GAAs CPA have a cause but Fifa showed changes in sport are

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first_img By Tommy Martin GAA’s CPA have a cause but Fifa showed changes in sport are usually about the bottom line The CPA’s cause is right and fair, that alone doesn’t mean they will be successful, argues Tommy Martin. 9 Comments Jan 13th 2017, 3:02 PM Image: Ryan Byrne/INPHO Follow us: the42.ie Short URL Share4 Tweet Email 8,746 Views center_img Friday 13 Jan 2017, 3:02 PM http://the42.ie/3185183 GATHERED AT BALLYBODEN St.Enda’s GAA club on Monday to support the launch of the Club Players Association, an impressive cast of former inter-county figures put on an adaptation of Monty Python’s Four Yorkshiremen sketch.“My club had to play three championship matches in a week!” said one.“That’s nothing,” scoffed another, “I know a club that won their county title and had to play in the provincial championship the next day!”“Luxury!” another may or may not have said.“Our club players are thrown into a shoe box at the bottom of a lake, then forced to eat gravel for breakfast, before lifting dumbbells in the gym for twenty-nine hours a day and when they come home the county manager kills them and dances on their grave singing Hallelujah!”*Shocked silence*The attendees ranged from wise greybeards such as Liam Griffin and Martin McHugh to sharp-suited young gunslingers like Anthony Moyles and Aaron Kernan, but the anecdotes about the lot of the humble club player all had the tone of the misery memoir.The life of the modern GAA foot soldier, with its pointless months of rainy drudgery, sounds like Angela’s Ashes on protein shakes.The point was made: enough is enough. The movers and shakers behind the CPA had a clear message – Fix the Fixtures! – and a clear target: the all-powerful inter-county scene of which many of them were once a part. Last Monday’s official launch of the GAA’s Club Players Association. Source: Ryan Byrne/INPHOSecretary and driving force Declan Brennan suggested the All-Ireland championships could be done and dusted by the August bank holiday, clearing the summer stage for the clubs.When the proposals of GAA director-general Paraic Duffy were put to him – involving a three week shortening of the inter-county season among other things – Brennan replied that they didn’t go far enough.Though not exactly on a war footing (the CPA have already held ‘positive’ talks with Duffy), there was a definite sense of mobilisation in the air.The worm had turned.And it’s hard to argue about the righteousness of their cause. Talking to Moyles after the press conference, he pointed out that the needs of 98% of the GAA’s membership are being cast aside to serve the 2%, which is patently unjust, even if it sounds pretty much like the way modern society is organised in general.Compressing the inter-county championships by almost two months would be great news indeed for club players, but might not be greeted with such enthusiasm by the GAA’s corporate sponsors and broadcast partners, who’d wonder why their brand exposure through the country’s biggest sporting property was being shrunk rather than grown.Nor would Croke Park decision-makers allow their sympathy for the grassroots to override the importance of their summertime juggernaut to the overall health of the association. Tipperary and Kilkenny faced off in last year’s All-Ireland senior hurling final Source: James Crombie/INPHOThe championships are the GAA’s engine, driving its financial performance and acting as its most visible presence on the sports marketing landscape. Folding up its big top just when soccer and rugby are pitching their tents would be bad business.While everyone seems in agreement that the CPA’s cause is right and fair, that alone doesn’t mean they will be successful.Martin Luther King once said “the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends towards justice,” but he wasn’t talking about sport. The arc of the sporting universe is also long, but normally it bends towards cash.Take events in Zurich this week. Not to suggest for a moment that a GAA Congress delegate would vote with the greed and self-interest of their Fifa equivalent (cough…), but the expansion of the World Cup is sporting capitalism in its purest form. Fifa President Gianni Infantino Source: Joe GiddensDo we need a 48-team World Cup? No. Would it make it a better sporting competition? No. Would it make lots of money, not just for Fifa’s coffers, but for those previously excluded corners of the football world who will now get a piece of the action? Yes.Deal done.Páraic Duffy doesn’t quite work off the same neo-Blatterist playbook as Gianni Infantino, but he knows how the world works. His plan to sort out the GAA’s fixtures and structures quagmire, to be put to Congress next month, is clever.There’s a nice juicy quarter-final group stage in the football championship to keep corporate Ireland happy. He’ll have another go at getting rid of replays, but the extra matches in the quarter-finals should please the bean counters at provincial and county level. GAA Director-General Páraic Duffy Source: Ryan Byrne/INPHOAnd to ease the plight of the poor, gravel-eating clubman, he’ll move the All-Ireland finals three weeks earlier.It’s not quite what the CPA want, but its as much as the GAA can afford. Whether you’re in Croke Park or Zurich, you’ve got to keep your eye on the bottom line.The42 is on Instagram! Tap the button below on your phone to follow us! Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article The new club players group was officially launched last Monday. ‘The whole energy of the game is dropping and falling away and it’s just sad to see’Why changing the date of the All-Ireland finals is key to helping club fixture chaos The new club players group was officially launched last Monday. Image: Ryan Byrne/INPHOlast_img read more

Words cannot express our appreciation Family of Martin McGuinness touched by support

