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Miner killed by fallen tree in Region 7

first_imgEmilo Rodney La Rose, a gold miner of the North-West District (N-WD) in Region One (Barima-Waini), was killed at about 15:15h on Wednesday when a tree fell on him in the Kuribroung Backdam in Region Seven (Cuyuni-Mazaruni).The incident reportedly occurred while La Rose and a group of other miners were working on a pit.Police investigations reveal that La Rose was clearing the land above the pit while his colleagues were working in the pit. The men reported hearing La Rose “hollering in pain”, and immediately went to investigate. They found him lying on his stomach with a fallen tree lying across his back.They immediately rushed to his assistance, removing him from under the tree and rushing him to the Bartica Hospital, where he was pronounced dead on arrival.The body of the 46-year-old miner is currently at the New Memorial Gardens Funeral Home, awaiting a post mortem examination, which has been scheduled for Monday.The pit where the incident occurred belongs to dredge owner Stephen Edwards of Bartica.last_img read more

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GDF ranks implicated in Essequibo Coast robbery-rape under close arrest

first_imgTwo members of the Guyana Defence Force (GDF) attached to the Sixth Infantry Battalion at Anna Regina, Essequibo Coast, were placed under close arrest following their implication in a robbery-rape committed on a couple on Saturday evening.Based on reports received, the two ranks were accused of raping a young girl while her boyfriend was forced to watch in the vicinity of the Anna Regina Community Centre Ground. The incident reportedly occurred about 23:40h when the two young people reportedly went to the venue for an event.While there, they were reportedly attacked by the two GDF ranks who beat the young man, took away his money and gold chain, and demanded that his girlfriend have sex with them or else they would rape him.At first, this demand was shut down, but the two ranks severely beat the young man. They then allegedly took turns raping the young girl as she wept bitterly and asked them to stop.The young man had no choice but to watch his girlfriend being sexually assaulted. After the ordeal, the young couple reported the matter to the Police Station. At the Police Station, the couple were told that there were no ranks available to search the area.Family members took it upon themselves to look for the two perpetrators. Upon seeing the angry mob of residents, the two men escaped. The couple were taken to hospital where the young lady was admitted. The Police subsequently took statements from the two traumatised young people and an investigation was launched.An identification parade was done Monday afternoon at the Suddie Police Station, and the two perpetrators were positively identified by the victims. This newspaper was told that while the ID parade was in progress, colleagues of the implicated ranks were heard shouting derogatory remarks at the victims.Guyana Times understands that the young male victim is an acquaintance of both ranks. The GDF in a release on Monday stated that it would give the necessary support to the Guyana Police Force as the investigations continue into the heinous crime.last_img read more

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Broadcasters are W Cup losers owing to piracy trend in Africa

first_img“I’ve got a Canal Plus box, but I got hooked up to BeIN Sports for the World Cup — it costs less!” says Blaise.BeIN has no rights to broadcast World Cup matches in the western central African state.But that is overlooked by a host of private firms, unconnected to the Qatar-based pay TV group, which will happily link up punters to the BeIN feed in exchange for a sum.Blaise shrugs off any legal or moral qualms about broadcasting piracy, a common phenomenon across Africa. “It’s their problem, not mine.”AFP contacted BeIN, but it did not respond.BeIN’s direct competitor, Canal Plus, says piracy costs it between 15 and 20 percent of its turnover, according to Mamadou Mbengue, the head of the channel in Gabon.“Canal Plus has a virtual monopoly on sports broadcasting rights in all of French-speaking sub-Saharan Africa, but some companies are committing industrial piracy. They get a free ride, while we paid for the rights,” he said.“It worries us because it impacts our business. There is a risk of the same thing happening which occurred in the Maghreb — in the long term, we have to pack our bags.”The station pulled out of the Maghreb region years ago, with BeIN now the only authorised World Cup broadcaster in Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco and Egypt.– ‘Do something’ –Bizarrely, Canal Plus is back in Algeria — but illegally so. Viewers are able to quite easily buy set-top boxes, which break through the channel’s encryption.“It’s piracy,” says a hawker at a large market in Algiers. He said the devices are sold everywhere legally for between 100 and 150 euros ($115 and $175).The practice is widespread across the region, particularly in the Moroccan city of Casablanca known as “the Mecca of pirated material”.In four of the five African countries that made it through to the tournament — Senegal, Nigeria, Morocco and Tunisia — public television channels have bought the rights to broadcast the national team’s matches.In Senegal, the National Council of Audiovisual Regulation threatened penalties against any illegal transmission of games, coming after a row between two broadcasters over the rights that ended with both being able to show matches.“The costs of broadcasting rights for sports events are often too high for our organisations, this partly explains the piracy,” said Gregoire Ndjaka, director of the African Broadcasting Union.He has received between 10 and 15 calls a day since the start of the World Cup: “They come from Ghana, Cameroon, Ivory Coast… they all ask me to do something so that local actors respect the arrangements and stop hacking.”Beatrice Damiba, president of the Pan-African NGO Convergence, which fights against piracy, said it works to inform people that it’s theft.“It’s not only football that is hacked, there us also music, cinema, and that concerns all of Africa,” she said.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Tunisia fans cheer during a match against Belgium at the Spartak Stadium in Moscow, but some supporters back home in Africa were watching the game illegally © AFP/File / Kirill KUDRYAVTSEVLIBREVILLE, Gabon, Jun 27 – Blaise has a beer in his hand, he’s in front of a TV screen showing the World Cup, and the smile on his face suggests life doesn’t get much better than this.But Canal Plus may disagree — it owns the broadcasting rights in Gabon to the match being illegally shown in the bar in Libreville, the capital.last_img read more

