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Month: July 2019

IFF expands flavours facility in Cairo as it targets Africa growth

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first_imgIFF expands flavours facility in Cairo as it targets Africa growthPosted By: News Deskon: September 19, 2017In: Beverage, Flavours, Food, IndustriesPrintEmailInternational Flavors & Fragrances (IFF) has opened its fully renovated and expanded facility in Cairo, Egypt.The site has been operational since 1979, consisting of a sales office, creation and applications labs, and flavour production facilities. The expansion increases the company’s ability to provide application support across key categories for the region.The investment supports the company’s regional focus on growth in the Middle East and Africa, as well as its focus on key categories, as it aims to provide enhanced services to customers.IFF CEO Andreas Fibig said: “The Middle East/Africa region is a critical component of our Vision 2020 strategy. We believe the expansion and upgrade of our Cairo facility will support our efforts to grow in this exciting and dynamic region.“The expanded labs will allow us to better serve our Egyptian customers and strengthen our market presence in Africa and the Middle East.”IFF employs around 7,400 people around the world and sells its products in 160 countries.Share with your network: Tags: 3 SinnersEgyptflavourslast_img read more

Pinkster introduces 3 litre baginbox raspberryinfused gin

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first_imgPinkster introduces 3 litre bag-in-box raspberry-infused ginPosted By: News Deskon: February 20, 2018In: Alcohol, Beverage, Industries, Innovation, New products, PackagingPrintEmailBritish spirits brand Pinkster has launched a 3 litre bag-in-box variant of its raspberry-infused gin in a move to become more sustainable.Designed to cut down on glass waste, the packaging is aimed at both on-trade and off-trade channels.Pinkster managing director Stephen Marsh said: “Bag-in-boxes have been enjoying a renaissance in the wine world, with many retailers reporting a surge in sales, and we see no reason why this shouldn’t be the case with spirits.“Pinkster on Tap is all about convenience and sustainability delivered in an eye-catching, stylish format. Rather than ordering bottle after bottle, the on-trade can now refuel in an environmentally friendly fashion and save a few pounds in the process.“We’ve tested the concept with selected accounts and initial feedback has been mighty positive. It’s time for bag-in-boxes to shed their rather negative and passé perceptions, and we’re proud as a premium brand, to be leading the way on this.”According to Recycle Now, the UK currently recycles around 50% of its glass bottles and while this figure has doubled over the last five years, it still lags behind the European average. Marsh added:  “From Glastonbury to Glyndebourne, we’re excited about the potential of summer festivals, offering people a fun, practical way of enjoying their G&Ts, especially given pink gin seems to be the drink of the moment.“Similarly for the sailing fraternity, summer picnics, and other outdoor activities, where glass is either frowned upon, banned or you simply don’t want to lug around clunky, heavy bottles.“With consumer drinking and purchasing habits changing, we’re always looking at new ways to stand out from the pack.“We’re mindful that this is trailblazing for spirits packaging but on the basis pundits said we were mad to contemplate making gin with wet fruit all those years ago, we’re not exactly sticklers for convention.”The 3 litre Pinkster on Tap is available in the UK with a recommended retail price of £135.Share with your network: Tags: ginPinksterUKlast_img read more

Finalists in the International Beverage Awards announced

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first_imgFinalists in the International Beverage Awards announcedPosted By: News Deskon: June 11, 2018In: Awards, Business, Dairy, Industries, InnovationPrintEmailAll finalists in the International Beverage Awards 2018 have been announced, ahead of a ceremony later this month.The winners will be announced as part of Drink Japan, in Tokyo, on 27 June.A full list of finalists can be seen below.FoodBev Media group editor Alex Clere said: “The International Beverage Awards will bring together FoodBev’s expertise in hosting leading industry awards schemes with the reputation and gravitas of Drink Japan, one of Asia’s leading beverage events. We are therefore very excited to present the winners with their trophies later this month.“As this is the very first International Beverage Awards, we are both impressed and humbled by the calibre of entries. Between them, the finalists have demonstrated innovative new packaging technologies, exciting beverage ideas, and a greener way forward for the beverage industry.“Being named a finalist puts you in front of a respected audience at Drink Japan, and winning an ‘International Beverage Award’ is an accolade that cannot be underestimated.”Best new adult drinkCELIA – Premium Czech LagerCider Supply Co.- Galipette CidreModern Contradiction – Something & Nothing Cucumber SeltzerBest new alcoholic drinkAïkan Whisky – Aïkan WhiskyHoxton Gin – Hoxton Pink GinThe Old Curiosity Distillery – Apothecary Rose GinBest new beverage conceptBlendi – Blendi SmoothiesFizzique – Sparkling Protein WaterWNS Group – WDOM Lactose Free Real Dark Chocolate MilkBest new brandAïkan Whisky – Aïkan WhiskyKwela Tebza Products – Di Mamzo Ice TeaSmart Cups – Smart Cups Energy DrinksWNS Group – WDOMBest new businessMySip – MySipRevacs – 100% Recycling Process of Waste Beverage ProductsSmart Cups – Smart Cups Energy DrinksBest new cosmetic drinkBeauty & Go – Skin ShotDIRTY LEMON – +roseDream Products – Dream WaterBest new craft drinkCELIA – Premium Czech LagerCider Supply Co. – Galipette CidreKaratsu Style Co. – Shanti SwitchelBest new dairy drinkChuckling Goat – KefirMeiji – Bulgaria Yogurt DrinkThe Collective – Kefir cultured drinkBest new free-from drinkBlendi – Blendi SmoothiesModern Contradiction – Something & NothingWNS Group – WDOM Lactose Free Real Dark Chocolate MilkBest new functional drinkAlive Beverages – SupahumanBosmen – Sultan Power DrinkFizzique – Sparkling Protein WaterGolden Bay Springs – Bite Me TonicBest new liquid foodBlendi – Blendi SmoothiesSaturo Foods – SaturoThe Collective – Kefir cultured drinkBest new manufacturing innovationEcolean – Ecolean Air and Ecolean Air AsepticKarl Knauer – HiLight- Smart LEDsSmart Cups – Smart Cups Energy DrinkBest new packaging designCarter Wong Design – TicketybrewCowan London – Akashi-TaiDelivering Happiness – Garçon WinesEcolean – Ecolean Air and Ecolean Air AsepticBest new water drinkDIRTY LEMON – VogueModern Contradiction – Something & Nothing Cucumber SeltzerVOSS – Lime Mint Sparkling WaterBest new technology innovationEcolean – Ecolean Air and Ecolean Air AsepticKarl Knauer – HiLight- Smart LEDsSmart Cups – Smart Cups Energy DrinksBest sustainability innovationArdagh Group – Hybrid Battery StorageNago Pineapple Winery – International Coral Reef InitiativeSmart Cups – Smart Cups Energy DrinksShare with your network: Tags: beverageDrink JapanInternational Beverage AwardsJapanlast_img read more