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first_img By Sean Murray ‘Words cannot express our appreciation’: Family of Martin McGuinness touched by support His wife Bernie McGuinness said that “our hearts are broken” following his death earlier this week. Image: Brian Lawless PA Wire/PA Images Mar 26th 2017, 1:11 PM Image: Brian Lawless PA Wire/PA Images Short URL Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article THE FAMILY OF Martin McGuinness have issued a statement to express their gratitude to all those who’ve sent messages of condolences and support after the political leader died earlier this week.The family sought to thank mourners who lined the streets of DerryHis wife Bernie said that despite Martin frequently being away due to his political activism, he was “a proud family man who took great delight in the accomplishments of our children and grandchildren”.The former Deputy First Minister of Northern Ireland died on Tuesday. He’d been diagnosed with a genetic heart condition several months before.Tributes poured in for McGuinness from across political spectrums, with former President Bill Clinton among the mourners at his funeral in his birthplace of Derry on Thursday.Sinn Féin released a statement on behalf of Bernie McGuinness today where she expressed the family’s gratitude at the support they’ve received in recent days.She said: “On my own behalf and Martin’s family, I want to thank all of those who have offered their condolences since Martin’s death, including the countless people who sent messages, mass cards and prayers.I also want to express our deep appreciation of the many thousands of people who attended vigils in the course of the week in many parts of Ireland and overseas.The doctors and nurses who looked after him during his illness were acknowledged, as were the many thousands who lined the streets of Derry for the funeral on Thursday.She also thanked his Sinn Féin colleagues, “especially here in Derry”, the many stewards, the friends who travelled from overseas, and particularly those who attended of participated in the funeral service in Long Tower Church. She added:Words cannot express our appreciation at the outpouring of love and solidarity, which embraced us throughout Thursday.McGuinness’s widow added that both she and her entire family had been touched by the efforts of so many to “provide solace and comfort throughout this very difficult period”.Despite being a “republican activist for all of his adult life”, which frequently took him away from his home and family, he was “a proud family man who took great delight in the accomplishments of our children and grandchildren”, she said.He loved his family. And we love him. Our hearts are broken.Read: Love and respect as Martin McGuinness made his final journey through the town that loved him so wellRead: ‘Ireland lost a hero. Derry lost a son’ – Adams gives graveside oration for McGuinness Share464 Tweet Email Sunday 26 Mar 2017, 1:11 PM 12,821 Views 70 Comments http://jrnl.ie/3307422 last_img read more

Michael Jacksons nephew defends his uncle ahead of documentary on alleged abuse

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first_img Image: Yui Mok Share6 Tweet Email Short URL It wasn’t only boys, it was girls, it was cousins, it was everyone… but also my uncle would give them the bed and he’d sleep on the floor. I know what it sounds like, I’m not oblivious to what it sounds like.Meanwhile, protesters gathered outside Channel 4 offices to protest against the documentary being aired and to show their support for the pop icon. 48 Comments Mar 6th 2019, 5:04 PM Wednesday 6 Mar 2019, 5:04 PM Michael Jackson fans stage a protest outside the headquarters of Channel 4. Image: Yui Mok Michael Jackson fans stage a protest outside the headquarters of Channel 4. Source: mjc/Twitter https://jrnl.ie/4527191 MICHAEL JACKSON’S NEPHEW has reiterated his support for the pop icon, hours before a controversial Channel 4 documentary is to air outlining allegations of sexual abuse against Michael Jackson.Taj Jackson, a spokesperson for the Jackson family, spoke to RTÉ’s Today with Sean O’Rourke show about Leaving Neverland, where two men Wade Robson (36) and James Safechuck (41) outline the abuse they allege to have been subjected to.He said that he believes his uncle is innocent, and accused Robson and Safechuck of making false accusations for money.“You know your family, I spent thousands of hours with my uncle Michael… I wouldn’t have flown to the UK to defend him if I thought for one instant that he was guilty.” Source: Sky News/YouTubeOn sleepovers in Jackson’s home, Taj Jackson expanded on the phrase used was “shared a bed”. By Gráinne Ní Aodha About the documentaryThe first part of Leaving Neverland, a four-hour film by British director Dan Reed, will air tonight on Channel 4 at 9pm; the second part will air tomorrow at the same time. US cable network HBO will air it in two parts, starting Sunday.The testimonies by the two men is reported to be quite harrowing and detailed, so much so that counseling was made available at its Sundance Film Festival premiere in January.Both allege that Jackson wooed them: claiming he invited them into his “fairytale existence”, gained their families’ trust and manipulated them into keeping their sexual relations secret.Reed said he tried to include “sexual detail in a very measured way, so it wasn’t done for shock value.”“We tried to make it graphic enough to be eye-opening and for people to be confronted with what it means for a little child to be seduced and raped by an adult pedophile,” Reed told AFP.“Of course it’s shocking. It’s a very serious crime. And it shouldn’t be glossed over.”It’s not the first public airing of abuse claims against Jackson but the release marks the scandal’s first major explosion since his fatal overdose at age 50, almost 10 years ago.With reporting from © AFP 2019. You can listen to the RTÉ interview in full here.  23,487 Views Michael Jackson’s nephew defends his uncle ahead of documentary on alleged abuse The first part of Leaving Neverland airs on Channel 4 tonight at 9pm. Protest outside Channel 4 today about the fact the Leaving Neverland documentary (which accuses Michael Jackson of sexually assaulting children) is airing tonight. pic.twitter.com/6iim2GaTBH— mjc (@MC_squared_) March 6, 2019 Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