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International star with five goal in ten games scores again – Wanted by Arsenal, Tottenham and West Ham

first_img1 West Ham United are currently leading the race to sign Basel star Fabian Schar and their scouts will have been watching eagerly as he played in Switzerland’s Euro 2016 qualifier against Estonia.And the player, who is also being trailed by Arsenal and Tottenham, will not have disappointed as he headed home the Swiss’ opener on Friday.The goal, following a neat corner routine, means Schar has now netted an astonishing five international goals in just ten games – try and beat that Harry Kane.You can see Schar’s goal below… West Ham, Tottenham and Arsenal target Fabian Schar last_img read more

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Every Premier League club’s record signing revealed as Salah joins Liverpool

first_img 20 20 20 20 Chelsea bought Fernando Torres from Liverpool for £50m in 2011 20 20 20 20 Crystal Palace signed Christian Benteke for £27m from Liverpool in 2016 20 20 Liverpool have finally broken their transfer record to sign Mohamed Salah from Roma.Their record had existed since the 2011 signing of Andy Carroll from Newcastle, with the England forward flopping at Anfield following his £35m move.But now that unfortunate record no longer exists, as Salah’s move to Merseyside will cost the Reds up to £43.9m including add-ons.So, Salah joins the list of Premier League record signings – but who is the most expensive player signed by every other Premier League club?You can find out every Premier League club’s record signing by clicking the right arrow, above…*All valuations are totals including any reported add-ons Huddersfield Town signed Christopher Schindler from 1860 Munich for £1.8m in 2016 Arsenal signed Mesut Ozil from Real Madrid in 2013 for £42.5m – click the right arrow to see every Premier League club’s record signing Southampton’s record signing is Sofiane Boufal, bought from Lille for £16m in 2016 getty 20 Tottenham Hotspur signed Erik Lamela from Roma in 2013 and Moussa Sissoko from Newcastle in 2016, both for a club record £30m fee Everton’s record signing is Jordan Pickford, brought to Goodison Park from Sunderland for £30m in 2017 20 Brighton and Hove Albion signed Mat Ryan from Valencia in 2017 for a reported £6m fee center_img Manchester City’s record signing is Kevin De Bruyne, signed from Wolfsburg in 2015 for £54m 20 Burnley’s record signing is Robbie Brady, signed for £13m from Norwich in 2017 Leicester City bought Sporting CP’s Islam Slimani for £29m in 2016 20 Newcastle United broke their transfer record to sign Michael Owen from Real Madrid in 2005, for a £17m fee – Michael Owen signed for Newcastle in a £17million deal in 2005 after being chased by former manager Graeme Souness 20 20 20 20 West Bromwich Albion’s record signing is Nacer Chadli, signed from Tottenham for £13m in 2016 Swansea City’s record signing is Borja Baston, signed from Atletico Madrid for £15.5m in 2016 20 Bournemouth’s record signing is Jordon Ibe, bought from Liverpool for £15m in 2016 20 Watford bought Roberto Pereyra from Juventus in 2016 for £13m Manchester United signed Paul Pogba from Juventus in 2016 for a world record £89m fee Stoke City broke their transfer record in 2016 to sign Giannelli Embula from Porto for £18.3m Mohamed Salah has become Liverpool’s record signing, with his fee rising to £43.9m with add-ons West Ham United broke their transfer record in 2016 to sign Andre Ayew from Swansea for £20.5mlast_img read more

