Category: eeyjgvgwbaeh

Traffic Advisory Cumberland Co Highway 104 Cobequid Pass

first_imgMotorists are advised that both sides of the Cobequid Pass are blocked with vehicles trying to get up the hill to the toll plaza. Tractor trailors are blocking the approaches to the toll plaza on either side, preventing other vehicles from proceeding. Motorists should expect delays and are asked to take a different route. Transportation staff on on the scene to help remove the vehicles.Empty, high-sided vehicles are encouraged to take Trunk 4 due to high winds. Check 511 for updates. -30-last_img read more

Weekly Traffic Advisories

first_img LUNENBURG COUNTY: Varner Bridge Work is underway on a new bridge beside the existing Varner Bridge on Route 208 near New Germany. The bridge is open during construction, but there may be occasional, brief closures during normal construction activities. Drivers should use extra caution in the area. The new two-lane bridge will be completed this year. INVERNESS COUNTY: Trunk 4 – Port Hastings Rotary Starting Monday, March 4, Trunk 4 at the Port Hastings Rotary will have partial lane closures during the installation of an overhead sign. The work will last until the end of March. INVERNESS COUNTY: Crowdis Bridge Crowdis Bridge is closed until further notice for repairs. A detour is available via Crowdis Cross Road, West Big Interval Road and Hatchery Road. PICTOU COUNTY: Bridge Work, Brookville Road Work is taking place on two bridges over McLellans Brook on Brookville Road in Pictou County so vehicles can carry oversized loads of wind turbine components to Irish Mountain. Work has begun on the bridge near the intersection of Brook Road. It will continue to have two-lane traffic, but delays are possible. Work on the bridge near the intersection of Willard Fraser Road has begun. Traffic will be limited to one-lane and controlled by traffic signals. Work on both bridges will be finished by Sunday, March 15. CUMBERLAND COUNTY: Eddy Road Eddy Road to Fort Lawrence, near Amherst, is closed until further notice. COLCHESTER/HANTS COUNTIES: Highway 102, Shubenacadie River Construction is taking place on Highway 102 at the bridges over the Shubenacadie River until September. Traffic is moving in both directions, however drivers are urged to travel with extra caution in the area. VICTORIA COUNTY: Gillis Bridge Gillis Bridge on North Branch Road, just past Uisge Ban (USH-AK BAHN) Falls Provincial Park, is closed until further notice. Access to the park is not affected. -30- GUYSBOROUGH COUNTY: Melford Brook Bridge The Melford Brook Bridge, on Route 344 at Middle Melford, is closed. A two-lane detour bridge is in place until a permanent bridge is built. The speed limit is reduced to 60 km/h and warning signs are in place. KINGS COUNTY: Whitman Bridge Whitman Bridge, on Whitman Road between Maple Avenue and Ward Road in Aylesford, is closed for repairs until further notice. The detour route is Maple Avenue, Victoria Road, and Ward Road. DIGBY COUNTY: Melanson Mills Bridge Melanson Mills Bridge on Marc Comeau Road is closed until further notice to replace the deck. A detour route is in place. NEW WORK INVERNESS COUNTY: West Lake Ainslie Road The Hayes River Bridge on West Lake Ainslie Road has a 15-tonne weight restriction. CONTINUING WORKlast_img read more