FAI workers call for explanation on Delaney rent payments while they endured

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first_img Short URL WORKERS AT THE Football Association of Ireland (FAI) who are members of Siptu have called for an explanation for why they had to endure pay cuts during a period where former CEO John Delaney reportedly had his rent paid for by the FAI.Yesterday, the Sunday Times reported that the association paid €3,000 a month for Delaney to rent in a property in Wicklow since 2016.That report came after Delaney stepped down as CEO of the FAI on Saturday following Ireland’s 1-0 victory over Gibraltar, following a week where the Times also reported that Delaney had given the FAI a €100,000 bridging loan. The FAI said that the outgoing CEO would be moving into the newly-created position of Executive Vice-President.In a statement this afternoon, Siptu sport sector organiser Denis Hynes said members were “particularly incensed” by reports concerning the rent payments.He said: “This was during a period when the organisation was claiming to be unable to restore the pay and conditions of employment of our members due to financial constraints. FAI employees were enduring reductions in salary of between 10% and 15% , which were implemented on what was meant to be a temporary basis in 2012.”Hynes said that Siptu workers at the FAI had to wait until January of this year until pay that was cut in 2012 was restored following “long and difficult negotiations”.“Our members are calling on the FAI to immediately make a statement on its exact financial arrangements with John Delaney,” he added. Share192 Tweet Email1 Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article No Comments Monday 25 Mar 2019, 1:41 PM FAI workers call for explanation on Delaney rent payments while they endured pay cuts Siptu said its members are “incensed” by the reports Delaney had his rent paid for by the FAI. Further, they demand that the Board explain its decision-making processes in deciding to reimburse its adequately paid CEO while at the same time stating that it could not find the monies to restore the earnings of workers who were dedicated to developing football in communities across the country.Delaney, along with other FAI delegates, is due to address an Oireachtas committee next month.Comments have been closedcenter_img By Sean Murray Image: Sam Boal/Rollingnews.ie Mar 25th 2019, 1:41 PM Image: Sam Boal/Rollingnews.ie https://jrnl.ie/4559696 43,676 Views last_img read more

Drinking alcohol during teenage years linked with stunted brain growth

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first_img Image: Shutterstock/Radu Bercan 12,718 Views Short URL By Ceimin Burke Apr 2nd 2019, 6:00 AM Drinking alcohol during teenage years linked with stunted brain growth Many teens start drinking just as their brains begin to undergo important developments. https://jrnl.ie/4571452 Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlecenter_img This is the age range when the brain is being fine-tuned to fit adult responsibilities. The question is, does alcohol exposure during this age range alter the lifetime learning ability of individuals?The scientists hope their data will spark further research into how brains develop during adolescence and whether drinking during this time makes a person more susceptible to alcohol issues later in life. Image: Shutterstock/Radu Bercan DRINKING DURING ADOLESCENCE and early adulthood can slow down brain development, according to researchers who studied alcohol’s effects on monkeys.The brain undergoes crucial developments as we transition from adolescence to adulthood, right as many people start drinking for the first time.The authors of fresh research published in the journal eNeuro tried to determine what alcohol does to brains of teens by examining its effects on 71 rhesus macaque monkeys who were given unrestricted access to booze.The paper found that heavy alcohol use reduced the rate of brain growth by an alarming amount, 0.25 millilitres per year for every gram of alcohol consumed per kilogram of body weight to be exact. This is roughly equivalent to four beers per day.The strictly controlled experiment saw the scientists precisely measure the monkeys drinking and diet as well as their daily activities. This ruled out other factors that have undermined similar studies involving people.“Human studies are based on self-reporting of underage drinkers,” one of the study’s authors, Christopher Kroenke, Ph.D., explained. “Our measures pinpoint alcohol drinking with the impaired brain growth.” Figures from Alcohol Action Ireland show that 64% of 13 to 17 years olds have tried alcohol and nearly half of those go drinking every month.Commenting on the potential harm of teenage drinking the study’s lead author, Dr Tatiana Shnitko, said:  Share185 Tweet Email9 Tuesday 2 Apr 2019, 6:00 AM 19 Comments last_img read more

Ireland achieve highestever points total in latest World Rugby rankings

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first_imgLeinster sign three Ireland U20 players up as part of academy intake for 2018/19What next for Ireland? Schmidt’s men don’t want to be ‘one-hit wonders’ Follow us: the42.ie 65,978 Views Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Monday 25 Jun 2018, 5:09 PM Share397 Tweet Email5 A REMARKABLE SEASON which scaled rarefied heights ends with another notable achievement, as Joe Schmidt’s Ireland achieve a highest-ever points total in the latest World Rugby rankings. Ireland celebrate their series win in Sydney. Source: Dan Sheridan/INPHOIn winning 10 of their 11 Test matches over the course of last season, Ireland accumulated a Triple Crown, Grand Slam, Six Nations title and, most recently, a landmark series victory in Australia for only the second time, and first since 1979.Schmidt’s side consolidated their position in second place of the rankings with Saturday’s series-clinching victory over the Wallabies in Sydney, while passing the 90-point mark for the first time.Ireland began the campaign in fourth place on 85.39 rating points but memorable wins at the Stade de France and Twickenham en route to Grand Slam glory saw them hit a rankings high of second for the first time since August 2015.New Zealand remain the number one ranked team in the world but Ireland closed the gap at the summit, the All Blacks’ advantage now just 3.87 points after the summer Test series.Steve Hansen’s side defeated France 3-0 but gained no further reward, while England moved up to fourth place in the rankings after avoiding a series whitewash to South Africa with victory at Newlands on Saturday.Despite their overall series win, Rassie Erasmus’ South Africa slip one place to sixth with the Wallabies sandwiched between the Springboks and England in fifth. Wales are in third position.Meanwhile, Scotland made up some of the ground they lost following last week’s shock one-point loss to the USA with a convincing 44-15 win against Argentina in Resistencia.Gregor Townsend’s men remain in sixth position, with France, Fiji and Argentina making up the top 10.Ireland are next in action in November, when they begin their busy Autumn international schedule with a fixture against Conor O’Shea’s Italy in Soldier Field, Chicago.Argentina and USA then visit the Aviva Stadium in-between a much-anticipated renewal with the All Blacks in Dublin on Saturday 17 November. Source: World RugbyFull rankings available here>Originally published at 15.41The42 is on Instagram! Tap the button below on your phone to follow us! Short URL http://the42.ie/4090713 By Ryan Bailey 50 Comments Ireland achieve highest-ever points total in latest World Rugby rankings Joe Schmidt’s side won 10 of their 11 Tests last season. Jun 25th 2018, 3:32 PM last_img read more