Falcon Heavy worlds most powerful rocket launches – as it happened

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first_img Twitter | Pick Share on Facebook 24 25 Share Facebook Tue 6 Feb 2018 17.33 EST Twitter 2 3 Share on Twitter Jomper Play Video Report Key events Smallworld5 Reply Twitter | Pick Reply Report Share Share on Twitter Show 7 Feb 201817:33 SummaryWe’re going to close our live coverage of the historic Falcon Heavy launch with a summary of the afternoon’s events.Through a waterfall of cascading fire and smoke, SpaceX successfully launched its first Falcon Heavy, the most powerful rocket in operation anywhere in the world, and second only in strength to the Apollo-era leviathans that took crews to the moon.The company then successfully separated its three rocket boosters, and landed two in a ballet of controlled burns. They landed onto parallel launchpads near where they took off in Cape Canaveral, Florida.The third booster was unaccounted for by the company. It was meant to land on a droneship in the Atlantic ocean, but the company did not explain its fate after a camera feed cut out from the vibrations of the rocket. Billionaire founder Elon Musk successfully launched one of his Tesla Roadsters on a course toward Mars. He revealed surreal live video feeds of the car cruising around the planet, complete with a “Don’t Panic” dashboard message, a dummy astronaut in the driver’s seat, and David Bowie on the radio. 7 Feb 2018 5:13 Reuse this content,View all comments > Share on Twitter The success is a major step toward cheaper, more frequent spaceflight, making it easier for governments and businesses to lift massive projects into space or set off on deep space missions. SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy is estimated to cost $90m per launch; Nasa’s planned SLS rocket, a comparable system, is expected to cost about $1bn per flight. Report gooner4thewin 3 4 Twitter All Share on Facebook Twitter Twitter Report It hasn’t launched yet. Easy grader. Twitter Report 7 Feb 2018 4:08 8 9 Liftoff. Photograph: Joe Skipper/Reuters Share on Facebook Smallworld5 Share on Twitter Bill Nelson (@SenBillNelson)Congratulations, @SpaceX! Amazing! pic.twitter.com/MvR3xNyh3rFebruary 6, 2018 7 Feb 201816:00 | Pick 25 7 Feb 201815:43T-minus two 7 Feb 2018 5:32 3 4 Share on Twitter Report Twitter Flight. Photograph: Joe Skipper/Reuters Share on Twitter Twitter Catherine Q. (@CatherineQ)Going to be reliving this sight for days. #FalconHeavy pic.twitter.com/3Bo2dGoqxBFebruary 6, 2018 Reply Isn’t that rocket a bit of a gas-guzzler? SamSmeagol Elon Musk has tweeted out an update on the upper stage – his Tesla Roadster is cruising through high-energy radiation belts circling the Earth, toward deep space.The projected path of the car would bring it close to Mars, but Musk has said there is only an “extremely tiny” chance that it might crash into the planet. If it stays on course, it would instead drift through space, potentially for millions of years. arfinillit metalborg Share Twitter Share Share on Facebook Report Share on Facebook 7 Feb 2018 4:42 7 Feb 201816:19 Quality! Facebook Report Share on Twitter Share Share 7 Feb 2018 6:02 7 Feb 201816:08 Share on Twitter | Pick they dream of escape to another world … that they can then proceed to fuck up like this one noble enterprise, eh, what 7 Feb 2018 5:35 Share Share on Facebook Meanwhile, sitting in a tin can far above the earth, nothing he can do, a dummy driver in a Tesla Roadster.An earlier photograph from inside the rocket revealed that the words “DON’T PANIC” on the dashboard computer. Reply Share Facebook Share on Facebook Report Read more Share on Twitter Screen Shot 2018-02-06 at 4.58.03 PM Photograph: Screengrab blipvert 5 6 Facebook Report SteelyMan51 Twitter Share on Twitter Reply ThereisnoOwl | Pick 10 11 7 Feb 2018 4:19 Report Topics 7 Feb 2018 17:12 Florida Facebook CaressOfSteel UnsightlyOdour 13 14 5 6 Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Facebook Reply Report Reply 7 Feb 2018 3:49 Share oldest | Pick galenvanbrok Share on Twitter 100 Report collapsed Share on Facebook Not much happening Share on Pinterest Report 7 Feb 2018 4:20 Share Report 2 3 Share This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. Due to the large number of comments, they are being shown 100 per page. Med Iashowcases Share on Twitter Gelion 24 25 7 Feb 201815:55 Twitter 7 8 | Pick Share on Twitter Twitter Twitter Share PeppermintSeal Share on Facebook Facebook 11 12 Nogbad the Bad Still ongoing, very slowly… Shortordercook 7 Feb 2018 4:43 Reply Share on Facebook WaveSoarer Share on Facebook Report 11 12 Report Facebook Share on Twitter Because doing difficult things has historically led to science and technology that has paid back the costs many times over. 7 Feb 201816:36 Official SpaceX stream now live on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbSwFU6tY1c 7 Feb 201815:58 Share | Pick Twitter | Pick Report Reply Share Share Twitter Report | Pick Facebook | Pick Facebook SamSmeagol Facebook Wo’, El’on? | Pick Show 17 more replies Share 7 Feb 201817:00 Twitter The first space mission with a purely frivolous payload – a great milestone in the history of humanity! | Pick Share on Twitter Reply Facebook | Pick Take a bow! Share on Facebook Facebook Report next Share expanded Reply Twitter Share Facebook Smallworld5 Share on Facebook 1:39 Reply Reply Facebook 50 7 Feb 2018 3:59 7 Feb 2018 4:05 Do they not usually use these to give a free ride, no guarantees, to research satellites? Elon Musk (@elonmusk)Upper stage restart nominal, apogee raised to 7000 km. Will spend 5 hours getting zapped in Van Allen belts & then attempt final burn for Mars.February 6, 2018 Reply Reply While you’re waiting, WATCH THIS if you want to see Starman driving to Mars. 7 Feb 2018 7:23 76 77 Reply Report They have remote detonators on it. If it starts tracking wrong they will blow it. | Pick Twitter 0 1 Report 1 2 Share on Facebook 7 Feb 2018 4:30 Twitter 4 5 mijnheer Facebook Updatedat 4.52pm EST Share on Facebook Facebook Share on Facebook Share 0 1 Share on Messenger | Pick Share on Facebook Twitter Share on Twitter Twitter Twitter Share on Facebook How could it be? It doesn’t travel high enough. Go Mincey! Do a proper Brexit. Report Twitter SamSmeagol 13 14 Share on Facebook | Pick Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Twitter Reply Report 1 2 | Pick Reply Facebook Share on Facebook Twitter Facebook Facebook Facebook 7 Feb 2018 4:37 Share on Twitter | Pick Report Ian Thirlwell Share on Twitter Twitter Share on Twitter | Pick Share Share 2 3 Med Iashowcases Report Facebook Share on Facebook | Pick Updatedat 5.32am EST Facebook Reply Reply 1 Facebook 7 Feb 2018 4:13 Share on Facebook Report Share on Twitter Report 0 1 Haynes12 mekonista You guys know the payload is just a diversion…His actually sending samples to the elder council of Musks on his home world. Michael_GPF Share on Facebook You want him on the flight? Reply Facebook Facebook Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Facebook Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Facebook 7 Feb 2018 4:11 Germanthomas | Pick Reply NASA (@NASA)Congratulations @SpaceX! Acting Administrator Lightfoot: “All of us in this business know the effort it takes to get to a first flight…and recognize the tremendous accomplishment we witnessed today” https://t.co/SvJG2157zA https://t.co/JJK1RKFtPCFebruary 6, 2018 … Share 7 Feb 2018 4:15 Twitter newest Share PeppermintSeal | Pick Elon Musk (@elonmusk)View from SpaceX Launch Control. Apparently, there is a car in orbit around Earth. pic.twitter.com/QljN2VnL1OFebruary 6, 2018 7 Feb 2018 4:20 Share on Twitter 2 3 Share on Facebook Facebook Share on Facebook Twitter Facebook Share Email (optional) 7 Feb 2018 4:03 75 76 7 Feb 201815:48Boosters separate Twitter Share on Twitter | Pick Share on Twitter 3 4 Twitter | Pick Report UnsightlyOdour 7 Feb 2018 4:03 No.Excited. treborlite Share on Twitter 6 7 Show 8 more replies Share on Facebook Twitter Share Share on Facebook Share Report Share 7 Feb 2018 4:04 Report Share on Twitter 0 1 | Pick 19 20 Facebook A giant leap for Musk-kind Germanthomas 31 32 PotholeKid Considering it won’t use any fuel at all once it escapes the Earth’s gravity, it will probably make very good milage. Reply Report Reply Facebook Timelapse of Elon Musk’s dummy astronaut orbiting Earth in a Tesla – video Show 3 more replies Read more Reply Carson Thomas-Boon chasbot2 Gelion 0 1 Shares5,9265926 | Pick Jomper Show 25 Twitter Facebook Twitter Report Facebook Share on Twitter 12 13 Falcon Heavy, world’s most powerful rocket, launches – as it happened,A heavy-duty rocket from Elon Musk’s private company launches for the first time and aims to make spaceflight cheaper and easierReport: SpaceX’s giant rocket launches successfullySpace oddity: how Elon Musk and SpaceX sent a car towards MarsSign up: Get Lab Notes, our weekly science update next Report 2 Twitter emiliofloris Share on Facebook | Pick Facebook Facebook 7 Feb 2018 3:41 Twitter Share Reply clunky Facebook 7 Feb 2018 4:58 koolherc 45 46 Report | Pick 11 12 Share on WhatsApp Facebook Twitter 1 2 | Pick Share on Facebook Share on Twitter For someone who hates SpaceX, human discovery and endeavor, you seem to be posting an awful lot on the Falcon Heavy articles. Petty. 7 Feb 2018 4:13 Twitter | Pick Germanthomas 7 Feb 2018 7:24 | Pick Should it be The people’s unity space programe? Would that you feel more cheery about it. Share on Twitter Reply Share | Pick Reply Reply Live feed Order by oldest Twitter Reply Share on Facebook Reply Report 4 5 Twitter | Pick Updated 15 Feb 2018,Play Video 1 2 | Pick Falcon Heavy: Elon Musk’s giant SpaceX rocket makes triumphant launch Doug_Niedermeyer Share on Twitter You can watch the car on its journey on the live stream below. Report Share on Twitter Achtungbebe emiliofloris Digitalamnesia Reply _plank_ Reply Sign up for Lab Notes – the Guardian’s weekly science update 5 6 | Pick I genuinely don’t get why? There’s nothing on Mars and establishing a colony of more than a dozen people there will cost $trillions with the colony needed constant things from Earth, 8 months away. There is Helium3 on the Moon, and the Chinese are looking at establishing a moon base, which the Americans will try to do also. Other than that, the rest of the Solar system can be explored by robots – and we certainly do not have the technology to get out of the Solar system unless you want that trip to take 100,000s of years and have the space ship destroyed by micro meteorites during the journey. 7 Feb 2018 3:55 31 32 | Pick Share on Twitter Share on Twitter | Pick Falcon Heavy, world’s most powerful rocket, successfully launches – video Facebook I find it amazing that this isn’t nearer the top of the news on Guardian home page. galenvanbrok Jason Major (@JPMajor)Twin boosters have successfully landed! #FalconHeavy pic.twitter.com/WZnWeoi5GAFebruary 6, 2018 Reply Miriam Kramer (@mirikramer)I’m shook. Literally. It shook the ground. #FalconHeavy #SPACEX pic.twitter.com/Q77lcSUNNEFebruary 6, 2018 Report Share on Facebook Share He miscalculated the contract costs and has ordered Chris Grayling to buy the project back off him. Twitter 7 Feb 201815:45Liftoff Report Reply Hugely impressed that Elon can fit this in to his busy schedule, what with performing and planning his farewell tour, all at the same time. What engaging modesty too, playing Space Oddity rather than his own Rocket Man. Share on Facebook Shortordercook | Pick recommendations Twitter Share on Twitter In a surreal, beautiful image straight out of science fiction, the twin Falcon 9 boosters landing at Cape Canaveral in Florida, after a flawless test launch of the most powerful rocket in operation. Facebook 3 Report Report Show 7 more replies TaliShar Twitter Can’t afford a space program, huh Share on Facebook Nogbad the Bad Reply mijnheer 4 5 Reason (optional) Twitter Excellent Reply Share on Twitter TaliShar Share Report To be honest that’s about the most plausible explanation I’ve heard so far. 7 Feb 201816:33 Share on Facebook Show 14 15 Achtungbebe Share Share 1 Twitter 7 Feb 2018 4:35 Share Facebook Share on Facebook 7 Feb 2018 4:25 Share on Facebook Facebook Share on Twitter Share | Pick Report Share Loading comments… Trouble loading? Twitter Unlike many news organisations, we chose an approach that means all our reporting is free and available for everyone. We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. For as little as $1 you can support us – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Make a contribution – The Guardian Stevon “ShadowBandit39” Kline Reply Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Jon Howe Share on Twitter Reply galenvanbrok Facebook Share on Facebook 7 Feb 2018 4:11 Facebook I’m a bit young to remember the heyday of space travel, with Apollo and all that, in fact my first space memory is Challenger. So this is very exciting. I hope my kids can experience going into space one day. I suspect I have a bad combination of age and not being extremely rich to be able to do it myself, although I’m not that old. There is a car with a dummy in it circling the Earth. This is real. | Pick Nogbad the Bad 1 2 Twitter | Pick Heavy Rocket ? | Pick Achtungbebe mikedow Share on Twitter Facebook Facebook Twitter Share | Pick 2 3 Reply Share on Twitter Reply Facebook Share Show 8 more replies Twitter Facebook Space exploration has resulted in significant advances in understanding our planet and reacting to environmental disasters. How much have you done to advance battery and car tech? Only one kid I see. Share Show 19 more replies 7 Feb 2018 4:18 Share on Twitter Twitter Nasa is working on its own heavy rocket, called the Space Launch System, which remains untested and is projected to cost around $1bn per flight. The Falcon Heavy would cost less than a tenth of that, at $90m per flight. Possibly the most relevant two sentences in the commentary. Report Nogbad the Bad Sign in or create your Guardian account to recommend a comment Report Facebook Are you saying Richard Branson is inside? Share on Facebook Facebook 7 Feb 2018 4:11 Facebook Older It will have a very high mpg, because Mars is 150million miles away! The raptor engines have a 3:8 ratio of Lox to methane. | Pick 7 Feb 2018 4:23 Report 7 Feb 2018 4:17 SteelyMan51 Share on Twitter Reply Share Share on Facebook Share I wonder what the MPG of the car will work out by the time it reaches Mars. The rocket isn’t electric is it? Space Share Facebook Share on Facebook | Pick Share on Facebook Share on Facebook We want to get away from you grumpy leavers yes – a few seconds ahead of the stream above Twitter | Pick Alan Yuhas Share on Twitter Germanthomas Fucking A Plus, Mr Elon Yah its not that point that we won’t to go to Mar specifically. Mars is just a test planet. Also Mars is capable of being cultivated, the minerals in the dirt can sustain plants. Facebook 7 Feb 2018 4:13 Reply Twitter 0 1 Share Share on Twitter Facebook Report Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Report Twitter 7 Feb 2018 4:15 Facebook No. Just a lie 1 2 Facebook 7 Feb 2018 5:47 Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Facebook 7 Feb 2018 4:08 Report Report Twitter Report 1 of 3 Share 7 Feb 201815:53Two rockets land on Earth Twitter Reply Share T-25 Share Reply Share on Twitter Share Twitter Smallworld5 Share via Email Twitter Haynes12 Share on Facebook 0 1 First published on Tue 6 Feb 2018 14.40 EST 7 Feb 2018 3:50 7 Feb 201817:12 2 3 7 Feb 2018 5:07 Facebook MeandYou 4 5 Facebook Reply PeppermintSeal Twitter TaliShar Share on Twitter 7 Feb 2018 4:06 SpaceX Share on Facebook Facebook Share on Facebook 7 Feb 2018 4:25 Reply Only if one is in a boat under the flight path, which is restricted waters for the launch… Twitter This is the beginning of the Weyland Yutani Corporation. Show 2 more replies Share Reply Reply Share on Facebook Share on Twitter 0:32 Carson Thomas-Boon TheSnial Twitter Doug_Niedermeyer Doug_Niedermeyer | Pick Whatever happened to beardie’s project to launch vast plumes of greenhouse gases into the upper atmosphere? | Pick 7 Feb 201817:12Roadster clear, core booster unaccounted for Haynes12 7 Feb 2018 4:16 7 Feb 2018 4:12 7 Feb 2018 6:12 “I’m a bit young to remember the heyday of space travel, with Apollo and all that, in fact my first space memory is Challenger.” That’s the shuttle that exploded. But I am sure you are still a fervent champion of all things lunatic… _plank_ Rudeboy1 Oldest Twitter FrederickJFringerJr Share on Twitter SpaceX Twitter Reply Facebook _plank_ Reply Share I just want to tell you both good luck. We’re all counting on you. Close report comment form 7 Feb 2018 3:45 Report Share on LinkedIn Twitter Jon Howe Twitter Gelion Facebook Go Elon! Share on Twitter Twitter 31 32 7 Feb 2018 4:02 Share on Facebook Achtungbebe This is the first step on a slippery slope to the bourgeoisie’s assault on the remainder of the Universe. No longer content with oppressing the workers of Earth, the capitalist machine sees fit to imprison the entire universe with their shackles of economic despotism. Reply Updatedat 4.38pm EST Twitter Facebook treborlite Facebook launch window has closed everybody can go homedrive carefully 7 Feb 2018 4:25 Report ThereisnoOwl Twitter 0 1 Reply | Pick Share Facebook | Pick Reply comments (1153)Sign in or create your Guardian account to join the discussion. Facebook 7 Feb 2018 4:54 7 Feb 201815:53 | Pick Facebook Reporting from Cape Canaveral, Richard Luscombe has spoken with fellow spectators – most in some stage of frazzled awe at the launch they just witnessed.Sean Clark and his six-year-old daughter Maia watched the Falcon Heavy power into Florida’s clear blue skies, listened to the double sonic boom as the rocket’s boosters returned to Earth, and declared themselves stunned.“It’s just wow,” said Mr Clark, who got Maia up before dawn to drive across Florida from Newport Richey to watch the launch at the space centre.“It’s a whole new generation of kids getting excited about space. This is her third launch, she’s into space and science and I wanted to keep that interest going for the future. I came here for her future. It’s just amazing what Elon Musk has done and is doing.”Cindy and Patrick Salkeld came from California to watch their first rocket launch. “It was was overwhelming, better than expected, unbelievable. We couldn’t just see it, we could hear it and feel it vibrating the ground. It was emotional,” said Mrs Salkeld.Elon Musk, her husband said, was “brilliant”.“It’s incredible that not only did he get that rocket up there, but then he lands those two pieces right back on the ground upright, right on the circle. How on earth do you do that, it was spectacular.”Nearby were other reporters, including Miriam Kramer for Mashable. She filmed the launch, capturing the liftoff’s roar. It’s palpable. There’s still a mystery about the core rocket booster: it was supposed to land on SpaceX’s drone ship in the Atlantic, but smoke obscured the camera and then the feed cut out from vibrations on the deck.Space Twitter is concerned. Some photos to tide us over. Buzz Aldrin (@TheRealBuzz)Liftoff! We have liftoff on the #falconheavy Congratulations @SpaceX pic.twitter.com/wnEvXt425MFebruary 6, 2018 7 Feb 2018 5:00 Twitter Reply | Pick | Pick 4 Thestinger Twitter Share on Twitter Reply I bet NASA have to use the expensive defense contractors or Congress would get cross and cut their funding. Share SpaceX has started a live stream of its “starman” – the dummy in the Tesla Roadster cruising toward Mars.If you rewind to about the five-minute mark, you can catch a spectacular view of Earth. Musk tweets the highlight clip. Reply Share on Facebook Roadster clear, core booster unaccounted forThe car continues its surreal path around the planet, somewhere distant above an entire continent.Still no word from Musk or SpaceX about what happened to the core rocket booster, however. Their long silence suggests it did not land as planned on a ship in the Atlantic, but likely crashed into the sea. Report arfinillit Nogbad the Bad nellieknox Almost all rocket tests have used dummy loads. Shooting a block of concrete into the sky is the usual “frivolous” method. Share It’s difficult to overstate what SpaceX has just accomplished: it’s successfully introduced a new heavy rocket to the world, the most powerful in operation and second only to the Apollo era, all through a private company and at a fraction of a cost of other systems currently in construction.Nasa is working on its own heavy launch system, called the SLS, but it is estimated to cost about a billion dollars per flight. SpaceX estimates that Falcon Heavy launches will cost about $90m per flight.What’s more, just a few years ago the notion of re-landing reusable rockets seemed like a pipe dream, and yet SpaceX has made it routine, with regular landings on land and on a drone ship floating in the Atlantic Ocean. Today it managed to land two Falcon 9 rockets simultaneously, each dropping gracefully from the sky with a controlled burn. Twitter Report This is the launch to check the Earth’s still flat, right? | Pick Share on Twitter Share on Twitter 7 Feb 2018 5:07 Share on Twitter Facebook 7 Feb 2018 4:20 Twitter Share on Facebook Reply 7 Feb 201816:49 7 Feb 2018 7:43 | Pick Share on Facebook Smallworld5 Report because Corbyn didn’t have anything to do with it. 3 4 Share I see FrederickJFringerJr 7 Feb 2018 4:28 metalborg Reply gooner4thewin Share Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Updatedat 4.15pm EST 7 Feb 2018 4:39 Jomper Report davedave69 Share on Twitter Report Share on Facebook It will be when it crashes and kills everyone. Share Share Reply Escape. Photograph: Joe Skipper/Reuters Report TheSnial Share Share on Twitter Facebook Share on Twitter TookerBee Facebook Facebook Facebook Twitter 7 Feb 201817:08 WeaselOvercome Twitter Facebook Smallworld5 The Senate Launch System | Pick 1 2 Vanity project | Pick Twitter 8 9 Share on Twitter Share on Twitter 5 6 | Pick Report 4 Twitter Share Report 7 Feb 2018 4:19 7 Feb 2018 4:03 Reply Share on Facebook Thanks for that. As I only have a very slight passing interest in Elon Musk and his Falcon Heavy rocket programme, that was fairly entertaining (and educational). x _plank_ FrederickJFringerJr SamSmeagol 6 7 Facebook SteelyMan51 7 Feb 2018 7:27 0 1 1 2 Updatedat 5.13pm EST Share via Email Share Jonathan McDowell (@planet4589)Starman/Roadster/Stage 2 in low parking orbit. 13 min to Stage 2 restart pic.twitter.com/KUUJwidqyiFebruary 6, 2018 Two former astronauts (one a sitting senator) and Nasa’s acting administrator tweet their congratulations to SpaceX.Senator Bill Nelson spoke with reporters shortly after the launch, too, saying, “we’re going to Mars!” Elon Musk (@elonmusk)Currently over Australia 🇦🇺 pic.twitter.com/HAya3E6OEJFebruary 6, 2018 | Pick | Pick Haynes12 7 Feb 2018 4:30 Share on Twitter Reply Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Facebook Report 0 1 | Pick 7 Feb 2018 4:58 Comments 1,153 SamSmeagol 7 Feb 2018 4:35 2 3 Facebook Share on Facebook Share Share Facebook Share Twitter Christophe Meudec Threads collapsed Share on Facebook unthreaded Jonathan McDowell (@planet4589)Both side boosters down! pic.twitter.com/9U40SDtp4gFebruary 6, 2018 35 36 I wouldn’t want to be anywhere near that thing. It could go up part of the way and then come down anywhere for miles and bonk you on the head. Or worse! 7 Feb 2018 3:50 Share Reply Watching the two boosters land… land! simultaneously is simply amazing. Waiting to hear on the central booster, but it’s all just amazing stuff. Newer emiliofloris Report Jomper | Pick 130 131 7 Feb 2018 4:30 We are daily littering and polluting and destroying our climate and environment at a never before seen speed and these kids dream from outer space… LOL. Good one. Share on Facebook The blast. Photograph: Cristobal Herrera/EPA 7 Feb 2018 7:27 7 Feb 2018 4:44 Share 0 1 Newest Twitter 10 11 The drone ship is obscured in smoke and the camera cuts out thanks to vibrations from the landing burn.But SpaceX is suggesting that this doesn’t mean anything’s amiss. Pending confirmation of landing.Here’s another couple shots of that synchronized landing form the other two boosters: 2 Reply Report … 3 Sorry there was an error. Please try again later. If the problem persists, please contact Userhelp Share on Facebook Please select Personal abuse Off topic Legal issue Trolling Hate speech Offensive/Threatening language Copyright Spam Other 7 Feb 201815:52Musk’s car reaches outer space | Pick Report 2 3 View more commentslast_img read more

Democrats defend Russia inquiry in response to Republicans Nunes memo

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first_img@MartinPengelly Share via Email Share on Twitter Donald Trump US politics Martin Pengelly and agencies Shares175175 Topics Trump-Russia investigation Share on Facebook Share via Email Share on LinkedIn In the GOP memo, Republicans took aim at the FBI and the justice department over the use of information from a former British spy, Christopher Steele, in obtaining a secret warrant to monitor Page.The warrant was obtained under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, or Fisa. The main allegation in the Republican document was that the FBI and justice department did not tell the court enough about Steele’s anti-Trump bias or that his work was funded in part by Hillary Clinton’s campaign and the Democratic National Committee. They argued that the reliance on Steele’s material amounted to an improper politicization of the government’s surveillance powers. The Democratic memo countered that the justice department disclosed “the assessed political motivation of those who hired him” and that Steele was probably hired by someone “looking for information that could be used to discredit” then-candidate Trump’s campaign. Republicans said that was not enough, since the Clinton campaign and the DNC were not named. Trump himself seized on the point in a tweet on Saturday evening: “Dem Memo: FBI did not disclose who the clients were – the Clinton Campaign and the DNC. Wow!”Carl Tobias, a law professor from the University of Richmond, said the Democratic memo placed much that had transpired in context and helped “US citizens to sort out the truth”. He added: “The memo also convincingly refutes the argument that the DoJ and the FBI were duplicitous in their request to the Fisa court.” Sun 25 Feb 2018 07.37 EST Trump-Russia investigation: the key questions answered Share on Facebook Hide The memo was written by aides to Devin Nunes, chairman of the House intelligence committee and a member of the Trump transition team. The committee is investigating Russian interference in the 2016 election but the inquiry has devolved into a fight about the ​separate FBI investigation​, now​ led by special counsel Robert Mueller​. On Friday, Nunes published the memo after Donald Trump declassified it. The memo revolves around a wiretap on Carter Page, an adviser to the Trump campaign, alleging the FBI omitted key information when it applied for the wiretap. The findings “raise concerns with the legitimacy and legality of certain DoJ and FBI interactions” with the court that approves surveillance requests, the memo says. It also claims “a troubling breakdown of legal processes established to protect the American people from abuses”.The memo criticizes investigators who applied for the wiretap, saying they used material provided by an ex-British agent, Christopher Steele, without sufficiently disclosing their source. The memo says Steele was “desperate that Trump not get elected”. The memo also says texts between an FBI agent and FBI attorney “demonstrated a clear bias against Trump” and says there is “no evidence of any co-operation or conspiracy between Page” and another Trump aide under investigation, George Papadopoulos.The memo casts deputy attorney general Rod Rosenstein in a negative light. ​Rosenstein could fire Mueller. The president, said to dislike Rosenstein, could fire and replace him. The FBI ​argued against the memo’s release. Democrats wrote a rebuttal and sided with the bureau. ​The president reportedly told associates he believes the memo will help discredit the special counsel.Alan Yuhas Christopher Steele, the former MI6 agent who compiled a dossier on Donald Trump. Photograph: Victoria Jones/PA Twitter Facebook Read more Was this helpful? Share on Twitter Thank you for your feedback. First published on Sat 24 Feb 2018 17.19 EST Pinterest … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. This article is more than 1 year old Read more Since you’re here… Trump-Russia investigation FBI Adam Schiff, the ranking Democrat on the House intelligence committee, accused Republicans of seeking to ‘mislead the public’.Photograph: Michael Reynolds/EPA Support The Guardian Share on Messenger Long-awaited memo by Democrats on House intelligence committee condemns GOP document as ‘effort to undermine’ investigations Democrats defend Russia inquiry in response to Republicans’ Nunes memo Mueller investigation: Manafort accused of secretly funding European pro-Russia group Republicans Q&A What is the Nunes memo? Reuse this content Share on WhatsApp Donald Trump duly responded on Twitter, calling the Democratic memo “a total political and legal BUST” that he said “just confirms all of the terrible things that were done”. The president added: “SO ILLEGAL!”Investigations into Russian election meddling include the question of whether any Trump aides colluded in such efforts. Trump has called the investigations a “witch-hunt” and insisted there was no collusion. Some Republicans in Congress have sought to defend the president by attacking investigations by congressional committees, the FBI and special counsel Robert Mueller.Releasing his party’s document on Saturday, Adam Schiff of California, the ranking Democrat on the House intelligence panel, said in a tweet: “Some time ago, Republicans on our committee released a declassified memo that omitted and distorted key facts in order to mislead the public and impugn the integrity of the FBI. We can now tell you what they left out.”Schiff’s tweet contained a link to the 10-page, partially redacted document, which was posted to the panel’s website.The Democratic memo criticised the Republican memo as a “transparent effort to undermine” investigations. The memo also defended the FBI’s obtaining of warrants for temporary surveillance of Carter Page, an aide to Trump’s election campaign whom the Democrats said “the FBI assessed to be an agent of the Russian government”.The release came after weeks of argument over how much of the Democratic document would be redacted. The White House objected to its release on 9 February, citing national security concerns. Democrats then negotiated with the FBI on what should be blacked out.Trump had less concern about the earlier classified memo written by Republicans, known after the intelligence committee chairman as the Nunes memo, which he declassified on 2 February despite strong objections from the FBI. Trump claimed the memo “vindicated” him. Some Republicans disagreed. news Schiff also said the Democratic memo “confirms the FBI acted appropriately and that Russian agents approached two of your advisers, and informed your campaign that Russia was prepared to help you by disseminating stolen Clinton emails.”Four former Trump aides have been indicted by Mueller. They are Michael Flynn, Trump’s first national security adviser; Paul Manafort, his second campaign manager; Rick Gates, Manafort’s deputy; and George Papadopoulos, a foreign policy adviser.Flynn, Gates and Papadopoulous have accepted plea deals, seeking lighter sentences in return for cooperation. Manafort remains under house arrest on charges including money laundering and bank and tax fraud.In a statement issued on Friday, he said: “Notwithstanding that Rick Gates pled today, I continue to maintain my innocence. I had hoped and expected my business colleague would have had the strength to continue the battle to prove our innocence. For reasons yet to surface he chose to do otherwise.”This month, Mueller also indicted 13 Russian nationals alleged to have taken part in a huge effort to influence the election in favour of Trump.On Saturday, the White House press secretary, Sarah Sanders, said: “As the president has long stated, neither he nor his campaign ever colluded with a foreign power during the 2016 election, and nothing in today’s memo counters that fact.” Trump also attacked Schiff, who he called a “total phony”. Schiff responded: “Wait a minute, Mr President. Am I a phony, or sleazy, a monster or little? Surely you know the key to a good playground nickname is consistency. I thought you were supposed to be good at this.” This article is more than 1 year old Share on Pinterest Show Democrats In a long-awaited memo released on Saturday, Democrats on the House intelligence committee defended official investigations into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election.last_img read more