Déclaration du ministre Zach Churchill

first_imgAujourd’hui 26 mars, la Commission sur l’intégration dans l’éducation a publié son rapport intitulé « Nos élèves, notre avenir ». Il s’agit de la première fois en vingt ans que le modèle de l’intégration dans les salles de classe est évalué. Le rapport est réfléchi et complet, et il démontre clairement que les membres de la commission s’étaient engagés à trouver un modèle d’intégration qui accorde la priorité aux élèves. Tout comme les membres de la commission, le gouvernement s’est engagé entièrement à adopter une approche axée sur les élèves envers l’éducation, ainsi qu’un modèle d’intégration dans les salles de classe qui est efficace. La commission a souligné que nous devons adopter une approche basée sur les besoins pour pouvoir offrir un modèle qui favorise réellement l’intégration dans l’éducation. Dans le cadre de ce modèle, nous offrirons un plus grand soutien et davantage de perfectionnement professionnel aux éducateurs et du financement supplémentaire pour les spécialistes en matière de comportement, de santé et d’éducation afin d’aider les élèves et les enseignants. La commission nous a demandé de travailler avec nos partenaires dans le système d’éducation et au sein du gouvernement pour unifier notre système et notre approche afin d’assurer la réussite de tous nos élèves, peu importe leurs besoins. Nous acceptons les grands objectifs du rapport et nous devons maintenant collaborer avec nos partenaires pour examiner les recommandations de plus près et mettre en place des changements d’ici septembre. Notre travail a commencé par le programme de prématernelle, qui donne aux éducatrices de la petite enfance une occasion de déterminer quels enfants ont besoin de soutien et quelles mesures de soutien sont nécessaires avant le début de la vie scolaire des enfants. Nous adopterons également les recommandations du rapport de Mme Avis Glaze intitulé « Relever la barre » qui offre un plan pour des bases plus solides sur lesquelles on peut miser pour apporter d’autres changements proposés par la Commission pour l’intégration dans l’éducation et le Conseil pour l’amélioration des conditions en salle de classe, au profit de tous les élèves. Le rapport de la commission et le rapport de Mme Glaze mettent le système d’éducation au défi de s’unifier pour atteindre un objectif unique, soit d’aider tous les enfants à réussir, peu importe où ils sont dans la province et peu importe leurs besoins. Le gouvernement a prévu 15 millions de dollars dans le budget de cette année pour créer un nouveau modèle d’intégration dans l’éducation afin d’appuyer les nombreux changements qui sont en cours. Nous allons maintenant lire le rapport plus attentivement et nous collaborerons avec nos partenaires du Syndicat des enseignants de la Nouvelle-Écosse et au sein du gouvernement, y compris le comité sur les programmes et les services d’éducation spéciale, les directeurs généraux des écoles, les directeurs d’école et le Conseil pour l’amélioration des conditions en salle de classe afin de déterminer les prochaines étapes. Je remercie sincèrement la Dre Sarah Shea, Monica Williams et Adela NJie pour leur travail ardu, leur professionnalisme et leur expertise sur cette question sensible et importante qui touche la vie des élèves et de leurs familles. -30-last_img read more

US consumer confidence tumbles in December

first_imgWASHINGTON — U.S. consumer confidence tumbled this month as Americans began to worry that economic growth will moderate next year. But consumer spirits are still high by historic standards.The Conference Board, a business research group, says its consumer confidence index fell to 128.1 in December, down from 136.4 in November and lowest since July.The index measures consumers’ assessment of current economic conditions and their outlook for the next six months. Both fell in December. Consumers’ expectations for the future dropped to the lowest level in more than two years.The U.S. economy is healthy. Unemployment is the lowest in nearly five decades. But the Federal Reserve has gradually been raising interest rates, financial markets have been volatile and global growth is slowing.Paul Wiseman, The Associated Presslast_img read more