Small businesses to lose jobs

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first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram Retailers, fast food chains and pharmacies may be forced to axe their staff or reduce hours if the ‘modernisation of award rates’ for employees goes ahead.The new award conditions, outlined by the Australian Industry Relations Commission (AIRC) are to come into effect from January 1, 2010 and will see retail and pharmacy employers pay higher penalty rates, such as double-time on Sundays instead of time-and-a-half as it is currently. “It is a bit of a blow to small business,” says Dora Tsolakis of Meli Market in Northcote to Neos Kosmos English Edition (NKEE). “Hopefully customer service doesn’t lack as employers can’t afford to keep people on and perhaps small business may consider closing doors on Sundays to avoid paying penalty rates.” The Pharmacy Guild of Australia national president Kos Sclavos predicts that this action will impose total wage increases of up to 22 per cent in the pharmacy sector and has called on Julia Gillard and the AIRC to make amendments to the legislation.He believes this issue will affect the Greek community, adding that eight per cent of pharmacies are owned by Greek Australians. “It is a tough fiscal environment so if there is an increase in wages we will be forced to sack people, reduce our trading hours or reduce our services,” he said. “The award rates need to reflect the industry- our trading hours are not normal. We call on Julia Gillard to extend her intervention to ensure that the high service sector and long trading hours of community pharmacy remain.”He referred to the letter that Julia Gillard sent last week to the AIRC with the request to treat restaurants, cafes and catering businesses separately from hotels as part of its overhaul of industrial awards. “Cafes and restaurants can increase their prices to make up for the wage increases but 70 per cent of pharmacy remuneration is from prescriptions in which we can’t change the prices.”Whilst the Government has encouraged the AIRC to use a five-year transition period with the aim of allowing businesses to absorb extra overtime payments, Sclavos also indicated that the union had called for the transition period to be reduced to under a year.last_img read more

Every Greek is an ambassador for Greece

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first_imgI am a Greek, who was born in Egypt and who migrated to Australia with my parents at age seven. I always had the strong sense that I am Greek and I have always been proud of that. It was mainly my parents who cultivated this love for my country from a young age, however, I believe that what also played a big role is the fact that we lived, and still live, far from our country of origin. This has created the need to become more connected with our culture. I grew up in Melbourne, studied psychology, became a psychologist, and now work in the field of Human Resources (Organisational Development) which specifically focuses on the development of strategic programs that increase employee effectiveness and which improve organisational performance. My hobby is music and my favourite instrument which I have been playing for ten years is the touberleki. I currently perform regularly at private and public events and I also teach drumming to Greek and non-Greek students of all ages. Who are the Greek ambassadors and how did this group begin? What has been particularly troubling me in recent times are the problems that Greece is facing. My dream would be to see Greece overcome these problems and one day return to her old glory. For several months, I have had many conversations with Greek Australian friends on how we as Greeks of abroad can help Greece in its current crisis. One night I had the vision that Every Greek is an Ambassador for Greece, and that we all have a role to play to help our country. So I decided to start the initiative Greek Ambassadors, with the aim of creating a sense of pride in every Greek for their country, regardless of their geographic location, and to encourage positive action for helping Greece. The initiative’s main purpose is to unite all Greeks, creating a network between Greeks in Greece and of the diaspora, encouraging action and discouraging apathy. The Greek Ambassadors will determine what the critical needs are and how we can work together more closely to deal with these difficulties, whilst also supporting our fellow countrymen who have lost their jobs, their wages and their self-esteem. While the first ambassadors formed in Melbourne, our group has expanded very quickly around world through facebook, reaching approximately one thousand five hundred members within only a few months. So far, we have explored some ideas and one of the activities we are planning is a fundraiser to support those who are suffering and most in need, through Greek charitable organisations. Our group also believes that it is important that we respond to negative portrayals of Greece in the media, and so far we have responded through making formal complaints against such reporting. How you can become a Greek Ambassador? Shortly, we will be announcing more details about our fundraiser and other activities, and we invite all Greeks of Australia to take part, as their success relies on the help of all of us. If you would like to join the group Greek Ambassadors you can contact us through facebook (Evy Yannas or Νικος Κολενδριανος), or via email eyannas@hotmail.com or changez@live.com.au. We all have the opportunity to be part of something special by becoming a Greek Ambassador. It is very important that we understand the tremendous power and potential that we have as Greeks. It is a fact that our population abroad is about the same as that in Greece. What other nationality can make that claim? We need to realise our potential and to unite through this common purpose. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