Sir John Sulston obituary

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first_imgLast modified on Tue 13 Mar 2018 07.02 EDT Facebook Loading comments… Trouble loading? Share on Facebook Reason (optional) Reply Report | Pick … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Shares117117 Comments 6 Share In 2002 the biologist John Sulston, who has died of stomach cancer aged 75, shared a Nobel prize for physiology. He won it for elucidating the entire sequence in which the daughters of a single cell divide and sometimes disappear as an embryo grows into an adult in the tiny roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans. However, he is much better known for leading the British team that sequenced a third of the human genome, and for the fierce integrity with which he successfully argued that all genomic data should be openly accessible to the scientific community without commercial involvement.Previously content to pursue his work out of the public eye, in 1998 Sulston found himself catapulted on to the front pages as the publicly funded Human Genome Project (HGP) faced competition from a rival, private genome-sequencing project launched by the American geneticist Craig Venter’s Celera Genomics. Sulston took every opportunity to challenge, on both ethical and scientific grounds, a model in which access to the data would be controlled by commercial licence agreements. Share on Messenger His arguments helped to persuade the HGP’s principal funders, the National Institutes of Health in the US and the Wellcome Trust in the UK, to increase their support for the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium, which carried it out, even though Venter claimed Celera would do the job more cheaply and in half the time.The different methods used by the two teams made it difficult to judge any claim to be “winning the race”, but Venter’s intervention stimulated the HGP to increase its output. The outcome became politically charged, and in June 2000, at press conferences addressed by Bill Clinton and Tony Blair, the result was declared a draw as both sides announced the completion of a “draft” sequence.The international consortium finally published the complete, high-quality sequence in 2003, on the 50th anniversary of James Watson and Francis Crick’s discovery of the double helix structure of DNA. The sequence, freely available as Sulston urged, has provided a reference for all subsequent research into the way human biology is controlled at the molecular level: it has enabled scientists to pinpoint genetic mutations that cause disease and to design more targeted therapies for cancer.Sulston recognised that he was not the kind of scientist who dreamed up hypotheses of potentially explanatory force and put them to the test. Instead he saw his science as principally Baconian, or, more unflatteringly, ignorance-driven: comprehensive collection of data, which then provides a resource for others to test their own hypotheses. His work on the worm-cell lineage first introduced him to the power of this approach. The lineage provided a road map for others to follow as they studied genetic mutations that disrupted normal development. Sulston’s colleague Bob Horvitz shared the Nobel prize for revealing how genes control developmental processes such as cell death, a universal mechanism critically relevant to cancer research.It also provided the first illustration of the tenacity with which Sulston would pursue projects he had embarked on, whatever the obstacles in his way. From the mid-1970s until 1982, he sat over a microscope in the Medical Research Council’s Laboratory of Molecular Biology (LMB) in Cambridge and watched cells dividing, first in the worm larva with Horvitz and then in the embryo on his own, day after day until they had the whole lineage from one to 959 cells. A brilliant practical experimentalist, he developed a method of freezing worms without killing them, so that he could leave them overnight and continue the next day.The same tenacity characterised his decision in 1983 to embark on mapping the worm genome, putting identified lengths of DNA known as clones into order as an aid to finding genes. While the lineage was largely a solo operation, he undertook the mapping in partnership with Alan Coulson at the LMB, and later also with Bob Waterston at the University of Washington in St Louis. He liked partnerships and was a wonderful collaborator, as I had the privilege of discovering myself when we wrote a book together (The Common Thread, 2002).The map opened the way to sequencing. Reading off the 100 million As, Cs, Gs and Ts (the initials of the four types of bases of a DNA molecule) of the worm genome seemed an impossible task to many, but with funding from the HGP – then led by Watson – Sulston and Waterston got started. By 1992 the worm sequencing project was going so well that the Wellcome Trust asked Sulston to head a new sequencing institute that would not only finish the worm sequence but also contribute substantially to the human genome sequence of 3bn “letters”.He felt “swept along like a leaf on the stream”. Managing teams of people was not something he relished, but he accepted it as the price he would have to pay for getting the worm sequence done. The Sanger Centre (now the Sanger Institute) opened in 1993 near Cambridge, initially as an automated factory for producing sequence data, with Sulston as its director.Similar sequencing centres were being established elsewhere in the world as the Human Genome Project formally got under way, some with an eye to the commercial possibilities of patenting newly discovered genes. With the support of the Wellcome Trust, Sulston convened the first of a number of international strategy meetings in Bermuda in February 1996. It clarified who were likely to be the major players in the human genome effort and sorted out competing claims to sequence individual chromosomes.However, its most significant outcome was the set of Bermuda principles, hammered out under Sulston’s chairmanship, that all sequencing data would be released immediately and for public benefit. This was what Sulston and his colleagues had always done with the worm data, a practice that had massively increased opportunities for scientists around the world to answer biological questions using the worm as a model. Keeping the genome sequence in the public domain became for him a moral duty against threats such as that posed by Celera two years later.Born in Fulmer, Buckinghamshire, John was the son of the Rev Canon Ted Sulston and his wife, Muriel (nee Blocksidge); he had a sister, Madeleine. His father, a former army chaplain, worked as overseas secretary to the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel and his mother was an English teacher. “From them both I gained a sense that there is not, or need not be, any clear distinction between work and play,” John wrote, “and that one has a duty both to serve others and to do the best one can in everything.”He spent his childhood taking apart and rebuilding radios or dissecting dead animals, anything to satisfy his curiosity about how things worked. By his teens he had decided that his father’s religious faith made no sense to him, and, as his scientific studies progressed, he began to feel “a sudden overwhelming sense of the power of the human mind”.The family was not well off, but they found the money to send John to a private preparatory school. He won a scholarship to the academically ambitious Merchant Taylors’ school for boys, a few miles from his home in Rickmansworth, in south-west Hertfordshire, and then another to Pembroke College, Cambridge, to study natural sciences. Bored with book-learning and temporarily diverted by an interest in stage lighting for student drama productions, he failed to obtain a first-class degree; but the professor of organic chemistry, the Nobel prizewinner Alexander Todd, accepted him to study for a doctorate. With his supervisor, Colin Reese, he worked on the synthesis of oligonucleotides, the building blocks of DNA.From that moment Sulston realised that the laboratory was his natural habitat.On obtaining his doctorate in 1966 he married Daphne Bate, a research assistant in the Cambridge geophysics department, and went to California to work with Leslie Orgel at the Salk Institute on the molecular origins of life. With their daughter, Ingrid, on the way, he and Daphne rented a wooden house five miles from the campus and saved money by growing their own vegetables.Invited by Crick, Sulston returned to Cambridge in 1969 to work at the LMB: his son, Adrian, was born soon afterwards. He joined the small team led by Sydney Brenner (who also shared the 2002 Nobel prize), who had seized on the worm C elegans as a model to develop a complete understanding of the genetic control of development and behaviour. Generous resources for equipment (though little space), a non-hierarchical approach to management and a commitment to the science characterised the LMB ethos, which Sulston subsequently tried to replicate as director of the Sanger Centre.When the sequence of the worm genome, which Sulston regarded as his true life’s work, was published in 1998, he handed in his notice as director. But he did not finally step down until his successor was appointed in 2000, and remained fully engaged with the HGP until the publication of the finished human sequence in 2003.Thereafter he devoted his time to causes related to open access and human well-being. In 2008 he became founding co-chair, with the bioethicist John Harris, of the Institute for Science, Ethics and Innovation at the University of Manchester, retiring in 2013. He chaired a Royal Society commission on People and the Planet, which reported in 2012.Recently he had devoted more time to his favourite pastimes, hill walking and gardening, and supported local voluntary organisations such as Cambridge Past, Present and Future.A lifelong Guardian-reading, beard-and-sandals socialist, Sulston lived by his own principles: he never did anything for money and much of what he received he quietly gave away.The frugal cheese sandwich that he made for his lunch each day was a source of amusement to his colleagues at the Sanger. But he was anything but hairshirted – he loved nothing better than an evening with friends over a few pints or a meal with his family.Offered a knighthood in 2001, he hesitated before accepting the honour as a recognition not of himself but of the whole sequencing team, and because he recognised, correctly, that the title would give him a platform to promote his ideas. In June last year he was made a Companion of Honour.He faced his illness, diagnosed only a month before his death, with his customary stoicism.John is survived by Daphne, his children, Ingrid and Adrian, his grandchildren, Micah and Kira, and by Madeleine.• John Edward Sulston, biologist, born 27 March 1942; died 6 March 2018 A truly honourable man. Never do anything only for money – how (currently) counter-cultural is that? I’m sure he leaves many legacies, but keeping the Human Genome Project in the public domain is definitely one of them. I could probably teach a half year undergraduate course dealing solely with his contributions to science (and their manifold ramifications). His career is also a brilliant testimony of the wisdom and benefits of the approach adopted by the MRC-LMB. In the North American granting system one would be quite unlikely to obtain a grant to study the pattern of cell divisions in a transparent nematode embryo. Both this project, and his next endeavour, to create a physical map of the C. elegans genome (which led to the entire DNA sequence of an animal—the first to be completed), both spawned multiple Nobel Prizes (not just his own). Todd Harris reflects on his first meeting with Dr. J.E. Sulston, FRS, over on Medium: https://medium.com/@toddharris.phd/i-taught-john-sulston-everything-he-already-knew-about-c-elegans-c0370dcdd167?source=linkShare-3566df3250b9-1520947990 Share on Twitter Since you’re here… recommendations Facebook Report Genetics andywalker FreePal 13 Mar 2018 21:43 Science prizes Share on Facebook Cancer obituaries | Pick People in science BowerBird79 newest 100 Reply 13 Mar 2018 4:18 Reuse this content,View all comments > Sir John Sulston obituary Order by oldest Pinterest All Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Email (optional) Facebook Report Twitter Share on Twitter Genetics Reply Share on Twitter oldest Twitter expanded | Pick Sun 11 Mar 2018 11.19 EDT Twitter Georgina Ferry | Pick Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Rest in peace, Sir John. A life well lived, and a contribution to the knowledge and welfare of the human race that is beyond calculation. Reach back into 2011 archive of ‘A Life Scientific’ to spend a precious half hour with this kind, decent, heroic man. My condolences to his family. 50 Share on WhatsApp Twitter Reply Report A truly great man. I’m sorry I’ll never meet him but his work not only on genomics but science in society leaves a massive legacy for all of us. Share Share on LinkedIn Share on Facebook 4 5 12 Mar 2018 15:13 3 4 His contribution to humanity is rightly his memorial. Every advance that’s based on human gene sequences has been made more possible by his achievements. That’s pretty good going. Share | Pick Share on Twitter Share on Pinterest Share on Facebook Sulston’s study of the tiny roundwormCaenorhabditis elegans helped to unlock knowledge about human genes. Photograph: MPG/EPA 13 Mar 2018 3:45 Show 25 Facebook Reply Human Genome Project Report unthreaded Cyclist30mph Share on Facebook Topics 4 5 Threads collapsed Share Share via Email Facebook Share on Facebook Twitter Share via Email Twitter mdperry 2 3 Sorry there was an error. Please try again later. If the problem persists, please contact Userhelp Facebook collapsed Facebook 12 Mar 2018 15:15 | Pick Share 4 5 Nobel prizes Report John Sulston in his Cambridge laboratory in 2002.Photograph: Chris Young/PA Share on Facebook 14 Mar 2018 6:13 Biology Reply 1 2 Sign in or create your Guardian account to recommend a comment Share on Twitter Pioneering biologist best known for his work on the human genome who was a fierce advocate of free access to scientific data A truly remarkable man. An intellectual and moral giant. ZankFrappa comments (6)Sign in or create your Guardian account to join the discussion. Please select Personal abuse Off topic Legal issue Trolling Hate speech Offensive/Threatening language Copyright Spam Other Share Report Support The Guardian 25 Twitter Close report comment form View more commentslast_img read more

Rise for Climate thousands march across US to protest environment crisis

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first_imgTens of thousands of people took part in marches and other events across the US on Saturday, calling for a swift transition to renewable energy in order to stave off the various perils of climate change. This article is more than 10 months old Share on Facebook Activism Protests spearheaded by march in San Francisco ahead of climate change summit in the city next week Hundreds of thousands expected to join global climate marches this weekend First published on Sat 8 Sep 2018 11.55 EDT Share on Pinterest @olliemilman Climate change Climate change Share via Email Share on Twitter Several thousand people took part in a climate march in New York City on Thursday. Ten activists were arrested after blocking the street in front of Andrew Cuomo’s Manhattan office.Photograph: Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/REX/Shutterstock Sat 8 Sep 2018 17.07 EDT Support The Guardian Share via Email Share on Twitter Reuse this content This article is more than 10 months oldcenter_img … in our natural world, we refuse to turn away from the climate catastrophe and species extinction. For The Guardian, reporting on the environment is a priority. We give reporting on climate, nature and pollution the prominence it deserves, stories which often go unreported by others in the media. At this pivotal time for our species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on scientific facts, not political prejudice or business interests.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. New York Rise for Climate: thousands march across US to protest environment crisis Share on LinkedIn Read more Oliver Milman in New York Protest Share on Facebook Topics news Share on Messenger Shares618618 The Rise for Climate protests was spearheaded by what organizers called the largest ever climate march on the US west coast. The march, which snaked through the heart of San Francisco, came ahead of a climate change summit in the city next week that will gather mayors and business leaders from around the world.The San Francisco march, which called for California governor Jerry Brown to end fossil fuel extraction in the state, attracted around 30,000 people, organizers said.An array of activities, including rallies, voter registration drives and vigils, were scheduled to take place across the US, in cities such as Boston, Miami and Portland, Oregon. Events were also planned in Puerto Rico. In New Orleans, protesters planned to agitate for the halt of the Bayou Bridge pipeline, an extension of the controversial Dakota Access project that last year spurred a lengthy standoff at the Standing Rock reservation.Hundreds of other actions took place in cities around the world, as part of a coordinated effort to counter what climate activists see as the dangerously regressive policies of Donald Trump’s administration, which has sought to dismantle rules to lower greenhouse gas emissions and has thrown open vast areas of land and water to drilling.“Today, people across the country are rising up for climate, jobs and justice in their communities to fight back against Trump’s toxic agenda and to send a message to every politician that the time for action is now,” said Michael Brune, executive director of environment group the Sierra Club.“Families living in the shadows of coal plants and oil refineries, losing homes and livelihoods to wildfires and extreme weather, and struggling to make a living wage are coming together because we know we don’t have time to waste.”The activists’ ire is largely aimed at governors who though relatively progressive on climate issues, such as Brown and New York governor Andrew Cuomo, are deemed not to be ambitious enough in phasing out fossil fuels. On Thursday, several thousand people took part in a climate march in New York City. Ten activists were arrested after blocking the street in front of Cuomo’s Manhattan office.A week of protests are planned surrounding the summit in San Francisco, with organizers hoping to draw attention to air pollution and social inequity that has tainted California’s economic growth.“Climate change, economic inequality, the housing crisis, increased criminalization, attacks on immigrant communities – all these challenges are driven by systemic devaluation of the lives of people of color and choosing profit over people and the planet,” said Gladys Limon, executive director of the California Environmental Justice Alliance.“We are standing up to life destructive industries, from big oil to natural gas companies, that obstruct progress toward a healthy, sustainable and just society.” As the crisis escalates… San Francisco Renewable energy Energy Share on WhatsApplast_img read more