Oil sands giants granted more time for cleanup after missing targets

EDMONTON — Alberta’s energy industry has found that cleaning up oil sands tailings is much harder than it thought.The province’s energy regulator says all oil sands companies affected by tailings reduction rules missed what were supposed to be legally binding targets — some by wide margins. All were given extra years to meet reductions that should have been done by now.[np_storybar title=”Tight oil helps Alberta solidify energy superpower status” link=”https://business.financialpost.com/2013/06/06/alberta-tight-oil-solidifies-superpower-status/?__lsa=6fe6-6eed”%5DWhile the oil sands grab all the headlines, conventional oil from Alberta is also likely to emerge as a strong contributor, cementing the province’s position as an energy — albeit landlocked — superpower, leaving other provinces in the dust. Read more. [/np_storybar]“It’s tougher than they thought,” Terry Abel of the Energy Resources Conservation Board said Tuesday. “It’s tougher than we thought, too.”Reclaiming mine tailings has been one of the industry’s major environmental challenges. Much of that waste material is composed of particles so fine they take years or even decades to settle out of tailings ponds. Without a way to hasten the process, oil sands tailings ponds have grown from 50 square kilometres in 2006 to 176 square kilometres now.In 2009, the board released regulations that were developed in consultation with industry and were designed to force energy companies to produce fewer tailings. By this year, operators were supposed to be removing at least half of those fine particles from their waste water and storing them so that they’d be firm enough to support a vehicle within a year.But a recent report, which covers up to the end of 2012, found that none of the four licensed operators that so far come under the regulation was on track to meet that goal.Suncor, supposed to be removing 30% of its particles, was capturing 8.5% of them. Syncrude’s Mildred Lake project was removing 8.8% of the 12% required — although it exceeded targets in previous years.Shell’s Muskeg River and Jackpine projects, on the hook for 23.5 and 15.5% removals respectively, were at 8.8% and zero.Five other oil sands licensees are either not yet producing or haven’t been producing long enough to be required to report their removals.The energy conservation board has given most operators, including those who aren’t yet reporting, until the end of 2015 to meet the 50% guideline.Some, such as Imperial Oil’s Kearl and Shell’s Muskeg River projects, have until 2016. Canadian Natural Resouces Ltd. gets until 2017.New, unproven technologies just aren’t up to speed yet, said Abel.Some operators, such as Suncor, hoped to dry thin layers of tailings in the sun, but have found the weather unco-operative.“(Our system) is still a relatively new technology in the early stages of development and commercialization,” said spokeswoman Sneh Setal. “Since the first trial back in 2008, we’ve learned a great deal about the practical challenges of implementing (it) on a commercial scale.”Syncrude had reliability problems with a tailings facility that prevented it from meeting its 2012 targets, said spokeswoman Cheryl Robb.“We’re pretty proud of the plan we’ve put together,” Robb said. “We recognize we have more work to do.”Companies have promised to catch up by removing a higher percentage of particles in future years. But the board notes that the longer the wait, the harder the catch-up.“Delaying the previously approved annual fines capture will make achieving the required cumulative fines capture in later years much more difficult,” says its analysis of the plan from Canadian Natural Resources.No enforcement has been taken against any of the companies. Abel said operators have been working hard to meet the goals, collaborating on best practices and spending billions on tailings reductions.“The big issue is that despite all of those efforts, they’re running into problems making that work within those complex operations,” Abel said. “We found that both they and ourselves were probably aggressive in setting those targets and believing we could get those performances as quickly as we were hoping.”Enforcement is a possibility if operators still aren’t meeting their goals after the next report, expected in two years.“We fully expect … if they don’t make progress on those operations, we’ll take action against them in the future,” said Abel.That’s not good enough, said Jennifer Grant of the Pembina Institute, a think-tank focused on developing innovative sustainable energy solutions.She points out that the board had already allowed operators some flexibility on deadlines, even though regulations were written with industry input.“There’s been a real shift in terms of that original thinking and what we’re seeing today.”Grant suggested there are many new tailings technologies available and answers are probably nearer than industry suggests.“I don’t think addressing tailings is an insurmountable technical challenge. Operators could meet the tailings directive. It’s really a question of whether they’ll be forced to.” read more

Brocks Wellness Day recognized with award

Brock University has been awarded a certificate of merit in Canada’s Healthy Workplace Month 2012 in the best practices category for its annual staff Wellness Day.The University was one of five workplaces with more than 500 employees recognized in the competition sponsored by Canada’s Healthy Workplace Month, a year-round program that encourages workplaces to promote healthy practices throughout the year.Winners are chosen based on the quality of the submission, creativity, uniqueness and staff involvement.Brock’s Wellness Day is organized by Environment, Health and Safety and the Brock Wellness Committee.Brock’s submission to the competition will be featured on the Canada’s Healthy Workplace Month website until October 2013. read more

Man treated for smoke inhalation in Hamilton house fire

One person has been treated for smoke inhalation following a house fire in Hamilton’s Gibson neighbourhood.Firefighters were called to a home at Sanford Ave. and Barton St. E around 8 p.m. Wednesday.Officials say the blaze started in the kitchen.It quickly spread to the attic and damaged part of a neighbouring home.Firefighters found evidence of hoarding inside the home and it was declared uninhabitable.