Philanthropic in our community give aid

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first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram Two Greek Australians, Brisbane doctor Paul Eliadis and Canberra developer Sotiria Liangis recently donated $1 million each to the University of Queensland and to the Canberra Hospital Foundation. Dr Paul Eliadis, Brisbane clinical haematologist, oncologist and patron of the arts, donated $1 million to the University of Queensland (UQ) to establish an academic Chair in Classics and Ancient History. Convinced that art, ancient history and the classics formed key elements of a well-rounded education, in one of his recent interviews the UQ graduate said that, in his opinion, Western universities that don’t have a department that teaches the classics don’t have a “birth certificate”. The University of Queensland is the state’s only tertiary institution to offer courses in history, culture, language and literature of Ancient Greece and Rome. A significant philanthropic donor in both art and medicine, Dr Eliadis’ assistance helped to establish high profile cancer clinics – Haematology and Oncology Clinics of Australia, now in their 25th year. On how he ended up studying medicine at University of Queensland, Dr Eliadis said it was his yiayia’s influence. “There are a lot of jokes about my grandmother and how she may or may not have influenced me, but she was always quite insistent that I was going to be a lawyer or a doctor. “I don’t know what it is about Greek families, but they want their children to get ahead and go to university, even though the parents have rarely seen the inside of a high school. “I ultimately decided on medicine because I felt it would be more absolute [than law], more scientific and not open to the whims of human beings. I was very wrong about that,” he said. The 60 year old medical specialist who is at the peak of his career, is in his Greek heritage that his interest in the classics originated from. “I am Australian, but my heritage is essentially Greek. The ancient Greek history is something Greek kids grow up with. I enjoy reading and I always find history, particularly the history of Greece and Rome, much more interesting than fiction. “The classics, in particular Greece and Rome, influence us all in Western civilisation no matter what you do. You can just walk through Brisbane and it is just there. The three main architectural forms of Greece are within a block, between City Hall and the Eternal Flame. I think the classics will always remain relevant as long as Western civilisation exists,” he indicated in the interview. Down south, in the national capital of Canberra, another Greek name made it in the philantrhropic news this month, when Sotiria Liangis, a Canberra property developer, pledged $1 million over five years to the Canberra Hospital Foundation. To date, Mrs Liangis donation alongside her son John has enabled the Centenary Hospital for Women and Children to create two special outdoor patient and families areas. The Therapeutic Courtyard is designed for children undergoing rehabilitation and treatment to experience it in a fun environment, while the Liangis Family Reflective Garden is intended for families to utilise if their baby or child is critically ill or has passed away. Names of Sotiria and her son John Liangis, are well known in the Canberra Greek community. Armed with an unprecedented support to worthy causes, Mrs Sotiria Liangis has supported the Greek community on many occasions. In the 1990s, the Greek community aged care centre was built as a result of collaboration between the ACT government and Liangis family. In 1996, the media-shy citizen of the ACT was honoured with the Medal of the Order of Australia for her service to the Greek community.last_img read more

People band together

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first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram It was only a day before Easter when a young Greek migrant family in Melbourne lost their mother and wife 34-year-old Athanasia Mazarakidou. But what has followed has been an outpouring of support from not only the Oakleigh Greek community but the community as a whole. “We were overwhelmed with the amount of money raised, and it’s not just Oakleigh, I’ve been getting calls from all over from people,” Angelo Sardellis, president of the Greek Orthodox Community of Oakleigh and Districts Incorporated tells Neos Kosmos.Athanasia and her family, husband Alexandros and young daughters Kalliope and Theodora arrived in Melbourne about 15 months ago and have struggled since coming here. But their troubles have been compounded by this awful tragedy. “We as a community – and together with our church – embraced to support them the best way possible,” says Mr Sardellis. “The community, and our priest banded together with the auxiliary bodies, association and our schools, to transfer the family to one of our units next to our church with subsided rental. “The funeral costs were covered and raised by the community and the parishioners, and we are now raising funds for the children’s education,” says Mr Sardellis, who says there is a bank account raising funds for the children. “It’s hard enough when people migrate to Australia, but then you hear of a young family struggling and then find out the young mother passed away leaving two young children with no mother – the moment I heard that I had to do something to help,” says John Rerakis, director, Philhellene restaurant in Melbourne’s Moonee Ponds. He was so taken aback by the story and said that he felt he “had to do something”. He’s organised a fundraiser dinner with all proceeds raised on the night going directly the family. The event will be held at Philhellene Provincial Greek Restaurant, 551-553 Mount Alexander Road, Moonee Ponds, on Thursday 15 May at 7.00 pm for $70 a head. “I see how many Greek kids come through our doors and ask for help and I see how hard it is first hand, and I think as a community we need to do more to help,” says Mr Rerakis. If you would like to donate to the family contact Angelo Sardellis on 0415 533 896 or if you would to attend the fundraising dinner contact Philhellene on (03) 9370 3303.last_img read more