Trump refuses to rule out Manafort pardon – live updates

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first_imgShare on Facebook 29 Nov 201816:00 Facebook US politics live Ben Jacobs in Washington Tim Mak (@timkmak)Sen. Corker, the chair of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, is acting as if this Yemen resolution WILL pass an initial procedural hurdle today https://t.co/ndAUnR7DZcNovember 28, 2018 Shares1,1501150 Twitter 29 Nov 201814:26 Facebook Facebook Twitter Newer Show Donald Trump It looks like Democrats will pick up another seat in California, taking their total gains for the cycle to 40 seats. Chad Pergram (@ChadPergram)Senate votes to begin debate on resolution to end U.S. military support for the war in Yemen. The vote was 63-37. Unclear if they actually vote on the resolution tonight..or punt to next week. It’s up in the air where they go next.November 28, 2018 Share via Email 29 Nov 201814:43Nancy Pelosi nominated to be Speaker Reuse this content Twitter Live feed The Senate has voted to advance the resolution on YemenThe Senate has taken the first step to curb U.S. support for the Saudi backed coalition in Yemen Facebook One Democrat who voted against Pelosi today in the caucus says that he won’t support her on the floor in January either. Nancy Pelosi overcame the first hurdle in her quest to become Speaker again as 203 Democrats supported her in an internal election. She still needs 218 votes on the floor in January.The Senate voted to start debate on a resolution to end U.S. support for the Saudi-backed coalition in Yemen.The Senate also voted to advance the controversial nomination of Thomas Farr to the federal bunch after Mike Pence cast a tiebreaking vote.Hakeem Jeffries won a contested election to become Democratic caucus chair and position himself as a potential future Speaker of the House.In an interview with the New York Post, Donald Trump refused to rule out a pardon of Paul Manafort. The cuisine at the Democratic leadership elections is not exactly gourmet. This is a good guide to what Nancy Pelosi needs to do in January to become Speaker. Key events Share on WhatsApp 29 Nov 201816:20 29 Nov 201815:52 Ben Jacobs (@Bencjacobs)Democrat Conor Lamb says he didn’t vote for Pelosi in caucus today and will not do so on the floor in January pic.twitter.com/uw7aMlHnY7November 28, 2018 Wed 28 Nov 2018 16.57 EST The vote is over on the Senate taking up the Yemen resolution. It passes by a 63-37 margin. Updatedat 3.01pm EST Trump refuses to rule out Manafort pardon – live updates,President tells New York Post pardon was never discussed ‘but I wouldn’t take it off the table’Sign up to the Guardian’s new US morning briefing Facebook 29 Nov 2018 16:33 Twitter US politics AP Politics (@AP_Politics)BREAKING: Pelosi nominated by House Democrats to lead them in new Congress, but showdown vote for speaker awaits in JanuaryNovember 28, 2018 Facebook Updated 29 Nov 2018,Donald Trump walks to board the Marine One helicopter to begin his travel to Mississippi on 26 November.Photograph: Jonathan Ernst/Reuters 29 Nov 201816:17 Trump refuses to rule out Manafort pardonIn a new interview with the New York Post, President Donald Trump refused to rule out a pardon for Paul Manafort. Share on LinkedIn Facebook Twitter Seth Moulton, one of the leading Democratic critics of Pelosi within the caucus, has just released a statement insisted that she does not have the 218 votes necessary to be Speaker. Facebook 29 Nov 201816:33 Facebook 29 Nov 201815:02 29 Nov 201816:23Stormy Daniels says Avenatti sued Trump without permission 1 of 5 Bob Corker, the chair of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, lays out on the process on the Yemen resolution and seems to assume it will pass. Summary Cameron Joseph (@cam_joseph).@claudiatenney has officially conceded. pic.twitter.com/ELAY0k7CccNovember 28, 2018 This is a good map to compare last night’s result in Mississippi to the last competitive Senate race in the Magnolia State. Facebook 29 Nov 201813:43Thomas Farr’s nomination advances Showcenter_img Facebook Facebook 29 Nov 201816:42 Facebook Twitter 29 Nov 201816:17The Senate has voted to advance the resolution on Yemen Twitter Twitter 29 Nov 201816:23 Twitter Share on Twitter Topics Share on Twitter Pelosi wins Speaker nomination handilyPelosi did far better than she did the last time she received a challenge with over 200 members supporting her in the caucus. She is still short of the 218 votes she needs on the floor though. Nancy Pelosi nominated to be SpeakerPelosi has cleared the first hurdle but still needs 218 votes on the floor in January. Updatedat 4.32pm EST Share via Email Republican Claudia Tenney, who lost her bid for re-election in upstate New York, has finally conceded. Facebook Paul Kane (@pkcapitol)The pizza has arrived at House Dem leadership votes & it is … Domino’s? Ugh. pic.twitter.com/M0rNrCHrqSNovember 28, 2018 Share on Pinterest 29 Nov 201816:24 29 Nov 201814:55 Facebook Unlike many news organisations, we chose an approach that means all our reporting is free and available for everyone. We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. For as little as $1 you can support us – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Make a contribution – The Guardian 29 Nov 201816:06 US politics live 29 Nov 201814:55Trump refuses to rule out Manafort pardon Stormy Daniels says Avenatti sued Trump without permissionStormy Daniels says that Michael Avenatti sued Trump without her permission and has not been transparent about money raised on her behalf via a Go Fund Me.In a statement, Daniels says: US news @Bencjacobs Share on Facebook Twitter Lauren Gambino (@laurenegambino).@sethmoulton releases a statement after meeting with Pelosi: “I am disappointed to report that no agreement was reached in this initial meeting. We are hopeful Leader Pelosi will invite us back to the table to plan for the future success of the Democratic Party.” pic.twitter.com/MsnwPheojgNovember 28, 2018 29 Nov 201814:43 “I haven’t decided yet what to do about legal representation moving forward. Michael has been a great advocate in many ways. I’m tremendously grateful to him for aggressively representing me in my fight to regain my voice. But in other ways Michael has not treated me with the respect and deference an attorney should show to a client. He has spoken on my behalf without my approval. He filed a defamation case against Donald Trump against my wishes. He repeatedly refused to tell me how my legal defense fund was being spent. Now he has launched a new crowdfunding campaign using my face and name without my permission and attributing words to me that I never wrote or said. I’m deeply grateful to my supporters and they deserve to know their money is being spent responsibly. I don’t want to hurt Michael, but it’s time to set the record straight. The truth has always been my greatest ally. US news Dave Wasserman (@Redistrict)Projection: T.J. Cox (D) has defeated Rep. David Valadao (R) in #CA21, an upset that brings Dems to a *40 seat* gain overall.Final House breakdown: 235D, 200R.November 28, 2018 29 Nov 201814:56 Twitter Twitter Older 29 Nov 201816:57 Presidential candidate John Delaney is about to play Tetris on a livestream with the Washington Post’s Dave Weigel.Delaney is the first 2020 candidate to already visit all 99 counties in Iowa but not the first to play an 80s video game with Weigel. Cory Booker played PacMan with him last month. Twitter Lauren Gambino (@laurenegambino)Nancy Pelosi gets 203 yes votes, 32 Nos, per source in the roomNovember 28, 2018 Twitter Newest 29 Nov 201811:58Hakeem Jeffries elected Democrat Caucus Chair Marianna Sotomayor (@MariannaNBCNews)What Pelosi needs to do before the House floor vote in January —> https://t.co/q2ep2JsyqMNovember 28, 2018 29 Nov 201815:52Pelosi wins Speaker nomination handily Facebook Elizabeth Landers (@ElizLanders)Trump tells NY Post of a pardon for Manafort: “It was never discussed, but I wouldn’t take it off the table. Why would I take it off the table?” https://t.co/YvPbTDRJSNNovember 28, 2018 Twitter Oldest 29 Nov 201816:21 J. Miles Coleman (@JMilesColeman)Last night’s #MSSen result was probably most comparable to the 2008 special election. Sen. Wicker (R) won 55/45 then. What’s changed over 10 years? Not surprisingly, many metro & delta-area counties moved to Espy while the rural northeast & gulf region swung the most R. #mselex pic.twitter.com/fhLUFKt2vnNovember 28, 2018 Share on Messenger Twitter First published on Wed 28 Nov 2018 09.17 EST Laura Litvan (@LauraLitvan)NEW: The Senate has the votes to advance Yemen resolution. Voting continuesNovember 28, 2018last_img read more