Genivar says its global expansion wont be hampered by Quebec corruption cloud

MONTREAL – Genivar Inc. says ambitious plans to expand its engineering and construction consulting business won’t be hampered by the corruption cloud that’s hanging over Quebec’s construction industry.Chief executive Pierre Shoiry said Thursday that he welcomes efforts by the provincially-appointed Charbonneau commission to help remove the negative public perception that hangs over the industry.“Anything that the government can do to improve the perception of the public and the confidence of the public towards our industry, I support totally,” he said after the company’s annual meeting.The inquiry, which was formally launched this week and begins hearings next month, was called to examine alleged links with criminal groups and corruption.Shoiry said Genivar (TSX:GNV) hasn’t been called upon to testify and has taken all the appropriate measures to ensure its employees “work in an ethical way and according to the laws.”While the inquiry is expected to expose problems for the Quebec industry, Genivar said the information shouldn’t scare off potential acquisition targets from joining the company.“The people appreciate what they see at Genivar. We’ve had so far over 50 acquisitions since the IPO and I’d say right now our best references are the acquisitions that we’ve made.”The Montreal-based engineering and construction consultant wants to boost its annual revenues to $1.5 billion within three years, primarily through acquisitions in Canada and around the world.That would boost its workforce of 5,500 to nearly 14,000, including half from outside Canada.Its efforts have attracted the financial support Canada’s two largest pension fund managers. The Canada Pension Plan Investment Board and Caisse de depot et placement du Quebec have each acquired a 10 per cent stake in Genivar for $80 million.In 2011, Genivar added 10 companies and earned $50 million on $651.9 million of revenues.Earlier this month, Genivar missed expectations again by reporting that its earnings in the first quarter fell to $10.1 million on higher acquisition-fuelled revenues.Meanwhile, Shoiry said Genivar hasn’t won contracts at the expense of its larger rival SNC-Lavalin (TSX:SNC), whose reputation has been tarnished by a police investigation and the discovery of $56 million of undocumented payments.“We’ve never counted on problems with other firms to grow our business,” he said, noting that Genivar’s business model is different since it doesn’t do construction.It is a “pure play design firm” with a low-risk model.“You’ll never hit a home run but you’ll never wipe out either,” Shoiry added.After an independent SNC investigation issued a series of recommendations to improve its internal controls, Genivar said it examined its own policies and found they fully complied.Genivar expects its Canadian operations will grow by 10 to 15 per cent through organic sales and acquisitions over the next few years.It is targeting Atlantic Canada, Western Canada and Ontario to further reduce its dependence on Quebec. Its home province accounts for 47 per cent of revenues, down from 90 per cent when it went public in 2006.It is also targeting opportunities in industrialized countries such as the United States, France and Commonwealth countries such as Australia and Britain.“We’re looking for industrialized countries that have similar industry models than we have here in Canada and we believe that right now there are good opportunities to do this global expansion,” he said.Some markets have become depressed, presenting opportunities to buy reputable firms.It has no interest in Eastern Europe, Portugal or Spain.“Our strategy has never been to look at turnaround companies or bad companies, we’re looking for good companies and obviously in our international strategy we’re looking for bigger acquisitions.”The recent acquisition of a Colombian firm with about 400 employees is a good model of its expansion plans.It is targeting companies in emerging markets that have geopolitical stability but doesn’t want these investments to generate more than 10 per cent of overall revenues.“Right now our main focus is some emerging markets but mostly industrialized countries.”On the Toronto Stock Exchange, Genivar shares fell six cents at $24.13 in Thursday trading. Genivar says its global expansion won’t be hampered by Quebec corruption cloud AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email by Ross Marowits, The Canadian Press Posted May 24, 2012 5:00 pm MDT read more

Microsoft firstquarter profit falls 22 per cent ahead of Windows 8 launch

Microsoft first-quarter profit falls 22 per cent ahead of Windows 8 launch by News Staff Posted Nov 2, 2012 6:28 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email NEW YORK, N.Y. – Microsoft Corp.’s net income fell 22 per cent in the latest quarter as it deferred revenue from the sale of its upcoming Windows 8 operating system to PC makers — and as PC sales in general took a dive.The economic troubles in Europe also weighed on results, which missed Wall Street expectations.The software company said Thursday that net income was $4.47 billion, or 53 cents per share, in the fiscal first quarter, which ended Sept. 30. That was down from $5.7 billion, or 68 cents per share, a year ago.Analysts were on average expecting 56 cents per share, according to FactSet.Revenue fell 8 per cent to $16 billion, missing the average analyst estimate of $16.5 billion.Microsoft’s stock initially fell more than 3 per cent in extended trading after the release of the results but recovered to $29.04, which was 46 cents, or 1.5 per cent, below its price at the close of regular trading.Analyst Collin Gillis at BGC Financial said executives reassured investors on a conference call, noting that trends in Microsoft’s Server and Tools business, which has been the fastest-growing division, were better than they appeared at first glance.That division makes software for servers and software developers, and is moving from licensing it out program by program to striking multi-year licensing deals. That’s curbing the growth rate for now but sets the company up for better performance in the future, Gillis said.Analysis of the Windows results were complicated by the deferral of $783 million in license fees for PCs pre-loaded with Windows 8. Microsoft, which is based in Redmond, Wash., can’t recognize the revenue until the units go on sale on Oct. 26.It also deferred $384 million in license fees from PCs that shipped with Windows 7 but are eligible for a $15 upgrade to Windows 8, and $189 million for the PCs that shipped with the new version of Office or are eligible for an upgrade.Excluding those deferrals and other adjustments, net income was $6.66 billion, or 65 cents per share, down 7 per cent from last year. Revenue was flat with last year’s figure at $17.3 billion.Excluding the deferrals, revenue for the Windows division fell 9 per cent from a year ago, roughly in line with the decline in global PC shipments in the third quarter reported by research firms Gartner and IDC. Consumers held off buying PCs ahead of Windows 8 and probably steered some of their electronics dollars toward tablets and smartphones.Windows 8 is the most significant revamp since Windows 95 and sports a completely new look that’s intended to be consistent across PCs, tablets and smartphones. It’s designed from the ground up for touch-sensitive screens, and Microsoft has high hopes that it will keep Windows relevant in a world where tablets are starting to eat into PC sales. It’s also making its own tablets for the first time, and is set to launch them along with Windows 8.In the Business Division, Microsoft’s largest, posted a 1 per cent increase in revenue, excluding the deferrals for Office. read more