Return to austerity

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first_imgGreece took a major step towards meeting its obligations in order to receive the agreed €86bn ($128bn) bailout, after its parliament passed a second set of reforms in the early hours of Thursday morning.Despite fears of a rebellion by SYRIZA MPs, in the end Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras gained the support he required easily, with 230 votes in favour and 63 against. Almost half the dissenting MPs were members of his own party.Unlike last week’s vote, this time around Yanis Varoufakis voted with the government; the former finance minister declaring that he felt it important “to protect the unity of SYRIZA” even though he believed the program agreed with the creditors was “designed to fail”.The reforms passed include changes to the banking system to protect savers’ deposits of less than €100,000 ($150,000) and the introduction of rules to ensure shareholders and creditors – not taxpayers – cover the costs of a failed bank.Meaures were also taken to overhaul the judiciary system.During the debate Mr Tsipras told the parliament once again that he was not happy with the measures that the lenders had imposed.“We chose a difficult compromise to avert the most extreme plans by the most extreme circles in Europe,” he told MPs, adding that the deal was the only way Greece could remain in the eurozone.Negotiations will now begin with the creditors on agreeing the detailed terms of the bailout. Due to be completed within a month, a likely scenario is that once concluded, the full agreement will usher in early elections.However major sticking points are still possible. The most contentious measures – including the phasing out early retirement and tax hikes for farmers – have been pushed back to August.Meanwhile Greeks this week faced a new era of austerity. They woke on Monday able to enter banks for the first time in weeks, but with Value Added Tax increased from 13 per cent to 23 per cent, the cost of the bailout deal was immediately felt in their pockets. Many everyday supermarket basics have increased in price. Services hit by the increase include restaurants and cafes, funeral parlours, taxis, and the much used tutorial schools – held precious by tens of thousands of parents trying to give their kids a better start in life.To get a sense of the mood across the country this week Neos Kosmos spoke to a handful of those affected.27-year-old Stav Balafas in Athens was shocked by price increases to the most basic necessities.“We’d get coffee and sparkling water every day for €4 and the next day we were surprised to pay €5. They listed coffee and sparkling water under luxury goods. Even tea is seen as luxury goods. No joke.“People are concerned about public transport tickets prices, taxis and petrol getting more expensive. Air, bus and even boat fares are up. The internet and phone calls got a top-up.”Valia Evangelatou (26) in Chios thinks the imposition of higher tax rates for virtually identical products is confusing.“Normal bread stays the same, bread with olives gets a hike. Normal milk stays the same, chocolate milk goes up. You need to have a masters degree in advanced economics to figure it all out,” said Ms Evangelatou.Despina Varsami (21) on holiday in Chania was bemused by the jump in price of that modest staple – the souvlaki.“I swore to eat one a day while I’m here. It used to be €1.80 and now it’s €2.30. I wonder if they taxed each ingredient separately!”Ilias Katrakis in Chalkidiki says the VAT hike will not get to the root of Greece’s economic problems but instead hit the poorest.“The increase will once again hurt the little man when we should be looking at tax evasion. “I say increase the VAT to 28 per cent for cash transactions but keep it at 18 per cent for card transactions. This will offer the incentive to move away from our outdated cash system, which is a huge part of the problem.”Kosta Karageorgiou in Mykonos echoed his sentiments. “People need to start paying taxes, yes, mainly the rich, but not on basic commodities and tourism. Tourism is what keeps this country alive and right now the prices are unappealing even to holiday makers from abroad.”Panagiota Stamou (26), a single mum living in Thessaloniki, sums up the mood of most Greeks who expected more from a government that vowed to fight austerity.“I’m struggling to make ends meet on a salary of just €400 a month. If the price of food, electricity and water goes up, but my wage stays the same there is absolutely no way I can survive, “says the 26-year-old Ms Stamou.“My child and I are already living on the absolute bare minimum. I didn’t vote SYRIZA for this. I voted for change. I voted ‘No’ This is far worse than anything I expected from them”. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

Nineteenyearold Greek Australian guitarist stuns Keith Urban on stage

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first_imgIt was definitely an unforgettable moment for Greek Australian teenager Ellen Tefanis when she shared the stage for a wicked guitar duet with country musician Keith Urban, during his Ripcord World Tour concert in Brisbane on Saturday December 17, 2016. Ellen Tefanis, originally from the country town of Port Pirie, South Australia, has been playing the electric guitar since the age of eight, but never in her wildest dreams did she envisage she would find herself on stage jamming with the talented New Zealand-born musician. “It was an amazing night and I felt privileged to share the stage with such a great musician and supportive person,” Ellen says in an interview with Neos Kosmos. It all started during a series of online Q&A sessions called ‘Ask Keith Urban’ prior to the concert date. The musician gave his fans the opportunity to ask him various questions and get his responses during the hour he was online. The 19-year-old took to Twitter and posted a video of herself performing a guitar version of one of Urban’s songs, asking the superstar if she could play with him at his Brisbane concert. After uploading the video, the multiple Grammy and ARIA award-winner extended an invitation to the young musician to join him on stage at his concert. “You play great and you said you were coming to my Brisbane show on Saturday and would love to play with me. I would love to play with you. You play great, we’re going to have a blast. I’m looking forward to it,” he said in his Twitter video. “Dad and I flew out early so I could attend the sound check with Keith and the band and rehearse the Boy Gets a Truck song, but we ended up performing Good Thing because it had more guitar work in it,” explains the aspiring guitarist, who went on stage with Urban at approximately 10.30 pm. “I had a blast and it was a dream come true. Keith is the most genuine person anyone will meet. He will give anyone a chance and he loves giving back. He is so thankful for his career and grateful for his fans.”Offstage, Ellen and Keith talked about many things, mostly about music, and when the show finished and the teenager walked backstage to say goodbye to Urban, he told her how good she was and how amazing their performance was.Ellen’s Greek grandparents migrated to Australia in the 1950s. Her Greek father George, who is also a musician, and mum Vivian, who is from an Italian background, own the local fruit and vegetable store in Port Pirie. “When I was really little I wanted to follow in my father’s footsteps and become a drummer, but the minute I picked up my first electric guitar, it won me over. “I knew it was the instrument for me, although there are limited resources when you live in a country town like Port Pirie,” explains Ellen, who has always had her family’s support in whatever she decided to do. “Even my yiayia and pappou were always supportive of my musical career and wanted to know what was happening in my music life. Unfortunately, they are not with us anymore,” says the young guitarist, who has also just completed her first year at Adelaide University, where she is studying a Bachelor of Arts/Teaching double degree specialising in history and music. Ellen plans to continue with both her music and teaching career, and doesn’t look like she is in any real hurry to decide which path to follow. “It really depends on what the future holds. If my music career doesn’t take off I will be more than happy as a teacher,” admits the talented teenager, who is still in awe over sharing the stage with superstar Keith Urban. “I am forever grateful to Keith and if I’ve learnt something from this experience, it’s that if you believe in yourself you can do anything.” To watch the full video of the two talented musicians jamming together, visit www://twitter.com/KeithUrban/status/809565779402182656 Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