Democrats want a smart wall Thats Trumps wall by another name

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first_img Share on Facebook US immigration Democrats want a ‘smart wall’. That’s Trump’s wall by another name Share on Facebook Reply Zepp | Pick Thu 14 Feb 2019 09.59 EST 12 13 1 2 Amman1992 Share on Facebook Shares455455 Facebook Share It is not illegal to cross the border without a visa if you are seeking asylum. Report Share on Twitter Late last month, Democratic party leadership released a proposal for “smart, efficient border security”. It’s all but certain that the compromise deal will include elements from this proposal, given the buy-in from almost all Democrats, wary of another government shutdown but untroubled by demands from groups like ours to back down from the creation of a “smart wall” using untested, biased technology.Our calls have been ignored. The Democrats are prepared, as the House majority whip, Jim Clyburn, has made clear, to give Trump billions – so long as it is spent on a tech wall, not a physical one.“I’ve said that we ought to have a smart wall. I defined that as a wall using drones to make it too high to get over, using x-ray equipment to make it too wide to get around, and using scanners to go deep enough not to be able to tunnel under it,” said Clyburn. “To me, that would be a smart thing to do.”We should be extremely cautious about increasing funding for a “smart wall”. Such a wall will amass profits for military companies like Raytheon, tech firms like Amazon, and private prison makers like Geo Group, but do nothing to solve the humanitarian crisis at our southern border.It will also likely lead to civil rights violations writ large – not just for migrants, but for the two-thirds of the American population who live within 100 miles of the border around the US as a whole. Eventually, surveillance technology perfected at the border could be repurposed against us all, as is often the case when new tech is rolled out first against the most vulnerable populations.Noteworthy among the proposed investments are more funding for “air and marine operations” along the border, the “expansion of risk-based targeting of passengers”, and unspecified “cutting-edge technology” that would “improve situational awareness”. In other words: drones, artificial intelligence, and untested surveillance technology.Customs and Border Protection would probably use all within the zone 100 miles of a land or coastal border that is already subject to fewer constitutional rights than the rest of the country, despite a full two-thirds of the American people living in it. What happens when border drones begin operating in this zone, taking photos of 200 million people in the name of national security and storing their faces in large, privatized databases? This does nothing to address the root causes of migration. It punishes the most vulnerable among us 14 Feb 2019 23:49 Amman1992 Report Democrats want a ‘smart wall’. That’s Mays border by another name 14 Feb 2019 23:28 Facebook Support The Guardian Topics Share on Facebook They are not seeking “illegal jobs” or “illegal housing”. They would much prefer legal ones. The illegal ones are the only ones open to them, and there is an easy solution to that. William Anthony Marisa Franco Share on Facebook | Pick 14 Feb 2019 23:54 next 15 Feb 2019 0:05 Twitter Share Share on WhatsApp Show 23 more replies Facebook Share on Twitter 2 3 Share on Facebook Email (optional) Reply 15 Feb 2019 0:20 Share on Facebook Share 3 4 Reply Donald Trump Report Reply A lot of people have a sort of childlike belief that cybertechnology is infallible. It isn’t. Drones can be brought down by lasers. Thermal imaging can be defeated by cheap mylar blankets. Motion-sensitive CCTV cameras are relatively easy to fool.The country is crashing into debt thanks to Republican efforts to steal the wealth of the nation for their rich masters, and the argument is over how to spend billions more on a problem that only barely exists as a problem, let alone an existential crisis? Share on Twitter Report 40 41 pshelleyg … Share Share on Twitter Report Twitter Reply Facebook Share on Twitter Twitter 15 Feb 2019 0:35 nosecolouredglasses Show 25 Share on Facebook Twitter Share Share on Facebook Report Share MightyBuccaneer Share Twitter JonShone Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share Show 12 more replies Reply Share Twitter Facebook | Pick Read more Twitter Zepp Share I don’t think many people are saying those things are infallible. They’re saying they’re mostly effective and cost a lot less than building a concrete wall. 15 Feb 2019 0:04 Report 15 Feb 2019 0:06 Share on Twitter Share on Twitter 16 17 Report I’m impressed with how well you have regurgitated the current dishonest talking points on FOX News. Facebook | Pick Facebook 14 Feb 2019 23:13 14 Feb 2019 23:42 Share on Facebook This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. nosecolouredglasses jjreynolds2004 91 92 Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Reply Facebook 14 Feb 2019 23:55 Share via Email nosecolouredglasses | Pick Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Twitter 15 Feb 2019 0:01 Show 2 more replies 0 1 William Anthony 14 Feb 2019 23:28 Total naivety. But that Trump for you. Share on Twitter JonPurrtree A government shutdown deal seems to have been reached. Details are scant, and it’s still unclear whether the president will sign the deal, but the rough outline is there: more detention beds, more fencing, and more funding for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS).The Democrats, in other words, are conceding to Trump’s calls for increased border security. Importantly, their increased funding for DHS includes miscellaneous “technology” spending, which, given past statements, is likely to include drones, artificial intelligence, and unspecified “cutting-edge technology”. PhilosophicalSquid Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Facebook JonPurrtree Twitter 14 Feb 2019 23:40 100 101 24 25 Share lightchaser 14 Feb 2019 23:58 You do have a terrific imagination! I salute you. Share on Twitter Twitter Twitter The Democrats seem prepares, with their ‘smart, efficient’ border security proposal, to give Trump billions.Photograph: Joe Raedle/Getty Images Strummered Yep. I think you pretty much summed it up. Nice work. | Pick Facebook next PhilosophicalSquid Share Report … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Sign in or create your Guardian account to recommend a comment Reply Share Report charlieblue 13 14 Share aquacalc Report Twitter 15 Feb 2019 0:27 Share on Facebook Report Share on Facebook Share 15 Feb 2019 2:00 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter | Pick Share on Facebook Report | Pick Reply | Pick William Anthony Report Share on Twitter Report Share on Facebook Facebook Dwight Spencer charlieblue I do hope you Liberal/Leftys do not lock your doors or windows – what hypocrites you would be if you do. And if you have an alarm system!!!!!! Total hypocrites, You care nothing about crime as long as it is not your ivory tower they are scaling. 4 5 That’s a moot point now. Since the advent of the Patriot Act and ancillary legislation the Bill of Rights have been reduced to basically window dressing and little more. Because of legislation related to the WOT, the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth amendments have been relegated to conditional status, at best. Report Share on Twitter Report 3 4 Reply | Pick expanded Facebook Indeed; he (or she) who is prepared to sacrifice liberty for security deserves neither. Twitter 15 Feb 2019 0:31 Share on Twitter Meanwhile the Trump comms team is tweeting anti-vaccination slogans and I quote “Bring back our #ChildhoodDiseases”!!! Read more 7 8 Contact author 15 Feb 2019 0:11 8 9 Share on Twitter Democrats More what-about-isms. Republicans are masters of people in big fat glass houses that throw stones. Report William Anthony 15 Feb 2019 0:12 Reply Any sovereign state has a right to secure its borders for the benefit of its citizens.That’s protecting civil rights, not violating them.If people and families are being inhumanely treated at the border, that’s a violation of human rights. Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Facebook Share nosecolouredglasses 15 Feb 2019 3:50 Share on Twitter All Reply 14 Feb 2019 23:45 Twitter Share on Twitter MoonlightTiger Facebook 4 Report 34 35 Twitter 30 31 Share on Twitter Reply ID3910692 Report Facebook Facebook Report Share Reply Opinion | Pick 21 22 3 Share ButtChocolate Facebook Loading comments… Trouble loading? Facebook Order by oldest charlieblue Twitter Well there’s me completely reassured! Comms director’s wife may be basth*t crazy but Comms director must be rational as they come. Facebook Twitter Twitter 6 7 3 4 | Pick That wall already exists: it’s called Leavenworth… Twitter It’s the Dems throwing that fat baboon a crumb, and everyone knows it. It was a path to give some somewhat sane Republicans a back door so that the ideologues didn’t push Humpty-Dumpty to pull a shutdown again. It’s obviously not a wall, and to spin it here in any other way is dishonest journalism. 15 Feb 2019 0:44 HistoryHacker 0 1 Share on Facebook Twitter 1 2 Share on Facebook Reply Share on Facebook 10 11 2 22 23 Share on Twitter 4 5 Twitter Joe Soap 15 Feb 2019 0:24 Reply Reply Share Share Please select Personal abuse Off topic Legal issue Trolling Hate speech Offensive/Threatening language Copyright Spam Other Twitter popgoesthepop Share Report pshelleyg 15 Feb 2019 0:52 4 Share 14 Feb 2019 23:45 AnotherDutchman Share on Twitter 14 Feb 2019 23:58 Isn’t that a military prison ? Reply Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Social36 PaniscusTroglodytes 25 31 32 Report Report Share | Pick Twitter Share on Twitter William Anthony 14 Feb 2019 23:58 Report Threads collapsed Share on Facebook ghstwrtrx7 Share on Twitter Share I know you’re just trying to make a political jibe, but it doesn’t do anything for the quality of a debate. The situation is different. People from the EU aren’t going to come in large numbers for illegal jobs, illegal housing, and no healthcare. If there is a situation where 100’s of thousands of people arrive in Ireland from Africa it might look a little like the border in the USA (or indeed Spain/Africa). I’m going to guess that EU nationals will be allowed into the UK anyway via Calais – no need to go via northern Ireland. Jeffery Cash Weigand | Pick Share on Facebook Reply Twitter | Pick KevinFinn | Pick Share on Twitter Twitter Reply That’s what Obama did. Where was the outrage when he separated families? charlieblue Since you’re here… Reply There is no more need to collect data on US citizens. They have done that already and all information is stored, all your devices tuned to spy and add to your file.So you need some new people – immigrants from so far not totally monitored countries – to keep that system growing. Oh, and please do not say:you did not know this. That was exposed years ago. Share on Twitter Twitter Facebook Report William Anthony 14 Feb 2019 23:47 Facebook 0 1 Reply Reply 15 Feb 2019 0:55 14 Feb 2019 23:47 Facebook Joe Soap Share on Facebook 15 Feb 2019 0:04 Facebook | Pick | Pick Share on Facebook 9 10 3 4 Reply 4 5 Share on Twitter Twitter “Surely the same rules should apply to everyone?” When has Trump ever really played by the rules? Where are his tax returns? Still in audit? His wall is an act of colossal folly an abolute joke. It’s an expensive ludicrous statement that he wants everyone else to pay for. There are currently millions of government employees on tenterhooks wondering whether his idiocy will stop them getting paid again and their work not getting done. The whole country suffers accordingly. When I lived in the US I knew many of the Irish, Brits, French, polish barmen etc who came over on a normal three month visa and stayed. It happens all the time, not just in the US either. What do you want to do, microchip tourists so they self destruct after three months if they don’t leave? 21 22 15 Feb 2019 0:17 Report Twitter Reprobus Marmaritarum Share Amman1992 10 11 Reply 5 6 Twitter “Not really relevant.”It *is* relevant inasmuch as it was tacit admission of the problem. (Just like Bill Clinton’s many transgressions were.) But *both* sides play the so-called “politics of revenge”, the better to accumulate power, so the committed Left ignores the issues with Obama (and Clinton) in the same way that the committed Right ignores those of Trump. The rest of us? Oh, we have our disagreements, but we can get along. (And we’d get along so much better without the inflexible Lefties and the inflexible Righties.) | Pick Report newest EdChamp Reuse this content,View all comments > recommendations Share Congress passes deal to avert shutdown as Trump plans emergency declaration to build wall – as it happened Not quite. It is the wife of the Comms director, or asst director, so NOT WH policy! Reply 15 Feb 2019 0:13 34 35 Report Twitter Twitter | Pick 7evenPoint charlieblue KevinFinn Report 15 Feb 2019 0:21 Share | Pick Share on Twitter Share 19 20 Share Reply Twitter Share on Facebook nevesone Trump claims ‘wall is being built’ and mocks O’Rourke at El Paso rally Share charlieblue Facebook Why not just process to legalize these folks. If they want to work, us farmers would love to have help; we need it! Truck drivers would be another line of work for them. The US is very short of truck drivers. Good comment. MightyBuccaneer Share on Facebook Share Share Twitter 3 SeniorFigure lightchaser 1 2 This article is full of paranoid nonsense. Contrary to lefty assertions there’s nothing inherently immoral, illegal or unethical about the US putting up a protective barrier on our territory. (Whether this wall will actually be effective is another matter). The heart of the issue is that some people believe the US has no right to build a wall (or barrier or smart wall or whatever you want to call it). All these other arguments against the wall are incidental and besides the point. collapsed Keep in mind that Obama was the deporter- in- chief…it isn’t mentioned much aloud as it doesn’t fit the meme but he made Bush look like a cream puff when it came to “illegals”… Share on Facebook 15 Feb 2019 2:55 pshelleyg Share Share on Facebook Reply 15 Feb 2019 0:21 14 Feb 2019 23:59 | Pick Twitter 1 2 Twitter Not really relevant. Pointing at somebody else doesn’t justify Fat Donny’s stupid wall. SirJoshuaReynolds Share 15 Feb 2019 0:37 Share on Twitter Shame he didn’t mention Roman Emperor Hadrian’s Wall. Now THAT was one heck of a wall! Share Share Reply Share on Facebook 14 Feb 2019 23:56 This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. There is no need for a hard border. Trump can put in a “smart” border instead and consult with his political allies in the ERG. There is no need for border infrastructure for freedom of movement. How do we know? Because the Brexiteers tell us it is possible. Amman1992 This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. Reply Report Share on Facebook | Pick Share Report MoonlightTiger aquacalc Share The intelligent people on the Left need to create a wall to protect themselves from the Darwin-award-winning losers on the Right. Share on Facebook Report MightyBuccaneer | Pick Share on Pinterest Share Twitter Share on Twitter Share comment Comments 531 HistoryHacker Share on Facebook This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. Share on Facebook Twitter KMdude Share Reply | Pick Reply JonShone 6 7 Reply Facebook lionfood KevinFinn Share on Facebook Facebook 14 Feb 2019 23:41 Reply oldest Share on Twitter Share on Twitter | Pick Share on Twitter 14 Feb 2019 23:52 Facebook Report Share on Twitter Share Reply Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Reprobus Marmaritarum Facebook 12 13 Share on Twitter Share on Twitter William Anthony Report ph1989 15 Feb 2019 0:05 14 Feb 2019 23:59 5 6 Share on Twitter 14 Feb 2019 23:15 William Anthony Share on Facebook Facebook 23 24 Reply | Pick 14 Feb 2019 23:44 Show 3 more replies Facebook No, it doesn’t cost as much as a wall! Trump wanted 20 billion, he’s getting 1.3b, less than the original offer before the shutdown. Plus, most independent estimates figured the wall’s actual cost would be closer to 30-50 billion. Hint: 1.3 is not 99% of 20-50 billion! Nor is it for the wall he wanted. He wanted a massive concrete barrier, he’s getting a few extra miles of the same type of fencing that’s been used before, etc. Get your facts — and math — straight before spewing propaganda against legislation designed to avoid another shut down. The civil liberty issues the column writer raises are important. We need to revisit and change the within 100 miles of the border permission given to border patrol and ICE agents. Reply Facebook Reply willowsandweeds Share on Facebook Follow the link “subject to fewer constitutional rights” | Pick 14 Feb 2019 23:32 Facebook Share Reply Report Reply “There will never be a consensus on this issue as long as one side doesn’t beleive it to be a crime at all.” And who is that? Please, link to a respectable source quoting nationally known leader advocating for open borders? Pro tip; Just because they say something on FOX News, doesn’t mean it’s true. Share Reply Facebook 14 Feb 2019 23:54 Facebook MoonlightTiger Share on Twitter | Pick Share on Facebook | Pick 4 5 5 6 The US should at least find enough money to wall up Trump for good. Can´t be that difficult. Share on Facebook | Pick 8 9 Share on Facebook I disagree. They will do some serious virtue signaling! Do you always tell lies or just when you comment at the Guardian? Joe Soap 8 9 Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Facebook American citizens would be protected. Non American citizens wouldn’t be. | Pick ButtChocolate 14 Feb 2019 23:58 Share 7evenPoint Show 10 more replies | Pick | Pick Facebook Facebook Steenkensan Share on Facebook Twitter 77 78 …for the BENEFIT of its citizens… We wonder how that can be explained. Twitter 3 4 He said, in 187 characters. 3 4 unthreaded MoonlightTiger | Pick I still don’t quite understand leftists’ total aversion to border control. The wall will not prevent legal migrants from flying in or crossing the border at checkpoints; it’s there to stop illegal migrants who do not have the legal right to work or live in the country. I live in London, if I wanted to move to the US I’d have to fill in loads of forms and would likely need a job awaiting me when I arrived – surely the same rules should apply to everyone? Twitter 16 17 15 Feb 2019 0:05 Middlengland | Pick Facebook Facebook Share on Facebook Facebook 30 31 Show 7 more replies Show 6 more replies Seems you have it all figured out, BLAME everyone except yourself! Except your concept has already been implemented by Donald Trump. Just let that sink in, if you’re capable! Show 3 more replies Joe Soap Share on Twitter It’s not “taking in the third world” through the Mexican border. 15 Feb 2019 0:38 Reply Share on Facebook Reply Show 1 more reply | Pick Facebook | Pick 15 Feb 2019 0:07 vijgos William Anthony 15 Feb 2019 1:08 Middlengland spotthelemon 5nufk1n4prez 8 9 Reply | Pick | Pick Twitter 4 5 | Pick Share | Pick Report | Pick The wall is idiotic and foolish, but so is a lack of security. I’m all for policing the border, but not this mass incarceration or surveillance database building. Its a slippery slope from simply ‘documenting’ immigration at the borders to surveilling sovereign citizens throughout the country. All for our ‘safety’. 0 1 Share on Twitter Reply Twitter Report | Pick Smart wall? Is no wall. America needs money for infrastructure, that should be a priority. There are a lot of Central American people suffering in border towns. Why not fast track them for work visas? Farmers need laborers and there are a lot of jobs Americans do not want to do. Why not give them work in America that otherwise nobody would take? These poor people should be put up in a Trump Hotel, until their work visas are ready. Facebook 15 Feb 2019 0:08 Share on Messenger | Pick Share Report Share Why not fast track them for work visas? Why in particular should these people be selected for fast tracking? 14 Feb 2019 23:44 14 Feb 2019 23:59 lightchaser | Pick William Anthony Report Reprobus Marmaritarum Twitter charlieblue 14 Feb 2019 23:13 Share on Twitter Report Reply Share on Twitter 14 Feb 2019 23:57 US immigration Facebook Twitter Twitter Share on Facebook Reply willowsandweeds | Pick PaniscusTroglodytes Share on Twitter “Such a wall will amass profits for military companies like Raytheon, tech firms like Amazon, and private prison makers like Geo Group, but do nothing to solve the humanitarian crisis at our southern border.” And this spending is a bad thing? The entire computer breakthrough and consequently all these smart phones today came from the NASA billions to go to the moon – the miniaturizing and chips R&D cane from those government billions…. This is why USA holds all the leading edge, and patents – targeted gov spending. This will keep USA in the forefront on R&D, the spin offs will be amazing. Also Jobs and profit for the American company – and the silly writer calls this Bad? Her second bit ” but do nothing to solve the humanitarian crisis at our southern border.” The two are not related – the wall is like locking your door when out – it is security, any humanitarian crisis, that is an entirely removed from the wall issue. Reply Facebook | Pick Reply Report Last modified on Thu 14 Feb 2019 18.34 EST lightchaser 14 Feb 2019 23:55 15 Feb 2019 0:36 pshelleyg 6 7 Report You seem to be advocating for a return to segregation? Facebook Share Share on Twitter 1 Facebook Facebook Facebook Show 10 more replies ‘The heart of the issue is that some people believe the US has no right to build a wall’ “The heart of the issue is that some people don’t think like I do” Report 14 Feb 2019 23:51 15 Feb 2019 0:17 Report Facebook 15 Feb 2019 0:53 Share on Facebook Share Twitter Report Reprobus Marmaritarum @marisa_franco nevesone It costs as much as a wall, and is needed as little as a wall. It’s a ‘compromise’ that gives away 99%. Reply 11 12 Share on Twitter 14 Feb 2019 23:23 Report 15 Feb 2019 0:22 Twitter Share on Twitter William Anthony Share on Twitter 15 Feb 2019 0:07 2 3 Reply 14 Feb 2019 23:52 Report Reply Facebook Share on Twitter Twitter | Pick Report 7evenPoint shutthefuckupdonny Report Facebook Reply Twitter The first graffiti to go on the wall should be:”Trumpsychosis””Mayllucinations””Mr. Gorbachev, tear down that wall”. 14 Feb 2019 23:38 5nufk1n4prez William Anthony 29 30 | Pick Share SirJoshuaReynolds Share This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. The privacy implications are vast: the mass collection of person data – of both citizens and non-citizens alike – and the widespread use of artificial intelligence technologies like facial recognition to analyze them for border agents. Such technologies have known issues with bias, particularly against people of color, and these issues will be amplified as information gleaned from border patrol is shared with law enforcement agencies across the country, as is already current practice.Taken in tandem with the administration’s antagonism to asylum, such policies serve only to disincentivize immigration and asylum-seeking generally, by increasing the dangers of border crossings. Let’s be clear: tightening the noose around the border means more migrants will die as they seek out crossings that are more dangerous but out of sight of border patrol.This does nothing to address the root causes of migration. It punishes the most vulnerable among us – migrants who have taken the drastic step of leaving their home for a better shot elsewhere – by enmeshing them in an efficient government surveillance net that could follow them in law enforcement agencies across the country and around the world.The beneficiaries of this proposal, however, are very clear: companies like Raytheon, which builds drones for the military; Amazon, which is currently shopping facial recognition technology to Immigration and Customs Enforcement and which also provides cloud storage to dozens of government agencies; and Palantir, the provider of software to Ice that allows its agents to track and build profiles of undocumented migrants throughout the country. America has a net loss of “illegal” immigrants crossing the border (more are going the other way and less are going in). Immigrants, legal or “illegal” are more law abiding than non-immigrants with far lower arrest rates. The idea that gangs of Mexicans are crossing the border en masse, raping and pillaging as they go, is a complete myth being peddled to scaremonger otherwise decent people into taking morally abhorrent positions to propel vile and greedy lunatics into undeserved positions of power. There’s nothing “woke” about being a decent human being who is able to do a basic google search to find the facts, not the myths. This is why progressives fight establishment Democrats with such ferocity; corporate Dems constantly give in to GOP demands, allowing the GOP to go crazier and get more abhorrent in their positions because they know Dems will give in. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2018/06/21/theres-no-immigration-crisis-and-these-charts-prove-it/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.39256c700117 3 4 This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. Aaah Gorby, how far have we fallen since then… Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Twitter ButtChocolate Share 1 2 JonPurrtree Report | Pick comments (531)Sign in or create your Guardian account to join the discussion. Twitter The tech ‘solutions’ Democrats are proposing to secure the US border would enrich tech and military contractors while violating our civil rights Facebook The problem with the wall, whether you build it out of concrete or have drones and border control, is that those in opposition to it simply do not agree with any form of immigration control at all. Hypothetically, if border patrol came up with a magic way of stopping those without a valid visa from getting over the border, and started hiring wizards, would the author here be happy for it? I don’t think so, the author will still repeat the mantra that migrants will try to enter through more dangerous ways, where there are no wizards. There will never be a consensus on this issue as long as one side doesn’t beleive it to be a crime at all. Share Share Report Share on Twitter 51 52 shutthefuckupdonny | Pick Report I think that if the republicans want a wall, THEY should pay for it all by themselves. There are about 50 million republicans and if each one is surcharged 100USD, Trump can get his wall. Don’t use my hard-earned money for this foolishness. Republicans need to man-up and “put their money where their mouth is.” Reply ghstwrtrx7 Jeffery Cash Weigand Report Zepp Twitter Twitter These companies stand to make millions. Just last week, we saw a report that tech firms are lining up to bid on contracts for beefed-up border enforcement. Silicon Valley will circle around these billions like sharks smelling blood.The proposal is not uncontested, however. Ayanna Pressley, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Rashida Tlaib, and Ilhan Omar drafted a letter to their colleagues urging “not another dollar” to the homeland security department until reforms are made, citing migrant children detention centers like Tornillo and “an agenda driven by hate”. They have been consistent in their demands that the Democrats not increase funding for DHS.Given the willingness of the majority of Democrats to support more physical barriers and more border patrol agents, it’s likely they will steamroll their colleagues’ opposition and approve a budget that includes increased funding for a tech wall.This would be a mistake. A wall made of drones and cameras would be just as wrong as one made of concrete. The real emergency along the southern border is comprised of the abhorrent conditions that migrants, refugees, and asylum seekers are forced to suffer. The answer cannot be to violate human and civil rights and line corporate coffers.Marisa Franco is based in Phoenix, and is a co-founder of Mijente, a national Latinx organizing and movement building network that has been leading the #NoTechforICE campaign 15 Feb 2019 0:14 Twitter William Anthony Reply Share on LinkedIn charlieblue Share on Facebook Share on Twitter William Anthony ADX Florence has far more appropriate accommodations. Twitter Show 1 more reply Facebook Share on Twitter Twitter The US is the next USSR. Inevitable. Share 14 Feb 2019 23:40 Joe Soap 42 43 This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. Facebook Jeffery Cash Weigand Reply Why not fast track them for work visas? Farmers need laborers and there are a lot of jobs Americans do not want to do. Why not give them work in America that otherwise nobody would take? Simple, because they won’t stay in farm employment. Do you have any idea how many people are here illegally by virtue of overstaying their visas? A good number to consider is that half of all people here illegally fell to that status by overstaying their visa. Last year, over 700,000 people overstayed, and all but 15% are still here. If you overstay your visa by 6 months you are barred from entering the country for 3 years. If you overstay by a year, you are barred from entering the country again for a decade. Twitter Report 0 1 15 Feb 2019 0:04 | Pick 3 4 Share on Facebook Report Facebook This crap has become tiresome. Can’t wait for the next gen to erase all.of it. Show 2 more replies William Anthony Share on Twitter Twitter | Pick Report Opinion Twitter Twitter | Pick Report You are spot on lightchaser. Democrats need voters. Anyone trying to tell you otherwise is misinformed or watches too much cnn, msnbc, or the countless other liberal bias. Reply Reply | Pick The Democrats are just giving lip service to this issue. They don’t a wall, any type of wall, because walls work. ICE and border patrol personal show data how erecting walls have cut down on illegal crossings. Nancy Pelosi who says “Wall are immoral” has a wall around her property. The pope who trash talked Trump for wanting a wall lives in the Vatican which has a wall surrounding it. The Democrats are trying to change the demographics of the US in order to establish a large underclass of future dependent voters. That’s why they don’t want a wall and they don’t want any enforcement of existing immigration laws. Since they can’t win over enough American citizens with their policies this is their plan to expand their voting base and to make America a one party nations. Share on Twitter 14 Feb 2019 23:56 | Pick lightchaser Share lij lamja | Pick Report Share The subheading for this article says its “violating our civil rights.” And how is that exactly? Share Reply Show 6 more replies Report Reason (optional) Share on Facebook Twitter Share on Twitter Twitter Twitter KMdude Twitter | Pick 14 Feb 2019 23:57 Twitter Report Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Facebook Will the Republicans be able to opt out of funding things they don’t like too? Turnabout would be fair play, surely? Share on Twitter 1 Facebook Facebook 100 shutthefuckupdonny Share | Pick Facebook Reply Share on Facebook Not saying it was ok when Obama did it. This is not a partisan issue for me. Facebook Share on Twitter Its all about the wall and Humpty Dumpty taking a big fall, on both sides of the Atlantic.We could of course not fall off the cliff/wall as an option but some are on a thanatos automatic pilot.These people shouldnt be allowed to affect policy given reason has left their pidgeon coops many moons ago. This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. Twitter ButtChocolate Twitter 28 29 Facebook Reply Reply | Pick Share on Facebook popgoesthepop Share on Facebook Report Report Share on Twitter 2 14 Feb 2019 23:55 6 7 Share | Pick 50 Tsk, tsk. Attacking the messenger. Another tiresome thing that will be buried with the boomers… Report Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Report Share on Facebook 5 6 Report Share on Facebook | Pick US politics Share Share on Facebook Share via Email Facebook shutthefuckupdonny 14 Feb 2019 23:56 Report Report dave6723 5nufk1n4prez 15 Feb 2019 0:14 Doing something to stop illegal immigration is probably something a majority of Americans support. Thus democrats are unlikely to go super woke on the border issue in anything but twitter-ready rhetoric. The problem with the wall, whether you build it out of concrete or have drones and border control, is that those in opposition to it simply do not agree with any form of immigration control at all. Sorry there was an error. Please try again later. If the problem persists, please contact Userhelp Reply Report MightyBuccaneer Facebook Reply Twitter Report spotthelemon Share on Facebook “Another tiresome thing that will be buried with the boomers…”So you think that the “boomers” invented the ad hominem, eh? [Hint: They didn’t.] But to return to your message: What data inspire your confidence that the next generation will do anything except inherit a contentious problem that has enough moving parts to defy simple solution? Facebook 5nufk1n4prez Facebook | Pick Twitter Share on Facebook 14 Feb 2019 23:55 highlandpiper 15 Feb 2019 0:22 | Pick 9 10 Share on Twitter Reply Share Reply Facebook Twitter | Pick Share on Facebook Share on Twitter | Pick Twitter 2 3 charlieblue Steenkensan Reply 15 Feb 2019 1:57 Share on Twitter Facebook Share on Twitter | Pick Zepp Facebook 15 Feb 2019 0:09 charlieblue KMdude | Pick Zepp Twitter Share on Twitter Share Share on Facebook Share 7 8 48 49 Facebook | Pick PhilosophicalSquid Share 1 2 Facebook Why do you need to keep immigrants out of schools and public bathrooms? What are you actually afraid of? Reply Twitter Share Share Show 5 more replies 14 Feb 2019 23:56 That is the scare story though that these dumb Leave voters voted on.Do not pretend that this is not true. Twitter Either one big wall… or many, many others from gentrified estates to schools, to public bathrooms will be raised instead. The west cannot take in the third world, or it will become the third world. Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Share Share on Facebook Report charlieblue Report Facebook Share | Pick “I still don’t quite understand leftists’ total aversion to border control.” Of course you don’t, because it doesn’t exist. This article strongly opposes spending for border security, but it’s an argument against the money Democratic politicians are willing to spend on border control. The author of this piece is a member of a very small minority. Opposing Fat Donny’s stupid wall is not advocating for open borders. Anybody with an iota of common sense understands that building a wall through 1000 miles of desert is a wildly ineffective solution for the problem of border security. There’s a wall in San Diego, and it has one of the highest populations of illegal immigrants in the country, as well a serious drug problem. The simple truth is that the great majority of “illegal immigrants” in the US come into the country on valid student, work and tourist visas, then simply overstay the terms of that visa. What would a wall do to stop that? Show 15 more replies Share William Anthony Reply Reply Share on Facebook Reply Reply | Pick Share | Pick Twitter Share on Facebook Report … Share on Twitter 7 8 Share lij lamja PaniscusTroglodytes Reply Close report comment form Share on Facebook William Anthony 142 143 Report Share on Twitter View more commentslast_img read more