Raspberry Pi turned into shared network display using VNC

first_imgVirtual Network Computing, better known as VNC, is something most geeks have stumbled across and used during their time sat in front of a PC. It allows for the control of other, remote machines by transmitting the keyboard and mouse input from one to the other while showing the user the output from the other machine.VNC offers up another mode, however, which allows the output of one machine to be displayed on another for others to watch rather than interact with. It’s called listen mode, and computer programmer Rob Hague has managed to get it working on the Raspberry Pi $25 PC using VNC Viewer.Being able to just watch what is happening on the screen in front of you may not sound too exciting, but then you have to remember Raspberry Pi is first and foremost aimed at the education sector. Using this VNC solution you could easily have a teacher demonstrating something on a PC with all the students viewing it through their Raspberry Pi rather than straining to see a projection at the front of the class.With my limited knowledge of VNC I assume that is possible, but even if it isn’t the system still allows one-on-one screen viewing and switching with each student if they need to see how something is done. It also works with any OS that can run VNC, meaning Windows, Mac, and Linux hosts work.Hague achieved the demonstration you see in the video below by getting TightVNC loaded and working on the Raspberry Pi. For the Mac, he used Vine Server as the built-in solution OS X Lion relies on “doesn’t support reverse connections.” Both pieces of software are free to use, meaning this will hopefully work for everyone from the day the $25 PC ships.As you can see, there is some lag, but it’s minor. Also, it’s being run on an alpha board, not the final hardware, so performance is sure to improve upon release.More at Rob Hague’s Blog, via Raspberry Pilast_img read more

Every Greek is an ambassador for Greece

first_imgI am a Greek, who was born in Egypt and who migrated to Australia with my parents at age seven. I always had the strong sense that I am Greek and I have always been proud of that. It was mainly my parents who cultivated this love for my country from a young age, however, I believe that what also played a big role is the fact that we lived, and still live, far from our country of origin. This has created the need to become more connected with our culture. I grew up in Melbourne, studied psychology, became a psychologist, and now work in the field of Human Resources (Organisational Development) which specifically focuses on the development of strategic programs that increase employee effectiveness and which improve organisational performance. My hobby is music and my favourite instrument which I have been playing for ten years is the touberleki. I currently perform regularly at private and public events and I also teach drumming to Greek and non-Greek students of all ages. Who are the Greek ambassadors and how did this group begin? What has been particularly troubling me in recent times are the problems that Greece is facing. My dream would be to see Greece overcome these problems and one day return to her old glory. For several months, I have had many conversations with Greek Australian friends on how we as Greeks of abroad can help Greece in its current crisis. One night I had the vision that Every Greek is an Ambassador for Greece, and that we all have a role to play to help our country. So I decided to start the initiative Greek Ambassadors, with the aim of creating a sense of pride in every Greek for their country, regardless of their geographic location, and to encourage positive action for helping Greece. The initiative’s main purpose is to unite all Greeks, creating a network between Greeks in Greece and of the diaspora, encouraging action and discouraging apathy. The Greek Ambassadors will determine what the critical needs are and how we can work together more closely to deal with these difficulties, whilst also supporting our fellow countrymen who have lost their jobs, their wages and their self-esteem. While the first ambassadors formed in Melbourne, our group has expanded very quickly around world through facebook, reaching approximately one thousand five hundred members within only a few months. So far, we have explored some ideas and one of the activities we are planning is a fundraiser to support those who are suffering and most in need, through Greek charitable organisations. Our group also believes that it is important that we respond to negative portrayals of Greece in the media, and so far we have responded through making formal complaints against such reporting. How you can become a Greek Ambassador? Shortly, we will be announcing more details about our fundraiser and other activities, and we invite all Greeks of Australia to take part, as their success relies on the help of all of us. If you would like to join the group Greek Ambassadors you can contact us through facebook (Evy Yannas or Νικος Κολενδριανος), or via email eyannas@hotmail.com or changez@live.com.au. We all have the opportunity to be part of something special by becoming a Greek Ambassador. It is very important that we understand the tremendous power and potential that we have as Greeks. It is a fact that our population abroad is about the same as that in Greece. What other nationality can make that claim? We need to realise our potential and to unite through this common purpose. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