Nursing home audit changes welcomed by Fronditha Care

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first_imgNursing homes are required to pass a thorough accreditation every three years, but are given three-months notice of the visit. That gives facilities the chance to get their paperwork in order, train or schedule more staff on the day and spruce up their homes.Aged Care Minister Ken Wyatt told the National Press Club on Wednesday the new measures were designed “to help ensure safe, quality care standards are maintained at all times.”Spot visits already exist in the industry, but are not as thorough as the usual three-year accreditation, which looks at 44 outcomes.Fronditha Care’s Thornbury facility in Melbourne’s north received a spot visit on Monday 24 October where the living environment, behaviour management, OH&S and infection control management policies and practices were assessed.Operations Manager Jim Scantsonihas said the nursing home very successfully passed its audit and was given lots of positive feedback by the assessors. Mr Scantsonihas thinks less notice forces nursing home operators to enact more permanent policies to maintain high standards. It is something he thinks is good for the industry and for the care loved ones receive in the facilities.“If we’re doing the right thing, as we always should be, we’re prepared any day of the week,” he said.His only reservation with the measure is being able to ensure enough staff is on duty so the facility can still run smoothly and residents won’t be adversely affected.“It takes a lot of time out of people’s day, particularly management staff that have to make information available to assessors and answer any requests,” Mr Scantsonihas said.“It leaves us a bit short staffed.”Fronditha Care’s CEO George Lekakis hopes the government would consider giving providers a short notice for rostering purposes to make personnel available over a two-day period for the accreditation process.Each of Fronditha Care’s five facilities have passed their six month spot visits this year, and are expecting their second visit shortly.Fronditha Care has passed every three-year accreditation since the company was established in 1977. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

Qatar Airways to launch new service direct to Thessaloniki

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first_imgThere’s good news for people who frequent northern Greece, with Qatar Airways launching direct flights to Thessaloniki. Commencing on 27 March, the Doha-based airline will be operating four weekly flights on an Airbus A320 aircraft, featuring 12 seats in Business Class and 132 seats in Economy.“Greece has always been one of our most in-demand destinations, and as such, we are delighted to offer our passengers a direct service to Thessaloniki, our second destination in Greece,” said Qatar Airways Group Chief Executive, Akbar Al Baker.“By adding Thessaloniki to our global network, we are pleased to offer our Greece-based passengers a gateway to more than 150 destinations worldwide through our hub, Hamad International Airport.”Qatar Airways currently operates three daily flights to Athens, providing more than 4,000 seats to the Greek capital per week, and with the addition of Thessaloniki will see this number increase to over 5,000.Despite being a relatively small city, Thessaloniki is home to a number of archaeological sites and historic structures, along with a thriving food scene, making the city a unique cultural experience.Doha – Thessaloniki Flight Schedule (Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday): · Doha (DOH) to Thessaloniki (SKG) QR205, departs: 7.40 am, arrives: 12.50· Thessaloniki (SKG) to Doha (DOH) to QR206, departs: 1.50 pm, arrives: 6:40 pm Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

Greeces student population in decline

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first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram A recently released report by the Foundation for Economic and Industrial Research (IOBE) documents an alarming reduction in Greece’s student population and highlights the estimated implications on the education sector overall if the downward trend is not reversed.Primary schools have recorded the largest drop over the last five years, with 102,000 students enrolled in 2017 compared to 108,500 in 2012, accounting for a decline of 6 per cent.Overall, the country’s total student population dropped from 1.49 to 1.44 million during the period 2009-2016, a development attributed to several factors, including a rapid decline in the country’s birthrates since the beginning of the financial crisis amounting approximately to 30 per cent.More specifically, births in the nation fell from 118,300 in 2008 to 88,500 in 2017, with the drop manifesting in a reduction in both kindergarten and elementary school enrollments.According to the IOBE study, a temporary reversal of the downward trend was observed in 2014, due to children born in 2008 – the last year of a mini-boom in births – transitioning to primary education.Experts behind the study estimate that at this rate the number of students will drop almost 30 per cent by 2035, with Greek schools accommodating for 423,000 less pupils than today.This could mean a reduction in school units by 30,8 per cent as well as teaching staff, with 70,000 to 80,000 less positions needed should the above scenario prove true.As for the impact on tertiary education, by 2035 the number of students admitted to universities would drop to 51,800 compared to 71,800 in 2008.It is worth noting that another study conducted by the National Center of Social Research (EKKE) in collaboration with a special parliamentary committee on demographics and social affairs highlighted the negative implications of Greece’s rapid ongoing population decline, associated partly with the low birthrate, on the country’s economy and welfare system.last_img read more