Newt Gingrich resists irrelevance with new novel ripped from headlines

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first_imgNewt Gingrich Share on Messenger US politics Sat 18 May 2019 01.00 EDT Last modified on Sat 18 May 2019 01.47 EDT Newt Gingrich Share on Facebook Facebook Topics Facebook What Democrats can learn from Newt Gingrich, the man who broke politics Newt Gingrich really wanted to talk about feathered dinosaurs.“Thirty years ago, nobody believed dinosaurs and birds were the same,” he told an unwitting audience. “Today, virtually every paleontologist believes that birds came from dinosaurs and that the dinosaurs were feathered. But the American Museum [of Natural History] now has them so you can actually walk in and you see it, and it really is different than describing it.” Share on Twitter I don’t think there is a public political figure in America that could do what he’s doneAndrew Ferguson Samuel G Freedman Share on LinkedIn Shares1717 Share on Pinterest features Andrew Ferguson, an author and staff writer for the Atlantic, said: “I don’t think there is a public political figure in America that could do what he’s done. That whole body of work, as shoddy and speculative and in some cases silly as it is, shows a level of intellectual curiosity and energy that no one in my lifetime who’s involved in politics could ever match. It’s an absolutely astounding thing that he should get credit for. It’s just unheard of.“On the other hand, this stuff is usually done very quickly in a kind of assembly line fashion. But partly that just means the work is a victim of his own limitless energy and attention deficit disorder that has characterised his entire political life. He’s just always jumping around constantly. He absorbs information, then he does his own gloss on it and then he regurgitates it and it often doesn’t come out in the most appetising way.” Newt Gingrich appears on Good Day New York to promote his book Understanding Trump on 14 June 2017. Photograph: Startraks Photo/REX/Shutterstock Share on Facebook Newt Gingrich resists irrelevance with new novel ripped from headlinescenter_img Share via Email Pinterest … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Pinterest Twitter Callista and Newt Gingrich in Villepinte, France, on 22 June 2013. Photograph: Jacques Demarthon/AFP/Getty Images Since you’re here… Support The Guardian Gingrich went on to wax lyrical about seeing a “little baby” Tyrannosaurus rex. It was all a welcome plug for the museum in New York but it was a little bewildering for those who had gathered at the Heritage Foundation, one of Washington’s leading conservative thinktanks, to hear him talk about his new novel and its tantalising title: Collusion.Now 75, Gingrich is still resisting extinction. He is remembered as the architect of the Contract with America, proposals that in 1994 helped Republicans win a majority in the House of Representatives for the first time in 40 years. Gingrich was speaker from 1995 to 1999, the nemesis of Bill Clinton and father of political polarisation. He was a failed candidate for president in 2012 and is now a Fox News contributor and defender, interpreter and normaliser of Donald Trump“The Man Who Broke Politics” was the headline of a profile in the Atlantic magazine last year. It explained neatly: “Newt Gingrich turned partisan battles into bloodsport, wrecked Congress, and paved the way for Trump’s rise. Now he’s reveling in his achievements.”Yet where some politicians lack a hinterland, Gingrich’s is planet-sized. Along with his passion for paleontology, he is a former professor of history, environmental studies and geography. He is also a documentary maker, podcaster (recent subjects include Julius Caesar and Benjamin Franklin) and the author of 36 books including historical novels, tomes on public policy and a hagiographic Trump trilogy: Trump’s America, Understanding Trump and Electing Trump. According to those who know him, Gingrich, whose wife, Callista, is US ambassador to the Vatican, has an intellect and erudition that should not be underestimated. Rich Galen, his former press secretary and communications director, said: “The books I’ve read are pretty good. People forget he’s got a PhD in history so he’s good at doing research. He sells a lot, makes a ton of money, and deservedly so: they’re fun to read.”Gingrich is a speed reader who can finish a book in an afternoon, Galen said, and his speeches were laced with quotations thanks to an extraordinary memory. On one occasion, Galen said, he questioned how Gingrich could have remembered the exact page number of a particular line. The book was duly ordered from the Library of Congress and Gingrich was proved right.“How long do you want to play this game?” he asked.Others in Washington are more sceptical. Sidney Blumenthal, a political historian and former assistant and senior adviser to Clinton, said: “I am afraid I have not wasted my limited time on Earth on Newt Gingrich’s oeuvre. Life is short, art is long, Gingrich doesn’t fit.” Share on Twitter ‘I don’t think there is a public political figure in America that could do what he’s done,’ Andrew Ferguson, a staff writer for the Atlantic, said of Gingrich.Photograph: Michael Reynolds/EPA @smithinamerica The politician (and ex-professor, podcaster and Trump interpreter), says the release of Collusion, featuring a resurgent Russian menace, is ‘totally coincidental’ Twitter Share via Email David Smith in Washington Share on WhatsApp Read more Gingrich described Collusion, co-written with the former Washington Post reporter Peter Earley over 339 pages, as “very exciting” and “a page-turner”.It is certainly ripped from the headlines, featuring a resurgent Russian menace – the book is dedicated to “the poison victims and others who have been murdered by Russian president Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin’s regime” – divisive domestic politics and a former Navy Seal who is an opioid addict. But any reader hoping that the title is aimed at a certain American president is in for a disappointment.“The timing, by the way, of Collusion and the Mueller report is totally coincidental,” said Gingrich as he brandished a copy at the Heritage Foundation lectern. “We had scheduled this eight months ago. Once in a while you get lucky, although it does lead to some confusion: several people have introduced me on radio shows going: ‘And now, the brand new book about the Mueller report.’ Those people had not actually looked at the book.”‘Absolutely brilliant!’Contacts between the Trump campaign and Russia, as detailed by special counsel Robert Mueller, are of less concern to the authors then Antifa and other Fox foes. In one scene, a university professor is assailed by a leftwing mob and voices conservative talking points: “Now being a liberal is all about identity politics. It’s about focusing on our differences instead of what makes us the same.“Being color-blind is considered racist now! It’s all been flipped upside down, and it’s tearing us apart. Just look at us! … Today’s argument is that if you’re an LGBTQ black woman, your view of American society is automatically more valid than that of a straight white male. That is wrong. Logic and reason matter. Not victimization.”If Fox News gave out literary prizes, Gingrich would sweep the board. Collusion’s back cover has an endorsement from host Sean Hannity, also a Trump champion. Gingrich’s book Days of Infamy, an alternative history of the attack on Pearl Harbor, was praised as “absolutely brilliant!” by the Fox News personality Oliver North.But literary critics are likely to be less forgiving. At one point in Collusion, ex-Navy Seal Brett Garrett tells FBI agent Valerie Mayberry: “Listen, Mayberry. My 10 minutes is up, but I came to tell you that I’m going to get the bastard responsible and I want you to know something. Something I need to tell you. It’s not just the bureau that wants you back. We’re a good team, even if you do have a lot of really irritating habits. I’d like you back.”At the Heritage Foundation, one of the first audience questions was about a big-screen adaptation. Gingrich admitted: “None of our books have been picked up yet, but we’re very interested in anybody who’d like to talk to us. I’ve written a number of novels now that I think would easily either be a series on Netflix or would be a movie or whatever.”Is he bitter? Maybe a little. “But it’s interesting in Hollywood, if you make a really liberal film that doesn’t sell very well, you have greater prestige than if you make a bestselling conservative movie.” Reuse this contentlast_img read more

Apollo 11 tapes bought for 218 may sell for millions after nearly

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first_imgApollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin standing by the US flag planted on the surface of the moon on 20 July 1969.Photograph: Neil Armstrong/Nasa handout/EPA Reuse this content Tapes identified in 2008 as the only surviving original recording of the first moon landing in 1969 are to go up for auction in July Share on Facebook New York Share on LinkedIn Miranda Bryant in New York and agency Apollo 11 5 out of 5 stars. Share on Twitter Space When Gary George bought a truckload of videotapes for $218 from a US government surplus auction more than 40 years ago, he planned to sell them to television stations – to record over.Fortunately, he decided to hold on to the three tapes labelled “Apollo 11 EVA”, which have since been identified as the only surviving original recording of the first moon landing, in 1969. Apollo 11 review – stunning return to an incredible journey Share via Email Share via Email Read more Since you’re here… … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Fri 28 Jun 2019 11.50 EDT Topics Apollo 11 Share on WhatsApp news Now the tapes – which include Neil Armstrong’s famous words “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind” – are to go on sale in July at Sotheby’s in New York, where they are expected to fetch as much as $2m.The collection also includes footage of Buzz Aldrin walking in minimal lunar gravity, planting the US flag on the moon, collecting samples. It also shows the crew’s call with Richard Nixon.George, now 65, was astonished. “I had no idea there was anything of value on them,” the retired mechanical engineer from Las Vegas told Reuters. “I was selling them to TV stations just to record over.”George thinks he sold eight reels to television stations for $50 each. It was his father who spotted the three Nasa labelled reels.“He was really into the space program and he said, ‘I think I’d hang on to those. They might be valuable someday. So, for that very reason, I pulled them out and hauled them around the country for the next 43 years. That’s how come they survived.”In 2006, Nasa admitted that they could not find the original video recordings of the landing. It was not until two years later, when George was on holiday with a friend who worked at Nasa, that he found out they were looking for them.“Quite frankly, I was sitting at the table drinking a beer and I said, ‘Well, damn, I have those,’” said George.He did not have the equipment to watch the tapes, but after he started speaking to Nasa about handing them over he was able to see the footage for the first time in a special studio in California. Apollo 11 tapes bought for $218 may sell for millions after nearly being lost Share on Messenger Share on Twitter Support The Guardian Share on Pinterest Shares747747 Share on Facebook The moon Last modified on Fri 28 Jun 2019 12.07 EDTlast_img read more

Activist arrested for giving migrants food and shelter faces retrial

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first_img Support The Guardian Activist arrested for giving migrants food and shelter faces retrial Share on Twitter Read more news First published on Tue 2 Jul 2019 14.50 EDT The Resistance Now: Sign up for weekly news updates about the movement Activism Share on Messenger Topics Since you’re here… … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Share on WhatsApp Share on Twitter Scott Warren, who was accused of aiding migrants, will be retried after a jury last month was unable to reach a verdict at his trial Share via Email Reuse this contentcenter_img US prosecutors announced in court that they would retry a border activist accused of aiding migrants, after a jury last month was unable to reach a verdict at his trial in Arizona.The government dropped a conspiracy charge and will retry the defendant, Scott Warren, on 12 November on two counts of harboring migrants, said Glenn McCormick, a spokesman for the US attorney’s office.Warren, a 36-year-old college geography instructor who works with the Arizona-based humanitarian group No More Deaths, was arrested in January 2018 on suspicion of supplying food, water and clean clothes to two undocumented migrants. He was initially charged with conspiracy to transport and harbor migrants and faced up to 20 years in prison. Arizona Arizona Share on Facebook US-Mexico border Share on Pinterest Shares1,1821182 Guardian staff and agencies US immigration During the trial in June, defense attorneys argued Warren was just being kind by giving water, food and lodging to the migrants.Prosecutors maintained the men were not in distress and Warren helped them at a property used for aiding migrants near the Mexico border.Warren is one of nine members of No More Deaths who have been charged with crimes related to their work, but he is the only one to have faced felony charges.The charges against the volunteers came a week after No More Deaths published a report accusing border patrol agents of condemning migrants to death by sabotaging water containers and other supplies. It also accused agents of harassing volunteers in the field. Border patrol denies the charges.Warren’s supporters cheered him outside the federal courthouse on Tuesday after prosecutors announced their decision. Warren thanked them and said his case had raised the public’s consciousness.He also said his trial had led to “more volunteers who want to stand in solidarity with migrants, local residents stiffened in their resistance to border walls and the militarization of our communities, and a flood of water into the desert at a time when it is most needed”.Humanitarian groups say they face increasing scrutiny under Donald Trump’s hardline immigration policies.“The federal government shouldn’t have arrested Scott Warren in the first place,” said the Rev Mary Katherine Morn, president and CEO of Unitarian Universalist Service Committee.The retrial “highlights just how far the Trump administration is willing to go to punish migrants and those who provide them with life-saving assistance”, she added. Share via Email Share on LinkedIn Scott Warren speaks outside federal court in Tucson, Arizona, on 11 June 2019.Photograph: Astrid Galvan/AP Share on Facebook Tue 2 Jul 2019 17.04 EDTlast_img read more

See and hear CapTel phones let you see what you cant hear

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first_imgIdeal for those who are hard of hearing or deaf, CapTel phones caption what the caller is saying. The phones work just like any other phone, only they have a display attached to them that reads what the caller says.CapTel phone users can listen to the caller, and can also read the written captions in the CapTel’s bright display window.How it Works“You dial the other person’s number, exactly the same way as with any other telephone. While you dial, the CapTel phone automatically connects to the captioning service. When the other party answers, you hear everything they say, just like a traditional call. At the same time, the captioning service transcribes everything they say into captions, which appear on the CapTel display window. You hear what you can, and read what you need to.” – captel.comChoosing a PhoneCapTel 840iThis phone is for users who have access to high-speed internet and telephone service.•Captions can be turned on/off as needed•Built in Answering Machine•Extra large display screen•Adjustable font sizes and colors including extra large font option•Phone book stores frequently called numbers (95+ names)•WiFi compatibleCapTel 800This phone is for users who have standard analog phone lines.•Captions are provided by a free service that connects to the call.•Calls you make are automatically connected to the Captioning Service to provide captions.•Incoming callers dial the service first, then enter your phone number in order for you to get captions.*•Adjustable font sizes and colors•Phone book to store frequently called numbers (95+ names)•Easy access to voice mail and answering machine messages.•Works just like a standard phone for people who do not need captions.In many states, CapTel equipment is provided free or at a reduced rate to people with hearing loss. So the price for a CapTel Phone may vary from state to state. Check the specifics of Indiana, or your state, here. There is no cost for using the CapTel captioning service, it is provided free as part of your state’s relay service. Learn more about how to find a CapTel equipment dealer here.Share this…TwitterFacebookPinterestLinkedInEmailPrint RelatedCommunication Made Easy with Panasonic’s Cordless PhoneMarch 7, 2019In “Communication”ATFAQ101 – Q1- Taking classroom attendance with a visual impairment , Q2 – Live captions, Q3 – Visual voicemails, Q4 – Remote signaling devices Q5 – Wildcard question: digital versus analog notetaking and planningJune 10, 2019In “Assistive Technology FAQ (ATFAQ) Podcast”ATU132 – Holiday Shopping Special Episode – Part 2December 6, 2013In “Assistive Technology Update”last_img read more

ATU167 – Davide Bolchini Aural Interfaces NFB A11y training Paro Socially Assistive