Large Hadron Collider Shut Down For 2Year Upgrade

first_imgThe world’s largest and most powerful particle collider is shutting down for two years.All experiments by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are on hold while the complex receives “major improvements and upgrading.”Operators on Monday turned off the machine, ending its “very successful” second run—during which the LHC collected “an enormous amount” of data, more than 300 million gigabytes of which is now permanently archived by CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research).In layman’s terms, that’s about 1,000 years of 24/7 video streaming.“The second run of the LHC has been impressive, as we could deliver well beyond our objectives and expectations, producing five times more data than during the first run,” according to Frédérick Bordry, CERN director for accelerators and technology. “With this second long shutdown starting now, we will prepare the machine for even more collisions” at a higher energy level.During the two-year break, known as Long Shutdown 2 (LS2), the accelerator complex and detectors will be reinforced and upgraded in preparation for its next run in 2021, as well as the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, which will begin after 2025.This isn’t a vacation for CERN scientists, though.While the Large Hadron Collider gets spruced up, physicists will comb through data from its second run, looking for “very rare processes,” Eckhard Elsen, director for research and computing, said in a statement.“They will be busy throughout the shutdown examining the huge data sample for possible signatures of new physics that haven’t had the chance to emerge,” he explained. “This will guide us into the HL-LHC when the data sample will increase by yet another order of magnitude.”It took CERN—in collaboration with more than 10,000 scientists from 100-plus countries—10 years to build the largest machine in the world. The LHC lies some 574 feet beneath the France-Switzerland border near Geneva, where scientists test predictions of particle physics theories.Following its first data-taking period from 2010 to 2013, the accelerator was taken offline and upgraded over two years, restarting again in early 2015 for a second research run.“In addition to many other beautiful results, over the past few years the LHC experiments have made tremendous progress in the understanding of the properties of the Higgs boson,” CERN Director-General Fabiola Gianotti said in a statement.Named after physicist Peter Higgs (one of the scientists who proposed the mechanism), the Higgs boson was discovered at CERN in 2012. It has been studied ever since, analyzed for the way it decays or transforms into other particles.“The Higgs boson is a special particle, very different from the other elementary particles observed so far,” Gianotti added. “Its properties may give us useful indications about physics beyond the Standard Model.”Other LHC experiments have produced a wide range of results and hundreds of scientific publications, including the discovery of exotic new particles.Proton beams will resume in spring 2021, with the LHC’s third run.More on Geek.com:Large Hadron Collider Shuts Down, Weasel to BlameThe Large Hadron Collider Has Been Recreated in LEGOScientists Prank CERN With Fake Human Sacrificelast_img read more

FA plead for information after cocaine abuse reports

first_imgThe FA has released a statement on Friday reiterating their stance on drug use among footballers after reports alleged cocaine use by an England international.Newspaper reports on Thursday claimed that an England international took cocaine during a pre-Christmas team party, but the identity of the player has been sealed.The FA, however, refused to respond specifically to the claims, but have implored anyone with evidence of allegations of drug use to contact them or the UK Anti-Doping (UKAD).“The FA operates one of the most comprehensive national anti-doping programmes in the world.” An FA spokesperson told Sky Sports.“In partnership with UK Anti-Doping, we have targeted research and intelligence-led programme in place to identify potential doping risks in the game.LONDON, ENGLAND - MAY 19: Antonio Conte, Manager of Chelsea sprays his team with Champagne following his sides victory in The Emirates FA Cup Final between Chelsea and Manchester United at Wembley Stadium on May 19, 2018 in London, England. (Photo by Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images)Religious leaders are happy after FA’s champagne ban Manuel R. Medina – April 24, 2019 The traditional celebration will change starting this year after the Football Association has abandoned the tradition of awarding the winners with a case of champagne.“Although incidents of doping in English football are very rare, it remains a priority for The FA to find and sanction anyone found taking performance-enhancing or recreational drugs.“We encourage anyone with information about any anti-doping violation in football to report it to The FA, via anti-doping@thefa.com, or to UK Anti-Doping by visiting: www.reportdoping.com.”last_img read more