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DONEGALDAILY: HERE TO HELP COUNTY DONEGAL CHARITIES

first_imgARE you involved in charity work and need help?Well donegaldaily.com is here to help. If you are having an event and want to publicise it, just send details with pictures to info@donegaldaily.com and we’ll include it on Donegal’s fastest growing website.So whether you’re having your legs shaved, or having a bath in a tin of beans – all to raise money for good causes – then let us know. Charities are an important part of life here in the county and we want to give our support.Pictured are just two of the ordinary people who help to make such a big difference.Alex Rucka and Lynne Brolly work at The Sandwich Company on Main Street in Letterkenny.And on Friday the trendy cafe was giving away free tea and coffee for customers – in return for a donation to Breast Cancer charities. The girls helped to raise €275 for the charity. They added to that by collecting more money over the weekend.Well done all!DONEGALDAILY: HERE TO HELP COUNTY DONEGAL CHARITIES was last modified: May 9th, 2011 by gregShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Men’s Soccer Falls to Valparaiso, 3-1

first_imgNext Game: WEST DES MOINES, Iowa – The Drake University men’s soccer team fell to Valparaiso, 3-1, on Wednesday night at Tiger Field. Watch Live Live Stats Adan Garcia and Mason Marcey were credited with assists on the play, and the two added to their statline minutes later when Garcia found Marcey for the go-ahead goal in the 45th minute. From there the junior forward did what he does best and powered a strike through the keeper’s hands and into the back of the net. Enzugusi’s six goals this season rank third in the Missouri Valley Conference. at Loyola 10/27/2019 – 1 PM Lucas Bartlett launched a long pass from his defender position to Nate Seaberg at midfield, who touched it off to Istvan Wilhelms. Wilhelms then delivered a beautiful long ball to Enzugusi. The Bulldogs spent much of the game’s early minutes controlling possession with their backline, and this strategy paid off with Enzugusi’s goal.center_img The Crusaders were able to seize momentum in the 37th minute with an equalizer from Andy Lomelli on a curling left-footed shot that snuck into the lower-right corner of the goal. Leroy Enzugusi opened the scoring in the 22nd minute with his team-best sixth goal of the season, but the Crusaders responded with three consecutive goals to leave town with the victory. Valparaiso notched an insurance goal in the 62nd minute when Garcia sent a low cross the width of the box to Demar Rose, who sent in a left-footed strike to make it 3-1. It was Garcia’s third assist of the night. Full Schedule Roster Preview Drake controlled 56 percent of the possession and gained a 14-4 advantage in shot attempts, but both sides put four shots on target. Drake (7-7, 4-4 MVC) travels to Loyola on Sunday for its next match. Kickoff is slated for 1 p.m. Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

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Rodgers admits tactical mistake

first_imgLiverpool boss Brendan Rodgers said a change to his side’s formation enabled them to secure a point against Chelsea.The Reds were second best for large parts of the game but drew 1-1 after Luis Suarez netted a second-half equaliser.Rodgers explained: “In the first half we were a wee bit tentative, which was my fault because we normally play with three up front which allow us to press higher up the field.“We went 3-5-2 and just couldn’t quite press – and that’s a big part of our game. Once we change it we then got more onto the front foot again.”He added: “It was great character from the players yet again. It was a terrific point.”See also:Terry injured as Blues draw with LiverpoolDi Matteo hoping for good news on 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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Matt Millen searching for his ‘holy grail’ after life-changing heart transplant

first_imgMatt Millen is speaking from the heart. His new heart.Millen, 60, the former NFL linebacker who won Super Bowls with the Raiders, 49ers and Washington, is recovering after a Christmas Eve heart transplant, according to NBC’s Peter King.Apparently the new organ arrived just in the nick of time, as Millen’s original heart had been ravaged by the disease amyloidosis.“When my doctor took out my heart, he saw how much it was damaged,” Millen told King. “It was awful. He said I must have …last_img read more