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first_img——-transcript follows ——DAVIDE BOLCHINI:  Hi, this is Davide Bolchini, and I’m an Associate Professor of Human Centered Computing and Department chair in the School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University, Purdue University in Indianapolis, and this is your Assistive Technology Update.WADE WINGLER:  Hi, this is Wade Wingler with the INDATA Project at Easter Seals Crossroads in Indiana with your Assistive Technology Update, a weekly dose of information that keeps you up-to-date on the latest developments in the field of technology, designed to assist people with disabilities and special needs.  Welcome to episode number 167 of Assistive Technology Update.  It’s scheduled to be released on August 8 of 2014.My guest today is Dr. Davide Bolchini from the IU School of Informatics here in Indianapolis.  We’re going to talk about a new audio web interface.We have a story from Forbes magazine about socially assistive robots, the NFB is doing a training on web accessibility, and we spend some time talking about Marco from Mozilla and his experiment with 30 days of android.We hope you’ll check out our website at www.eastersealstech.com, shoot us a note on Twitter at INDATA Project, or leave your question or comment on our listener line.  That number is 317-721-7124.I’ve mentioned it a few times here on the show before.  I’m always a sucker for a good robot story, but this one is a little bit different.  I’m looking at an article from the Mercury news talking about Paro, that’s a robot and is designed to help the elderly.  It was created by Japanese inventor and is part of a new class of socially assistive robots.  This one is being used in a Sunny View Retirement Community in Cupertino, California.  It’s used by elderly folks who have had strokes or other kinds of conditions.  It looks like a baby harp seal and is designed to give these folks somebody or something to take care of and to hang out with and have a social experience.There is some controversy related to this.  Some critics feel that people might become dependent on robots and technology as opposed to having social interaction; however, Professor Maja Matarick says that the alternatives for these people might be to stare at the floor or television for hours.  This is a better alternative.  Katie Hoffman is the director of activities there at Sunny View and she says that they also have a cat and a dog for visitors — or visitors sometimes bring their dogs, but one of the challenges with animals and sometimes they can pose safety issues or they can be messy.  She also talks about the fact that they have been able to use Paro the robot in place of medication sometimes.They have some interesting feedback here from some of the residents that talk about how some folks have cradled or kissed or cuddled the creature but then they talk about a guy who is 92 years old and wasn’t so excited about it.  He said, “What shall I say to you?”  to the robot.  He handed it back and said, “Here, you can have it.”  He wasn’t so excited about it.I think this is an interesting topic to talk about social robots and robust are going to help people with social needs and social behaviors.  Professor Matarick said, “We need to think about the humane and ethical use of technology because these things are coming.”  It’s kind of a long article.  Has a lot of interesting photographs.  I would encourage you to check it out.  I’ll pop a link in the show notes and you can learn more about Paro, the robot designed to help the elderly.I’m looking at a headline here from Forbes magazine.  It reads, “Using technology to mitigate cognitive disabilities.”  The article starts off talking about the fact that in 2013, the Department of Labor established a baseline of 7% of their contracted labor force to include people with disabilities.  Of course, that’s going to mean folks with intellectual and cognitive disabilities as well.  In fact, the article goes on to say that up to 25% of the workforce may be experiencing some kind of cognitive issue at any given time.  They quote an article expert here named Madeleine Seko who talks about some of the technologies that might be available to help.  Some of the things she mentions includes My Bionic Brain, a technology for the iPad from cognitive harmonics.  It’s a personal life management tool to help folks with cognitive disabilities deal with personal organization and productivity.  PEAT by Brain Aid is another PDA-based system helping people with executive functions.  BioZen is a technology from the national Center for telehealth and technology.  It’s a smartphone app and is designed to assist servicemembers with PTSD and brain injury.  And then something I’m familiar with which is Livescribe.  It’s a digital pen that allows you to record the audio in the room as well as take handwritten notes and have them played back for you in a pretty cool way.  I love it when mention publications like Forbes gives a nod to our industry, so I’m going to pop a link in the show notes and you can see what Forbes is talking about in terms of using technology to mitigate cognitive disabilities.  Check our show notes.Are you in the Washington, DC area and are you interested in how people with disabilities and people who use assistive technology access the web?  Well, the National Federation for the Blind is going to have a training on September 9 in Baltimore, Maryland.  It’s all about web accessibility.  It’s a full day event and in the morning they’re going to have presenters from the Department of Justice, from Deque, from Humana, from California State University and George Mason University, talking about the importance of website accessibility.  In the afternoon, they’re going to have sessions on policy that will include people from the Department of Homeland Security, the Maryland State Board of elections, and US Access Board.  Then technical sessions from Actuate and Deque and Google talking about how you can make your web content more accessible to people who use assistive technology.  There’s a cost to participate.  It’s $80, but I’ll stick a link in the show notes over to the registration page where you can learn all about the training and whether or not you might participate.  It’s September 9 in Baltimore, Maryland, sponsored by the NFB.  Check our show notes.On more than one occasion, we’ve referenced Marco Zehe and his accessibility blog.  Marco is somebody who lives in Germany.  He’s blind, he’s a web accessibility activist, and he works at Mozilla.  He has decided to do a 30 days with android experiment.  He has been using iOS as his main mobile platform for about five years or so, and just here in the last couple of days he has handed his iPhone to his wife, asked her to confiscate it for him, and he is going to spend 30 days with android as somebody who is blind relying on it solely.  For this, he has created a special blog.  It’s 30dayswithandroid.blogspot.de and I’ll pop a link in the show notes where he’s going to give us updates on how this process is going.  He also decided to set up a Twitter hashtag for that, so #30dayswithandroid is the hashtag that he’s going to be using on Twitter to chronicle his experiment here with switching from iOS over to android.  I think that’s pretty cool and pretty interesting.  I’m also interested in learning more about android so interested in following Marco’s experiment.  I’m going to pop a link in the show notes that you can find the blog and you can also find the Twitter hashtag and you can check out what Marco is doing with android.  Check our show notes.Many of you know that I am an adjunct faculty member at a couple of schools and teach some courses on assistive technology.  One of them I’m just finishing up right now, and a student had a question for me that that was a pretty good one.  So I asked her to call and put it on our listener line so that we can address it here on our show.  Here’s the question from Esther.>>  Hi, I have a question regarding assistive technology that’s not working properly.  Is that something that you recommend going to a tech person at our school about, or should we contact Easter Seals, or is that something we should go to the company that we purchase the product from?  What are your recommendations for the cheapest and most effective work to be accomplished?WADE WINGLER:  I think that’s a question that probably happens on a fairly regular basis, especially for educators and others who don’t work with assistive technology all the time.  I kind of have a two-part answer here.  First, if you happen to know that there’s somebody in house, either the user of assistive technology or another educator or even an IT or AT person at the school, definitely asked them because you might find that that’s a faster way to get information about the problem.  If you’re having a problem with some assistive technology, it’s likely that somebody else has had that problem too.If that doesn’t work, definitely reach out to the manufacture or the distributor of the technology and ask them.  If you think about it, they are motivated to sell and support the technology so they’re going to know a ton about it and be able to answer most of the questions that come along.  I think both are good answers.  I think for me come out probably start with the local folks who I can get a hold of very quickly and then pretty quickly thereafter go to one of the manufacturers, especially if it’s a recently purchased product that might still be under warranty.You mentioned Easter Seals, our host organization.  There are certainly lots of assistive technology practitioners and specialists out there who might be able to help with those technical issues there.  That’s another pretty decent option.  There is oftentimes going to be a cost associated with that.  I would consider that a viable option but maybe after you’ve tried some new local folks in your school and then the manufacturer.  Thanks for your call.If other listeners have calls for our listener line, questions about technology or procedures or whatever you have, give us a call.  That number is 317-721-7124.  It’s a voicemail box that’s available 24 hours a day.  Leave your message there and you may show up on an upcoming episode of assistive technology update.I’m constantly fascinated by new technology.  I think the Internet is one of the most powerful tools in our generation if maybe even our lifetime.  I’m also excited when I get to meet people who have similar interests.  Not too long ago, a gentleman came through our doors named Dr. Davide Bolchini who you’re about to meet.  He is an associate professor at Indiana University, Purdue University in Indianapolis.  Here in central Indiana we call that IUPUI.  He also happens to be the chair of the department that’s called Human Centered Computing which is within the School of Informatics.  A lot of technical stuff going on there.  The reason I wanted Dr. Bolchini to spend some time with us today is he is interested in auditory or aural interfaces for the web and computing devices.  We’re going to jump into a pretty interesting topic here.  Before we do that, Dr. Bolchini, are you there?DAVIDE BOLCHINI:  Yes.  How are you?WADE WINGLER:  Good. Davide, thank you so much for taking time out of your morning.  I know you’ve got a lot of meeting going on today so I’m pleased and thankful that you took some time to talk with my audience a little bit.  I know we’re going to talk about some fairly technical stuff today, but before we jump into the technology side of it, can you tell me a little bit about yourself and how you became interested in technology for people with disabilities?DAVIDE BOLCHINI:  Yes.  Thanks for inviting me to the show.  I teach in a field called Human Computer Interaction here in the School of Informatics and Computing.  I do research in the area of accessibility, specifically interested in web accessibility and accessibility to web applications.I think the fascination to me for this field came probably around 14 years ago while I was working with my PC advisor in Switzerland, the University of Lugano.  We were working on a European funded research project.  Part of this project was to develop an accessible websites for the museum in Germany.  We looked at the accessibility of these websites.  Of course there was a lot of interesting work to do in terms of making the content accessible, making the overall site and graphics and content accessible.  So we started to apply the usual aspects of accessibility technologies including W3C guidelines for accessibility, the standards available.But then we quickly realized that there is so much work to do not just to making the website accessible but actually making it usable.  The metaphor we would use that I remember is you can have an accessible building when you can have an accessible ramp into the building, but if you have to go on this ramp for 50 floors high, it still technically really accessible but it’s hardly usable.  It’s very frustrating.  So we were still looking not just that the technical aspect of disability but how to make a website usable.  Those two things for us really going together.We started to work on that topic, and then when I came here with Indiana University, I had the opportunity to really jump into that area more deeply.  I started to work with the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired on novel ideas and novel research opportunity to improve accessibility to our web applications.WADE WINGLER:  So from Italy then Switzerland and now to Indiana, and working specifically with folks who are blind or visually impaired.  You’ve develop something that has a name that I hadn’t heard of before.  Tell me about the aural web.DAVIDE BOLCHINI:  Yes.  So when we look at the traditional user interfaces, we typically use a user interface that are visually-based, and that has been history.  But we realized that aural interfaces hold great promise for a number of opportunities.  Of course the basic opportunities were to support accessibility and navigation of a computer interface for people who are blind or visually impaired, but we realize that aural interfaces are also very useful for people who cannot look at the screen all the time because maybe their eyes are busy doing something else and maybe they are looking at the street, looking at the road about jogging or walking and they cannot look at their device all the time.  So there is an opportunity to explore what we call the navigation of the aural web, which is how does the web look like when the main means of communication with the web is the aural channel or the auditory channel.  So these abilities, one, channel of application, was an Arrow application for this, but there are also opportunities for sighted user who has their eyes busy in a given moment.WADE WINGLER:  And you mentioned about driving, while exercising.  My mind immediately jumps to maybe some medical applications, maybe a surgeon whose hands and eyes are busy at something is in its access to information.  Do you have other examples of potential applications?DAVIDE BOLCHINI:  Yes.  What we call the aural mobile Web, or mobile web browsing, there are more opportunities.  All the apps we often talk about, the mobile apps, are very interesting but they assume that users are focused constantly on the device.  So we are wondering, is your opportunity to basically decouple the visual attention from the device and use the auditory channel to really offload their eyes.  So a number of mobile applications that we talked about, there is an opportunity to transform them aurally and there are lots of challenges and making them appropriately audible.WADE WINGLER:  And one of the things that comes to mind to me when I think of that conceptually is that that may be a different way of absorbing information.  I have to assume that you’re looking at the brain science related to this as well as somebody moves from a mode of looking at information on the screen to absorbing information in an auditory format.  Is that part of the work that you’re doing?DAVIDE BOLCHINI:  Yes.  Part of the work is really understanding how we navigate the complex information architecture.  So how we can make sense of a complex information architecture aurally, what type of new design and structure to put in place to make aural navigation still usable and enjoyable to use.  This is definitely part of what we’re interested in.WADE WINGLER:  I get more and more fascinated the more I learn about this.  Describe to me, if you, will how this web interface is different than others.  I think I’m making the assumption that I look at any website and I’m using my hands on the keyboard and a mouse or trackpad to move content up-and-down.  I’m looking at headers and maybe sub headers with my eyes on the website.  But this is different.  Tell me how this is different from the user’s perspective.DAVIDE BOLCHINI:  So the aural web is a collection of several projects that we started exploring in the areas, not just one single interface, but we really explored a number of different types of interfaces in this area.So the first example I would give you is we looked at both web application and mobile applications and we looked at how they are currently structured.  So if you look at the typical web application, it could be structured as a hierarchy, so as a tree structure.  You go on a homepage.  From the homepage you go to a section.  From a section you go to a subsection, etc.  So you have a traditionally large information architecture which is hierarchically structured.  The way typically that you navigate with a keyboard or mouse as you mention is to go to page to page and you move forward.But imagine a 50% of our navigation is actually not forward the backwards.  So we often without our realizing it engage in back navigation.  Back navigation is fundamental in everything that we do to find a point in the website to reorient ourselves or to re-find information we didn’t think was important it while ago but now we want to find it again.  So re-finding information is a key activity in every navigation that we do.Currently, mobile applications or websites support back navigation in a very rudimentary way.  So I’ll make an example.  When you navigate a website, you can go back page by page very quickly with your eyes.  You can scan the pages to go back to it and then if it’s not the one you’re interested in you can go back and scan it again until you find the page that you are looking for.  Back, back, back.  Every website and mobile application tree, every single step of the back navigation as a page back.  It is similar if you in dialogue like this between me and you, if you ask me, “Davide, could you go back to where you talked about your experiences with some accessibility.”  What I would do if I was a current website, I would say, “Well, let’s rewind for example 30 seconds ago.  Is that what you’re looking for?”  No.  “Let’s rewind 60 seconds ago.  Is that what you’re looking for?”  And so on and so forth.  So the current structure of back navigation is very rudimentary.What we tried to really see how we can improve or fast-track or provide a shortcut to back navigation by providing the dialogue that I said, which is a very aural experience.  You can ask me, “Davide, could you go back to where you talked about your experience in accessibility in Switzerland.”  I’ll say yes and immediately jump to that with a semantic reference.  So with the specific point in that dialogue in the aural dialogue that we left off, you can resume.So we developed a number of prototypes that basically leverage this notion of topic or semantic reference.  Imagine as you navigate through a website, you can easily go back not just to the previous page but to the last book you visited or to the last author revisited or to the last product you visited.  So basically we started to reconceptualize what we can do in a website, not in terms of pages but in terms of topics.  Multiple pages can be classed around topics.  We can use the notion of topic to basically provide an aural back navigation.So we tested these ideas in two settings.  With the blind and visually impaired users we did an empirical evaluation at the Indiana School for the Blind, a controlled experiment.  We basically involved 10 blind or visually impaired users in navigating backward in a large website using the traditional back of the web browser and using this notion of topics.  What we discovered is that the topic navigation saved a significant number of steps during back navigation.  For example, those who use topics respectively completed their navigation task around 20% faster with respect to the traditional back.  So these are one example which we can basically speed up navigation while using an aural interface, in this case using a screen reader on an accessible website.WADE WINGLER:  That makes a lot of sense because if I think about web navigation, it’s a linear experience in terms of the navigation tools, but is not always a linear thought process.  That makes a ton of sense.  I know that you have many iterations of this concept working.  Tell me about the current implementation.  Is it a product yet?  Is it a technology that’s outside of testing yet?DAVIDE BOLCHINI:  So what we have is we’re pursuing a number of leads.  Firstly, we have a ready to use prototype application that we have available on our website.  If you Google Davide Bolchini, the first link is my professional webpage.  You can download not only aural publications on the topic of the aural web but also the source code of all the applications that we developed that demonstrate this concept as they work.  We also filed some patents with some of our PC students who are very interested in accessibility.  So we filed two provisional applications with the IURTC, which is the Indiana University Research and Technology Corporation.  One of these disclosures have been filed and is pending at the Department of commerce.So we’re very excited to make these opportunities available come up both as open-source software so people can download and also as ideas that other companies can use to improve their applications.WADE WINGLER:  So if you look into your crystal ball, if you look into the future, what does the aural interface and this technology you’re working on, what does it look like a few years down the road?DAVIDE BOLCHINI:  So I would envision a world in which every visual interface has an aural counterpart which is designed as appropriately and in as a usable way as the visual interfaces.  Having an appropriate aural interface will serve immediately the needs of all those who need to access an interactive system using their auditory senses in a variety of contexts, so blind and visually impaired but also people who are doing other tasks and cannot look at the screen all the time.WADE WINGLER:  Are you working on other projects that impact the lives of folks with disabilities?  This is an important one but do you have other projects that are assistive technology oriented?DAVIDE BOLCHINI:  Yes.  We have several projects.  I just give you one example.  This one that I describe is being funded by the National Science Foundation for the last four years.  Now we just received funding from Google who is very interested in providing tools and advanced web browsers for accessibility.  We are just finalizing a one year work on this Google project which basically deals not with the large navigation in a large context architecture but it deals with the navigation in a given page.So we’re trying to explore ways in which when you navigate a complex webpage like an Amazon aurally, you can basically access very quickly important sections of the page.  If you look at the Amazon webpage, you can basically scan through all the links, scan through all the headings, or the best thing you can do is to jump to the content.  But it’s very difficult to immediately access the reviews of the product.  Or when you’re in a shopping cart to immediately access the summary of the order.So we started to understand what the challengers were of blind and visually impaired users in navigating complex webpages especially in commerce sites and we try to understand what were the top most important sections of complex webpage types and how we can improve the speed of access to those important sections.  So this is a complementary project in the aural web navigation sphere.WADE WINGLER:  That is exciting stuff.  It sounds very interesting and I know that you and I could go on, and we have from time to time, on and on about these topics that are very interesting.  We’re out of time for the interview today.  Can you let people know how they might contact you or learn more about your work?  Is there a website address?  How would they reach you?DAVIDE BOLCHINI:  Yes. If you Google Davide Bolchini, the first link is my personal webpage.  You can access all our publications on accessibility, aural applications, and the description of current products we have on accessibility on the aural web.  Email is dbolchini@iupui.edu.WADE WINGLER:  Great.  Dr. Davide Bolchini is the chair of the Department of human Centered Computing at the Indiana University, Purdue University at Indianapolis School of Informatics.  Thank you so much for being with us.DAVIDE BOLCHINI:  Thank you, Wade.WADE WINGLER:  Do you have a question about assistive technology? Do you have a suggestion for someone we should interview on Assistive Technology Update? Call our listener line at 317-721-7124. Looking for show notes from today’s show? Head on over to EasterSealstech.com. Shoot us a note on Twitter @INDATAProject, or check us out on Facebook. That was your Assistance Technology Update. I’m Wade Wingler with the INDATA Project at Easter Seals Crossroads in Indiana. Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadYour weekly dose of information that keeps you up to date on the latest developments in the field of technology designed to assist people with disabilities and special needs.Show Notes:Davide Bolchini, PhD, Chair of Department of Human-Centered Computing at School of Informatics @ IUPUIdbolchin@iupui.edu | http://soic.iupui.edu/people/davide-bolchini/ | http://mypage.iu.edu/~dbolchin/Forbes: Using Technology To Mitigate Cognitive Disabilities http://buff.ly/1tWYMGfWeb Accessibility Day | National Federation of the Blind http://buff.ly/1sfV4n7Started a 30 days with Android experiment | Marco’s accessibility blog http://buff.ly/1tWTSJu——————————Listen 24/7 at www.AssistiveTechnologyRadio.comIf you have an AT question, leave us a voice mail at: 317-721-7124 or email tech@eastersealscrossroads.orgCheck out our web site: https://www.eastersealstech.comFollow us on Twitter: @INDATAprojectLike us on Facebook: www.Facebook.com/INDATA Share this…TwitterFacebookPinterestLinkedInEmailPrint RelatedATU256 – ATLAS Vantagepoint, Podcasts Now on Google Play, Google AT Grants Awarded, $400k ALS AT Challenge PrizesApril 22, 2016In “Assistive Technology Update”ATU228 – iOS 9 and Its Impact on People with Disabilities | Luis Perez | Free AT Webinars, Insulin and Blood Sugar Monitoring on Your Smart Phone, Robots and AutismOctober 9, 2015In “Assistive Technology Update”ATU188 – Wheel Life & The Bally Foundation, Look at Me app for Autism, Applevis’ Golden Apple Awards, Birdhouse for AutismJanuary 2, 2015In “Assistive Technology Update”last_img read more