Syphilis rise alarms county health officials

first_imgClick to enlarge o Primary syphilis: The first symptom of syphilis is a single, raised sore called a chancre. It usually appears on the genitals, mouth or rectum about three weeks after exposure. The sore is painless and can last for several weeks and go away by itself. However, without treatment, the disease can progress to the next stage.o Secondary syphilis: This stage typically starts with a reddish-brown, spotted rash on one or more areas of the body. The rash, which most often occurs on the palms of the hands or soles of the feet, usually does not itch. The rash can appear as the chancre is healing or several weeks after the sore is gone. The rash can come and go for up to two years. Other symptoms during this stage may include swollen lymph nodes, fever, fatigue, patchy hair loss, weight loss and headache. These symptoms usually last two to six weeks and will clear up with or without treatment.o Latent syphilis: The latent stage begins when symptoms from the secondary stage disappear. During this stage, the disease shows no signs or symptoms; it can only be detected by blood test. A relapse of secondary syphilis can occur during the first two years of latency. Without treatment, latent syphilis continues for life and may progress to the final stage.o Tertiary (late) syphilis: Tertiary syphilis can cause paralysis, mental problems, blindness, deafness, heart failure and even death. Though treatment at this stage will cure the disease and stop future damage, it cannot repair or reverse the damage that occurred before treatment.A fairly uncommon sexually transmitted disease is becoming more common in Clark County, causing concern among local health officials.The number of syphilis cases in Clark County through the first seven months of 2012 has nearly doubled the 2011 total. The increase led Dr. Alan Melnick, Clark County health officer, to issue a health advisory to local physicians and other health care providers.last_img read more

Woman hit by 2 cars dies almost a week after crash

first_imgPLANTATION, FLA. (WSVN) – A woman who was hit by two cars, last Wednesday, has died.Family members of the victim said she died, Tuesday, in the ICU at Broward Health Medical Center.Last Wednesday, a driver stayed at the scene on Pine Island Road in Plantation. However, the second one fled the scene.Plantation Police have upgraded charges against the driver who fled to manslaughter.If you have any information on this hit and run, call Broward County Crime Stoppers at 954-493-TIPS. Remember, you can always remain anonymous, and you may be eligible for a $3,000 reward.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

