conducted the first training after arriving in Athens, where they will play in Sunday’s qualifying match for the World Cup in Russia in 2018 against the National team of Greece.Dragons arrived in Greece by charter flight from Sarajevo, and they performed their first training last night at the Olympic Stadium in Athens. As usual, the team led by head coach Mehmed Bazdarevic worked seriously in order to be well prepared for the match with the Greeks.Schalke defender Sead Kolasinac joined the team, who had health problems and fever. He was a little late because of the traffic in Athens, but he joined the training. Players greeted him with applause.Famous BH footballer Dusan Bajevic, also came on the training, and talked with coach Bazdarevic.Most importantly, there are no major problems with injuries in our team. This was confirmed by the main doctor of our team , Adnan Hadzimuratovic. He emphasized that he hopes that everything will be OK with Kolasinac, who trained last night.To recall, in Greece traveled: Asmir Begovic, Ibrahim Sehic, Kenan Piric, Toni Sunjic, Ognjen Vranjes, Emir Spahic, Sead Kolasinac, Ermin Bicakcic, Edin Cocalic, Ervin Zukanovic, Miralem Pjanic, Haris Medunjanin, Gojko Cimirot, Miroslav Stevanovic, Mato Jajalo, Edin Visca, Rade Krunic, Tino Sven Susic, Izet Hajrovic, Senad Lulic, Danijel Milicevic, Edin Dzeko, Vedad Ibisevic and Milan Djuric.The last training before the match with Greece, our Dragons will perform on Saturday at the Georgios Karaiskakis at 6:00 pm our time. On this stadium will be played Sunday’s match as well.Take a look at the video.(Source: D. B./Klix.ba)last_img read more

Read More

As expected, party-line split in Iowa delegation on impeachment vote

first_imgWASHINGTON — The three Iowa Democrats serving in the U.S. House voted to impeach President Trump tonight. Congressman Steve King, the only Iowa Republican in the delegation, opposed it. He said earlier this afternoon that Democrats were trying to undo the results of the 2016 election.“They brought this case November 9th, the day after Trump was elected,” King said.During a 90-second speech on the House floor, King also accused Democrats of pushing impeachment to divert attention from Joe Biden and Hillary Clinton’s actions.“And to go so far as to bring impeachment hearings to try and cover all of this up,” King said, “and I would take you back to October of 2015, when Barack Obama said Hillary Clinton would never intend to jeopardize our national security.”Republicans immediately criticized the two first-term congresswomen from Iowa who voted to impeach the president for abuse of power, suggesting Abby Finkenauer of Dubuque and Cindy Axne of West Des Moines had “destroyed” their chance at re-election in 2020.Axne said she stands behind her vote.“I never looked at the decision I had to make for this from a political perspective,” Axne said. “I wouldn’t be doing my job for the people in Iowa if that’s how I looked at my job. I looked at this from what’s best for our country and what my responsibilities are.”Axne said her vote was about responding to the president’s abuse of power.“I think it’s the right thing to do,” Axne said. “I wouldn’t have done it if all the facts hadn’t led to that.”Finkenauer, in a written statement issued before the vote, said she had a duty to respond to an abuse of power at the highest level. Congressman Dave Loebsack, a Democrat from Iowa City who is not seeking re-election, is the other member of the Iowa delegation who voted for the two articles of impeachment. In a written statement issued Tuesday, Loebsack said President Trump’s actions cannot be allowed to stand as an example for future leaders.Both of the Republicans who represent Iowa in the U.S. Senate are criticizing the House vote. Senator Joni Ernst tweeted last night that Democrats “have been heck bent on impeaching (Trump) since day 1.” Senator Chuck Grassley issued a written statement. He accused Democrats of advancing the first “partisan impeachment” of a president in modern history.The Iowa Democratic Party’s chairman tweeted that he was proud of the three Iowa Democrats in the House “for showing that no one, not even (Trump), is above the law.”last_img read more

Read More