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Freedom Day: long time coming

first_imgDorothy Molefe, Hector Pieterson’s mother, and photographer Sam Nzima. The Hector Pieterson Memorial in Soweto, with the iconic image.(Images: Lucille Davie)MEDIA CONTACTS • Mack LeweleDirector, communications, Departmentof Arts   and Culture+27 (0)12 441 3083RELATED ARTICLES• Freedom rediscovered• Freedom Park: celebrating peace• Hold on to freedom, says Brand South AfricaLucille DavieFreedom Day on 27 April marks the day South Africa voted in its first democratic elections. That day took 342 years to reach.Racial discrimination existed in various forms almost from the start of European settlement in the country, when the Dutch East India Company governor, Jan van Riebeeck, arrived at the Cape in 1652. But it was formally legislated when the National Party came to power in 1948. Dehumanising laws separating people along race lines, decreeing where they could live, get jobs, educate their children, spend their leisure time, make friendships, were introduced.It took 46 years to abandon apartheid, and on 27 April 1994 the first democratic elections were held in the country, with Nelson Mandela becoming the country’s first democratic president. But that was a battle hard fought, with many lives lost, many going into exile, many tortured for their beliefs, many families separated, many lives destroyed. The path to the end of apartheid is a story of courage, determination and sacrifice. Names like Chief Albert Luthuli, Mandela, Oliver Tambo, Walter Sisulu, Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, Helen Joseph, Ruth First, Dr Yusuf Dadoo, Lilian Ngoyi and many others, stand as giants of the struggle.The Freedom CharterSouth Africa’s constitution used the Freedom Charter as its building block. The charter brought together the heartfelt desires and longings of the millions of oppressed South Africans, from all walks of life. On 26 June 1955, people from around the country gathered on a dusty soccer field in Kliptown, the first suburb of Soweto, to approve the Freedom Charter over a two-day period, in an atmosphere described by Mandela in his Long Walk to Freedom autobiography as “serious and festive”.Mandela set the scene on the day: “More than three thousand delegates braved police intimidation to assemble and approve the final document. They came by car, bus, truck and foot. Although the overwhelming number of delegates were black, there were more than three hundred Indians, two hundred coloureds and one hundred whites.”On the afternoon of the second day, the police stopped the meeting, saying they suspected treason was being committed. Mandela had to creep away (he and Sisulu were hiding on the roof of a hardware store overlooking the field, because they were banned at the time). He says in his autobiography: “Like other enduring political documents, such as the American Declaration of Independence, the French Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Communist Manifesto, the Freedom Charter is a mixture of practical goals and poetic language.”The charter was signed by Luthuli a year later.The Treason TrialMandela admits that the apartheid government had just cause to consider the document treasonable: “The charter was in fact a revolutionary document precisely because the changes it envisioned could not be achieved without radically altering the economic and political structure of South Africa. It was not meant to be capitalist or socialist but a melding together of the people’s demands to end the oppression. In South Africa, merely to achieve fairness, one had to destroy apartheid itself, for it was the very embodiment of injustice.”And the government acted accordingly. Exactly 18 months later it struck: in December 1956 they arrested Mandela, the entire executive leadership of the ANC and others – 156 people in all. They were charged with high treason and “a countrywide conspiracy to use violence to overthrow the present government and replace it with a communist state”, says Mandela. If found guilty, the sentence was death.So began the notorious Treason Trial, which lasted almost five years, after which the accused were acquitted – the judges said the prosecution had failed to prove that the ANC was a communist organisation or that the Freedom Charter propagated a communist state.Of his acquittal in 1961, Mandela said: “After more than four years in court and dozens of prosecutors, thousands of documents and tens of thousands of pages of testimony, the state had failed in its mission. The verdict was an embarrassment to the government, both at home and abroad. Yet the result only made the state more bitter towards us. The lesson they took away was not that we had legitimate grievances but that they needed to be far more ruthless.”Kliptown MuseumThe story of the thousands of people who contributed to the drafting of the Freedom Charter is now told in the Kliptown Open Air Museum. The museum, on the western wing of the Walter Sisulu Square of Dedication in Kliptown, which incorporates the humble soccer field, was opened in 2007.The museum is open seven days a week, and guided tours are offered.Liliesleaf in RivoniaIn 1961 the ANC, established in 1912, decided to form an armed wing, Umkhonto we Sizwe (meaning spear of the nation) or MK, led by Mandela. Decades of peaceful resistance had led nowhere, with black people becoming increasingly frustrated. MK’s operations were conducted underground, with its headquarters on a smallholding on a small farm called Liliesleaf, in the suburb of Rivonia, in northern Johannesburg.The key leaders had operated from its outhouses for two years. Mandela lived on the property, masquerading as the gardener and cook, under the alias of David Motsamayi. In those days, Rivonia