The 2020 Jaguar XE gets facelifted inside and out for Geneva

first_imgJaguar will use the upcoming Geneva Motor Show to reveal the 2020 XE, the first major refresh of the sedan since it entered production in 2015. In addition to a new look inside and out, Jaguar announced Tuesday that the car has long list of new technologies this year.Enlarge ImageThe subtle facelift makes the XE look a little fresher. Jaguar The visual changes for the 2020 Jaguar XE primarily involve new front and rear bumpers, a new grille and new lights. It’s “all about building on the undeniable sporting proportions of the original car,” Jaguar Director of Design Ian Callum said in a statement. To that end, the grille is wider with a new mesh design, the front bumper has been restyled, and the standard LED headlights now have “J-shaped” running light elements. The rear bumper was redesigned to give the sedan more “visual width,” Jaguar says, and the LED taillights have a new graphic treatment.Changes for the cabin begin on the center stack, where buyers can now option the InControl Touch Pro Duo infotainment system also offered in the Jaguar I-Pace. That comes with a 5-inch touchscreen and two large rotary dials lower on the center stack for operating the climate control. While it looks quite snazzy, we haven’t always been smitten with those on the road, often finding their responses lethargic.Other new tech for the 2020 XE includes wireless phone charging (a Jaguar first) and an available camera-based rear-view mirror, which at the push of a button can switch between being a normal glass mirror and a screen showing the output from a camera mounted in the car’s sharkfin antenna.2020 Jaguar XEEnlarge ImageWireless phone charging, the shifter and the climate-control setup shown here are new for 2020. Jaguar Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are supported as part of the Smartphone Pack option, and a 4G Wi-Fi hotspot is available. An optional Smart Settings function claims to “learn” a driver’s radio, climate control and other settings over time, recognizing each driver depending on which key fob is used and/or which phone is paired via Bluetooth.Other cabin tweaks focus on ergonomics, with an F-Type-inspired shifter replacing the old XE’s rotary-style one, new door grab handles that free up storage space for bottles in the door pockets, “more comfortable” leather seats and increases amounts of soft-touch materials.The only engine choice for the 2020 XE is a 2.0-liter turbocharged inline-four, although it is offered in two power outputs. In keeping with Jaguar’s new naming structure, the two engine versions will be labeled P250 and P300. The former serves up 247 horsepower while the latter packs 296 horsepower, enough to rocket the car to 60 miles per hour in 5.7 seconds. The P250 can be had with either two or four driven wheels, while the P300 is all-wheel-drive only. 2020 Jaguar XEEnlarge ImageYou can get the 2.0-liter turbo-four engine either with 247 or 296 horsepower. Jaguar Keen-eyed readers will note that the car’s prior supercharged V6 and turbocharged diesel engines are gone. A spokesman said that overall Jaguar had trimmed the XE lineup from 31 variants to just 3 for 2020, and that the high-output turbo-four (296 hp) takes the place of the old supercharged V6 — though it, of course, doesn’t match up to that model’s 380-hp output.For buyers who want more sportiness, there is also a new Dynamic Handling package that bundles a few features that were previously individual add-ons: adaptive dampers, enlarged brakes with painted calipers and a trunk-lid spoiler.The 2020 Jaguar XE will hit US showrooms this summer, with prices starting at $40,895 (with destination) for the S P250 rear-wheel-drive model. The S P250 all-wheel-drive is $42,895 and the tongue-twisting R-Dynamic S P300 costs $47,290. Post a comment Tags More about 2017 Jaguar XE Geneva Motor Show 2019 Jaguar Jaguar Sedans Luxury cars Sedans Apr 17 • The 2020 Jaguar XE gets its first major visual refresh Geneva Motor Show 2019 Mar 7 • New Peugeot 208 debuts i-Cockpit with 3D HUD Combo dashboard Mar 8 • VW is still ‘100 percent’ investigating a pickup truck for the US • See Allcenter_img 0 reading • The 2020 Jaguar XE gets facelifted inside and out for Geneva 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous Review • 2017 Jaguar XE: This kitty’s claws are out for BMW More From Roadshow 56 Photos The 2020 Jaguar XE gets its first major visual refresh Share your voice Mar 7 • The Ferrari F8 Tributo is the last of the nonhybrid V8s 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger valuelast_img read more

Volpara Offers Data on Breast Density Dose and Analytics

first_imgRelated content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Recent Videos View all 606 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Find more SCCT news and videos Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Information Technology View all 220 items Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Volpara now offers products to track breast density in mammography, X-ray radiation dose and analytical data. The company now integrates with tomosynthesis 3-D mammo systems. The technology has installations in 31 countries. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 3:54Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -3:54 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Technology Reports View all 9 items Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Women’s Health View all 62 items center_img CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Sponsored Content | Videos | Breast Density | January 15, 2015 Volpara Offers Data on Breast Density, Dose and Analytics Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more

Dbacks president Derrick Hall Franchise still f

first_img D-backs president Derrick Hall: Franchise ‘still focused on Arizona’ Now, if he takes the next step like Prisco suggests hewill, chances are good the second-year pro will find hisway back to the Pro Bowl (assuming it still exists),albeit for a different reason than before. Comments   Share   Peterson finished the year with 64 tackles, twointerceptions and 13 passes defensed, showing that theability is there to become one of the league’s bettercornerbacks. Cardinals expect improving Murphy to contribute right away What an MLB source said about the D-backs’ trade haul for Greinke Nevada officials reach out to D-backs on potential relocation Top Stories Patrick Peterson may have been a Pro Bowler as a rookie in2011, but that has not stopped a prominent NFL writer topick him as a breakout candidate for 2012. In fact, if CBSSports.com’s Pete Prisco isright, Peterson, who is an impact player in the returngame, will become the cover corner the team needs.Yes, he flashed as a return man, but I think he will takea huge step forward as a cover corner this season. You sawmore of it in the second half last season.last_img read more

December 26 2003 HAPPY HOLIDAYS The annual Arcos

first_imgDecember 26, 2003HAPPY HOLIDAYS: The annual Arcosanti Christmas party was a warm gathering of all residents and employees. Elva Mendoza prepared a wonderful Mexican meal in the cafe. (Right) Monica Ramirez and Jewel Blackfeather in conversation, while feasting on special hors d’oeuvres shared by residents. [Photo & Text: KH] The rebar Christmas tree was covered with cards and gifts for all residents. Paolo was in attendance and generously spread the holiday cheer to all. [Photo & Text: KH]last_img read more