4 Gift Ideas from VTech

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first_imgVisit the VTech website to check out more of their products!Share this…TwitterFacebookPinterestLinkedInEmailPrint Related8 Toys for Auditory Development–2015 Holiday gift guide for children with special needs: Part 1November 11, 2015In “Products and Devices”VTech Sit-to-Stand Learning WalkerOctober 10, 2017In “Toys”Toys to Encourage Language: 2016 Holiday Gift Guide for Children with Special Needs: Part 3December 7, 2016In “Communication” After writing about the KidiBuzz handheld smart device yesterday, I was curious about what else VTech has available.  And with the holiday season quickly approaching, I thought it’d be great to offer you some gift ideas for the little ones!VTech is “a world leader in age-appropriate and developmental stage-based electronic learning products for children.  As a pioneer in the learning toy category, VTech develops high-quality, innovative educational products that enrich children’s development and make learning fun.”4 Gift Ideas from VTech:1. Touch & Learn Activity Desk Deluxe:Ideal for ages 2 to 5 yearsThe Touch & Learn Activity Desk Deluxe from VTech is a 3-in-1 desk with interactive, expandable activity cards.  The desk features an interactive desktop and five pages to explore that cover letters, music, numbers, colors, and more.Features:Choose from eight expansion packs (sold separately) that focus on specific curriculum such as:Nursery rhymesAnimalsReading skillsNumbersAnd more SmartPoint technology makes Gavin respond to all SmartPoint locations with fun sounds, phrases, 3 sing-along songs and 6 melodiesRequires 3 AAA batteriesAutomatic shut-off to preserve battery life3. Kidi Super Star:Ideal for ages 4 to 10 yearsKidi Super Star by VTech allows children to take center stage.  They can grab the microphone to sing along to eight built-in songs with super cute animations or plug in an MP3 player.  When they’re ready, they can use Music Magic mode to remove or reduce the main vocal track and take the lead.Features:Colorful disco light effects create an exciting atmosphereMusic Magic mode allows children to remove or reduce the main vocal track and take the leadApplause and cheering sounds complete the performance4 funny vocal effects change the sound of their voice and let them express themselves in a fun wayBuilt-in recorder records up to 5 minutes so children can listen to their performanceHave fun with 6 music, rhythm, and memory games and sing along with popular tunes4. Kidizoom Action Cam 180:Ideal for ages 4 to 12 yearsThe Kidizoom Action Cam 180 allows children to take photos, selfies, and videos with slow and fast-motion.  The camera encourages creativity by allowing children to independently take pictures.Features:Takes photos and records video on the goTake selfies or shoot videos with exciting features like slow and fast-motion using the 180º rotatable cameraUse included accessories to mount the camera to bike, helmet, skateboard, and moreAdd all-weather, water-resistant case for use up to 6′ underwaterIncludes 2 platform-style games and one augmented reality game for even more funIncludes:Waterproof caseBicycle mountMounting attachment with adhesive flat mountMicro-USB cableWrist strapcenter_img Desk also transforms into an easel and chalkboard with plenty of storage space for art supplies to promote play and discoveryLED display illustrates letter and number stroke order and how to draw basic shapes100+ vocabulary words, 20+ activities and 20+ songs and melodiesFeatures a toy telephone and music playerComes with stool2. Go! Go!  Smart Wheels Race & Play Adventure Park:Ideal for ages 1 to 5 yearsChildren will have a blast going for a ride with Gavin the Go-Kart on the Go! Go! Smart Wheels Race & Play Adventure Park.  “Launch Gavin to the top of the playset with the catapult launcher and watch as he races down the track and goes around the 360º loop and off the jump ramp.”Features:Adventure Park includes:A Ferris wheel that spinsTumble-down carnival gameSwinging gate to strengthen motor skillsAnd much morelast_img read more

Comcast Technology Solutions Announces New Global Ad Management Solution that Unifies Linear

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first_imgComcast Technology Solutions Announces New Global Ad Management Solution that Unifies Linear and Digital Workflows PRNewswireMay 28, 2019, 6:18 pmMay 28, 2019 ad management solutionComcast TechnologyDemand-SideMarketing TechnologyNewsSupply-side platform Previous ArticleNativo’s Next Generation Ad Server and Monetization Platform Gains Wide Adoption with Premium PublishersNext ArticleLee Named Participant in Google News Initiative Data Lab Unveiling New Technology in a Suite of Services That Automates Media Workflows From Planning and Distribution to Talent Rights Management and Creative OptimizationComcast Technology Solutions, a division of Comcast Cable that serves advertisers, agencies and content providers on both the Demand-Side and Supply-Side of the business, announced the launch of a comprehensive global ad management solution that connects the media plan to the entire creative workflow. The solution includes a suite of services that saves advertisers and agencies time and money by automating the manual processes of matching creative to media buys, managing traffic and delivery, creative versioning, and reporting across all channels. The ad management solution offers both linear and non-linear distribution and integrates talent rights management, while the company’s collaboration with Peach allows for ads to be delivered internationally.The new ad management solution from Comcast Technology Solutions enables brands to reach the audiences they are targeting on any device, ensuring broadcast-quality ads are delivered to all channels. The media agnostic platform integrates into any Demand-Side and Supply-Side platform across geographies worldwide. In addition, it offers real-time, automated processes to help advertisers and programmers quickly optimize new monetization opportunities within digital and linear advertising.Marketing Technology News: Vonage Wins 2019 INTERNET TELEPHONY Product of the Year Awards“We understand first-hand the challenges of managing campaigns across an increasingly complex, fragmented ecosystem. Our new ad management solution transforms and automates the entire workflow, making it easier than ever before to manage, execute and optimize campaigns across all digital and linear destinations,” said Richard Nunn, Vice President and General Manager at Comcast Technology Solutions. “We are constantly reimagining how we can improve efficiency and reinvent processes. Our ad management solution is the result of this continuous innovation.”Marketing Technology News: Cint Appoints SVP of Asia Nicholas Antram to Continue Strategic Expansion Across the RegionThrough the new collaboration with Peach, an established global video advertising distribution player, the solution will be available outside the U.S. across international markets. Peach operates in 100 countries and handles some of the world’s most recognized brands. The relationship will allow both companies to reach destinations globally. James Carpenter, President of Peach North America says, “Our collaboration with Comcast Technology Solutions provides customers with a true, complete global video solution. We are excited to work together to change the way ads are managed and distributed worldwide.”Marketing Technology News: MRC Continues DoubleVerify’s Accreditation for Desktop, Mobile Web & In-App Impressions, SIVT Traffic Filtration & Viewabiliylast_img read more

Experience Management Leader Medallia to Acquire Behavioral Analytics Startup Cooladata

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first_imgAcquisition Enables Acceleration of Medallia’s Predictive Journey CapabilityMedallia, Inc., the global leader in customer experience management, announced it has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Tel Aviv-headquartered Cooladata, a next generation cloud-based behavioral analytics platform.  Leveraging its proprietary big data platform and artificial intelligence engine, Cooladata can process huge datasets beyond customer surveys to analyze non-explicit feedback to derive and predict customer sentiment. This enables companies to pinpoint opportunities to grow revenue and improve profitability.“We have partnered with Cooladata for a year and absolutely love their technology and team,” said Krish Mantripragada, Chief Product Officer of Medallia. “Our acquisition of Cooladata enables us to provide both a more complete view of the customer journey and the analytics to understand the underlying motivations required to make smarter decisions on how to improve experiences and grow customer loyalty.”Marketing Technology News: US Podcast Ad Revenues Hit Historic $479 Million in 2018, an Increase of 53% over Prior Year, According to IAB & PwC Research“We could not be more excited to be joining Medallia, the leader in the CX domain,” said Guy Greenberg, CEO of Cooladata. “We built Cooladata to enable brands to gain a complete view into consumer behavior and in-depth analysis of the consumer journey, and Medallia will help us accelerate that vision.”Marketing Technology News: With 87% Surge in Customer Bookings, Episerver Promotes Internally for CMOMedallia is the pioneer and market leader in Experience Management. Medallia’s award-winning SaaS platform, the Medallia Experience Cloud, leads the market in the understanding and management of experience for customers, employees and citizens. Medallia captures experience signals created on daily journeys in person, digital and IoT interactions and applies proprietary AI technology to reveal personalized and predictive insights that can drive action with tremendous business results. Using Medallia Experience Cloud, customers can reduce churn, turn detractors into promoters and buyers, and create in-the-moment cross-sell and up-sell opportunities, providing clear and potent returns on investment.Marketing Technology News: Box Maintains Aggressive Revenue Growth in Q1; Reveals Loyal Customers Continue to Drive Sales Experience Management Leader Medallia to Acquire Behavioral Analytics Startup Cooladata PRNewswireJune 5, 2019, 10:27 pmJune 5, 2019 Artificial IntelligenceCooladatacustomer experience managementGuy GreenbergMarketing Technology NewsMedalliaNews Previous ArticleMedia Monetisation Worth over £1.7Bn in Unrealised Potential to UK’s RetailersNext ArticleCognitiveScale Expands Relationship with Microsoft through Deeper Product Integrationlast_img read more

Destiny 2 Doesnt Currently Run on Ryzen 3000 CPUs but a Fix

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first_img The Very Latest On A Possible ‘Kill Bill Vol. 3’ Facebook Twitter Linkedin Pinterest Google Plus Reddit Hacker News Flipboard Email Copy 2shares This site may earn affiliate commissions from the links on this page. Terms of use. You Might Also LikePowered By ZergNet 4 Comments Things Only Adults Notice in ‘ThunderCats’ The Tragedy of Marie Osmond Just Keeps Getting Sadder and Sadder Destiny 2 Doesn’t Currently Run on Ryzen 3000 CPUs, but a Fix Is Coming Maisie Williams’ Transformation is Turning Heads By Joel Hruska on July 15, 2019 at 4:18 pm Why Billy Hargrove from ‘Stranger Things’ Looks So Familiar If you’re a Ryzen 3000 owner (or planning to be in the near future), be advised — Bungie’s popular Destiny 2 MMO doesn’t currently run on AMD’s latest CPU. It’s not clear why this is currently the case, but according to the developer, a fix is on the way. It will, however, require a motherboard update to resolve.AMD has identified the issue impacting the ability to run Destiny 2 on Ryzen 3000 processors and have implemented a BIOS fix that has been distributed to partners. In the coming days, players will be able to download the updated BIOS from their motherboard providers.— Bungie Help (@BungieHelp) July 12, 2019The problem cropped up a few days ago when Ryzen 3000 early upgraders found they couldn’t run the game. A week ago, Redditor Trinsikk posted:Destiny does not work on pc with the new Ryzen 3000 series Cpu’s. After clicking the play button on battlenet it says the game is running and the destiny 2 exe will show up in task manager but only shows that its using 5-10% cpu but it never will start. A couple threads have popped up on the bungie forums and it seems to be affecting all variants of motherboard /ryzen 3000 setups. Tried reinstalling windows 3 times over with full formats between and reinstalling drivers each time. Bungie halp.It’s not unusual for a new platform to have a few bugs that need to be shaken out, but this is a bit unusual — we don’t recall the last time a UEFI update was required to shake the bugs out of a specific game. In this case, there may be an issue with how Rdrand instructions are being issued on AMD processors. According to Michael Larabel, there’s some evidence of Linux hiccups on the new AMD CPUs as well, and the new CPUs are having some issue booting certain Linux distributions. It seems possible that the issues are related. If so, motherboard updates should resolve the issue.AGESA updates have been demonstrated to improve both the performance and compatibility of Ryzen CPUs in the past. When Ryzen first launched, AMD noted that gaming performance and overall compatibility would both improve over time. This was indeed the case — our initial Gigabyte board that we tested back in 2017 was unable to boot Linux until later updates solved the problem, and the overall performance of first-gen Ryzen indeed improved over time. When we revisited the CPU’s performance later in 2017, we found it had picked up speed in multiple benchmarks.The situation with X570 has been much better; AMD’s overall single-threaded performance is stronger now with the Ryzen 3000 family than it was when first-gen debuted, but there are obviously a few compatibility hiccups still to be addressed. If you’re a Destiny 2 player, watch your motherboard vendor support page for updates.Now Read:AMD’s Ryzen 7 3700X and Ryzen 9 3900X Reviewed: Red Storm RyzenNew Leak: Intel 10-Core Comet Lake CPUs Will Counterattack Ryzen 3000 FamilyIs Moore’s Law Alive, Dead, or Pining for the Fjords? Even Experts Disagree Jim Carrey’s Tragic Life Just Gets Sadder and Sadder Anna Kendrick’s Transformation is Turning Heads Awesome ‘Star Trek’ Projects We Never Got To See Tagged In amdintelgamingcpuslinuxRyzenasusgigabyteuefimsiRyzen 7 3700XbungiecompatibilityDestiny 2Ryzen 7 3900XRDRAND Post a Comment 4 Commentslast_img read more

The Best CPUs Ever Made

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first_img Anna Kendrick’s Transformation is Turning Heads Tagged In amdintelcpusibmbaniaspentium mCeleron 300AMOSbaeCore i7-2600KARM Cortex-A9Opteron 275Duron 600MOS 6502Intel Core 2 Quad Q6600best CPUsQualcomm Snapdragon 800 Post a Comment 26 Comments 26 Comments The Most Inappropriate Comic Book Characters Ever We’ve already covered the worst CPUs ever built, so it seemed time to flip around and talk about the best ones. The question, of course, is how do we define “best?”In order to qualify for this article, a CPU needed to do more than just introduce significant new features or support a new instruction set. The Pentium Pro, for example, was a very important chip. It pioneered features still in use today and demonstrated that out-of-order execution and micro-op translation were viable techniques for high-end, next-generation processors. At the same time, however, the Pentium Pro had issues. It was slow when running 16-bit code and its FPU performance was only about half of comparable RISC cores at the time. The Pentium Pro was a very important CPU core, in other words — but it doesn’t meet our criteria when making a list of the best CPU cores ever invented.To see which cores do measure up, check the slideshow below. We’ve taken a broad look at the industry over the past 40+ years, with mobile, server, and desktop CPUs all represented. Our selections were based on a variety of factors, including feature set, market impact, total strength of the product, and long-term performance.  Saying Goodbye to Johnny Depp Aggravating Things That Always Happen in ‘Apex Legends’ Facebook Twitter Linkedin Pinterest Google Plus Reddit Hacker News Flipboard Email Copy 0shares This site may earn affiliate commissions from the links on this page. Terms of use. J.K. Rowling Confirms a Hermione Theory We Suspected All Along Intel Celeron 300AThe Celeron 300A was one of the greatest enthusiast CPUs of all time. Overclockers quickly realized that the chip, which sold for $180, could regularly be overclocked to 450MHz. At that speed, it could match or outperform the Pentium II 450MHz, which sold for $655. Furthermore, when paired with the Abit BP6 dual-core motherboard, an enthusiast could run two CPU cores for less than the price of a single high-end Pentium II. Intel prevented this in later Celeron models and low bus speeds would handicap later chips, but the Celeron 300A was supremely well-positioned.<><>1234567891011 You Might Also LikePowered By ZergNet Popular Memes That Completely Destroyed Innocent Lives By Joel Hruska on July 22, 2019 at 7:40 am Honorable MentionsWriting a “Best CPUs” list means that inevitably, a lot of really good CPUs are going to get left off the list. CPUs like the Intel 8086 or Motorola 68000 are often regular staples of articles like this, because of how they transformed the computing industry (launching the IBM PC in one case, and launching the Macintosh as well as the Atari ST and Commodore Amiga in the other). We address many of Intel’s chips in more detail in our history of Intel products, parts one and two.Honorable mentions for great chips that didn’t quite make our list would include the original Intel 4004, Pentium Pro, Pentium III, Intel’s Pentium 4 Northwood, AMD’s original K7, and CPUs like the Core i7-8700K.Last, but not least, there’s AMD’s recent Ryzen launch. I didn’t want to try to pick a single CPU model to put in this list — third-generation Ryzen CPUs have only been on the market for a matter of weeks. But one of our criteria for CPUs is that the CPU needs to have transformed the market — and while we may not have a specific Ryzen model listed above, the family’s competitive standing has forced Intel to dramatically overhaul its product positioning. Prior to the launch of the Ryzen 7 1800X, an eight-core CPU from Intel would have cost over $1,000. Today, an eight-core Core i7-9700K is $365, while the 8-core / 16-thread Core i9-9900K runs ~$485 – $500.Given that market impact is one of our major criteria, we wanted to acknowledge Ryzen’s collective impact.Now Read: Is Moore’s Law Alive, Dead, or Pining for the Fjords? Even Experts DisagreeIntel Acknowledges It Was ‘Too Aggressive’ With Its 10nm PlansAMD Will Provide a Free Temporary UEFI Upgrade Kit for Ryzen 3000 Motherboard Updates The Most Unforgettable Harrison Ford Moments The Best CPUs Ever Made We Finally Understand Why Hollywood Dumped Christina Riccilast_img read more

Scientists Sorry Oumuamua Still Isnt an Alien Spaceship

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first_img Facebook Twitter Linkedin Pinterest Google Plus Reddit Hacker News Flipboard Email Copy 0shares This site may earn affiliate commissions from the links on this page. Terms of use. 10 Scientifically Proven Side Effects of Growing a Beard 25 Comments Ginny From ‘Harry Potter’ Is 28 and Unrecognizably Gorgeous Fans Are Absolutely Furious About That ‘Rise Of Skywalker’ Rumor Astronomers have been pondering the nature of our first interstellar visitor ever since its discovery. ‘Oumuamua is bizarre — not only is it from beyond the stars, but it’s also long and cigar-shaped. That led some to wonder if it wasn’t really an alien spacecraft, but past studies of ‘Oumuamua have suggested that it’s just a space rock. Now, a comprehensive analysis from scientists at the University of Maryland and other institutions has ruined our fun once and for all. ‘Oumuamua isn’t an alien spaceship. While there have no doubt been alien objects in our solar system before, ‘Oumuamua was the first one we ever spotted. Astronomers at the Pan-STARRS observatory identified ‘Oumuamua in October 2017, but it was already on its way out of the solar system at that point. Its incredible speed and orbital eccentricity meant it could not have come from inside the solar system, but it was moving too fast for anything to catch up and take a closer look. It didn’t take long after the discovery for people to start half-jokingly wondering if ‘Oumuamua was an alien ship. Even if we ignore that, it took scientists a few tries to properly identify the object. The initial assumption was that ‘Oumuamua had to be a comet because comets would be easier to eject from the edges of a solar system. However, scientists couldn’t see a cometary tail (or coma) on ‘Oumuamua. After labeling it an asteroid, further analysis of its trajectory found evidence of slight out-gassing. Astronomers finally decided ‘Oumuamua was likely a very old comet. ‘Oumuamua’s path through the solar system in 2017.So, why is it definitely not an alien spaceship with a fuel leak or something? The team behind the new study included experts from a variety of fields to create a “big-picture summary” of ‘Oumuamua. They began with its origins, showing that there are several possible mechanisms by which an object like ‘Oumuamua could end up in interstellar space. Its behavior in our solar system, while strange, is also explainable with natural origins. In fact, its path around the sun matches a prediction published by one of the study authors six months before ‘Oumuamua’s discovery. ‘Oumuamua is strange, but the study concludes there’s nothing unexplainable going on here. Jumping to the conclusion that it’s an alien spacecraft is fun, but the evidence does not support that. Astronomers hope to get a look at more alien visitors in the future. Upcoming instruments like the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will make it easier to spot small objects passing through the solar system. If we can find a few dozen alien space rocks, we might find that ‘Oumuamua is very typical of visitors from beyond the stars.Now read:Our First Interstellar Visitor May Have a Violent PastAstronomers Find Alien Asteroid Orbiting ‘the Wrong Way’ Near JupiterJapanese Probe Drops Off Robots on Asteroid’s Surface Feige May’ve Teased Clea For ‘The Multiverse of Madness’ ‘Black Widow’ Set Photos Reveal The Main Villain Tagged In sciencespaceastronomyasteroidsalienscometsOumuamua Post a Comment 25 Comments By Ryan Whitwam on July 2, 2019 at 1:01 pm Dani From ‘Girl Next Door’ is Absolutely Gorgeous Now at 36 Edward Furlong is Returning in ‘Terminator: Dark Fate’ Scientists: Sorry, ‘Oumuamua Still Isn’t an Alien Spaceship Jim Carrey’s Tragic Life Just Gets Sadder and Sadder You Might Also LikePowered By ZergNetlast_img read more