consisted of a rural patchwork of smallholdings, riding schools and farms, with few tarred roads. Today, it has been engulfed by the northern expansion of Johannesburg, to become one of the city’s most upmarket suburbs.In July 1963, a dry cleaning van drove up to the door. Armed policemen burst out … and from that moment, the word “Rivonia” became synonymous around the world with the silencing of black resistance in South Africa. Mandela describes the swoop on Liliesleaf in his autobiography: “On the afternoon of 11 July, a dry cleaner’s van entered the long driveway of the farm. No one at Liliesleaf had ordered a delivery. The vehicle was stopped by a young African guard, but he was overwhelmed when dozens of armed policemen and several police dogs sprang from the vehicle. In the [the thatched cottage] they found a dozen men around a table discussing a document.”That document turned out to be the plan and outline of Operation Mayibuye, the MK strategy for guerrilla warfare in South Africa. The men in the room were Raymond Mhlaba, Govan Mbeki, Lionel “Rusty” Bernstein, Walter Sisulu, Bob Hepple, Ahmed Kathrada and Denis Goldberg. Mandela himself was absent – he was serving a five-year sentence on Robben Island for inciting workers to strike in mid-1961, and for leaving the country without a passport.He wrote: “In one fell swoop, the police had captured the entire High Command of Umkhonto we Sizwe.”Mandela was brought up to Pretoria from the island, having served nine months of his five-year sentence, and together with the other top MK members, was charged with sabotage, a crime carrying the death sentence, in what was referred to as the Rivonia Trial. Says Mandela: “From that moment on we lived in the shadow of the gallows.”But they didn’t get the death sentence – instead, they were given life imprisonment. In 1964, the prison doors slammed on their backs – most of the men served between 22 and 27 years in prison, Mandela being the last one to be released in February 1990.At the trial Mandela made a speech from the dock instead of testifying. The speech is perhaps one of the country’s most significant documents, and it ends with probably Mandela’s most poignant words. “During my lifetime I have dedicated myself to this struggle of the African people. I have fought against white domination, and I have fought against black domination. I have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. It is an ideal which I hope to live for and to achieve. But if needs be, it is an ideal for which I am prepared to die.”The buildings of Liliesleaf have been sensitively restored, and are now open as a museum and conference centre. Daily tours can be taken, and the site is open seven days a week.Resistance gathersThe apartheid government thought it had silenced the ANC, but it wasn’t long before the resistance gathered again. It came to a head with the actions of schoolchildren in Soweto, the country’s biggest township, just outside Johannesburg. There had been rumblings of discontent in early 1976 when the government imposed Afrikaans on pupils, forcing teachers to teach certain subjects in the language of the government, a language with which they were not comfortable.That discontent culminated in a march by some 15 000 children to the Orlando Stadium in Soweto, on 16 June 1976. But they didn’t get to the stadium because they met the police along the way. With varying accounts of how the bloodshed started, the police were soon firing into the crowd, killing and wounding the children. It is estimated that 566 people died in Soweto on that day.One child, 12-year-old Hector Pieterson, came to symbolise the day and the brutality of apartheid. He was shot by police, and was gathered up in the arms of another pupil, Mbuyisa Makhubo, who, together with Hector’s sister, Antoinette, ran towards a press car, where he was bundled in, and taken to a nearby clinic, where he was pronounced dead.Another child, 13-year-old Hastings Ndlovu, was fatally shot before Hector was gunned down, but the difference was that photographer Sam Nzima was on hand to record the event, in what is now an iconic image of apartheid police killing children. The photograph hit the front pages of the world’s newspapers the next day.“I saw a child fall down. Under a shower of bullets I rushed forward and went for the picture. It had been a peaceful march, the children were told to disperse, they started singing Nkosi Sikelele [the freedom anthem]. The police were ordered to shoot,” said Nzima of the day. “I was the only photographer there at the time. Other photographers came when they heard shots,” he says. Nzima was a photographer for The World newspaper in Johannesburg.The Hector Pieterson Museum and Memorial, opened in 2002, commemorates Hector and the other children who died on that day and the days that followed. The confrontation spread around the township, and around the country, and 16 June, now commemorated as Youth Day, will forever be remembered as the day of the beginning of the end of apartheid.It was followed by the turbulent 1980s, when apartheid’s cracks widened, aided by international boycotts and sanctions and the unsustainability of apartheid. By the end of the 1980s, apartheid was on its knees, a wounded and desperate animal. In February 1990, Mandela was released from prison and four years later the first democratic elections were held.The Apartheid Museum, in Nasrec in southern Johannesburg, graphically and movingly captures the terrible history of apartheid, in powerful displays, large blown-up photographs, artefacts, newspaper clippings, and some moving film footage. This extraordinarily powerful museum is an obligatory stop for tourists and residents alike.last_img read more

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