Free Nokia Siemens comme constructeur de réseau

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first_imgFree : Nokia Siemens comme constructeur de réseau ?France – Le quatrième opérateur mobile français Free serait en négociation avec Nokia Siemens pour la construction de son futur réseau. Le contrat avoisinerait les 200 millions d’euros.Après sa nomination en tant que quatrième opérateur mobile en France, Free est passé à une nouvelle étape cruciale : la construction de son réseau. Pour cela, Iliad est en négociation avec Nokia Siemens Network. Un accord préliminaire aurait même été signé. La prestation est évaluée à un peu plus de 200 millions d’euros. L’équipementier devra s’occuper du cœur du réseau alors qu’Alcatel-Lucent aurait été sollicité dans une moindre mesure. L’opérateur devrait pouvoir proposer ses premières offres commerciales dès 2012 (on parle d’un peu moins de 20 euros pour 3 heures de communication) alors que l’objectif de couverture de population est de 27%  pour atteindre 90% en 2018. Grâce à sa base de clients, Free espère conquérir 10 à 15% du marché mobile entre 2015 et 2020.Le 16 février 2010 à 11:24 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

Décodeurs TNT les constructeurs démentent les possibles dysfonctionnements

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first_imgDécodeurs TNT : les constructeurs démentent les possibles dysfonctionnementsFrance – Suite à la révélation de possibles problèmes techniques concernant les décodeurs TNT, les constructeurs ont tenu à démentir ces informations. Ces derniers affirment que leurs produits ne sont pas obsolètes.Cette semaine, Que Choisir avait révélé qu’entre 300.000 et 500.000 décodeurs pouvaient cesser de fonctionner suite à une actualisation des chaînes menée au printemps, actualisation nécessaire pour le passage à la télévision numérique. Chez les constructeurs, c’est la levée de boucliers : “Je n’ai jamais vu un décodeur, même chez les marques concurrentes qui, pour une quelconque raison, se met à ne plus recevoir certaines chaînes. Le pire qui puisse arriver, c’est que les chaînes ne soient plus accessibles au bon numéro”, expliquait ainsi un responsable de Metronic à nos confrères du site 01.net. Simavelec, entreprise regroupant des marques comme Panasonic, LG, Loewe, Philips, Samsung ou Sony, emboîte le pas : “Sur toutes les marques, qu’il s’agisse de modèles anciens ou récents, il n’y aura aucun problème. Cela fait longtemps que l’on a vérifié leur compatibilité.”Le 26 février 2010 à 12:39 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

Discovery la navette ne décollera pas avant le 17 décembre

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first_imgDiscovery : la navette ne décollera pas avant le 17 décembreCap Canaveral, Etats-Unis – Déjà reporté à plusieurs reprises suite à la découverte de fuites dues à des fissures, le lancement de la navette spatiale Discovery n’aura pas lieu début décembre comme l’espérait la Nasa. Selon l’Agence spatiale américaine, il n’y aura pas de tentative avant le 17 décembre.  “Clairement, nous ne sommes pas prêts pour un lancement dans la fenêtre de tir du 3 au 7 décembre”, a annoncé lors d’une conférence de presse John Shannon, le directeur du programme de la navette. Ce dernier précise que la Nasa envisage une possible tentative entre le 17 et 20 décembre prochains.À lire aussiApollo 11 : À quoi la conquête spatiale ressemblera-t-elle dans 50 ans ?Discovery devait décoller le 5 novembre dernier, pour effectuer avec à son bord six astronautes, son ultime vol vers la Station spatiale internationale (ISS). Mais une fuite d’hydrogène lors du remplissage du réservoir externe a conduit la Nasa à annuler le tir. Les techniciens de l’agence ont dans les jours qui ont suivi, découvert plusieurs fissures sur des soutiens en alliage d’aluminium de la navette, et tentent depuis de comprendre la gravité du problème, et de trouver un moyen de réparer ces craquelures. Un type de réparations qui n’a jamais été réalisé auparavant sur le pas de tir, mais seulement durant la construction en usine du réservoir.Alors que la Nasa espérait pouvoir tenter un lancement début décembre, la décision de reporter ce tir a été prise suite à une réunion du bureau de contrôle technique de l’agence. La prochaine réunion de ce groupe se tiendra le 2 décembre, et c’est là que sera confirmée ou non la tentative du 17 décembre.Le 25 novembre 2010 à 16:03 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

IRM en France trop de demandes pas assez de moyens

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first_imgIRM en France : trop de demandes, pas assez de moyensSuite à une enquête réalisée par l’association Imagerie Santé Avenir, sur le temps d’attente d’un Français pour avoir recours à une IRM, on constate que la France ne bénéficie pas d’assez d’appareils pour répondre à des demandes de plus en plus nombreuses. Et en matière de financement d’IRM, la France a pris un large retard sur le Plan cancer II, qui prévoit un rendez-vous dans les 10 jours après demande. Pour sa huitième enquête annuelle, l’association Imagerie Santé Avenir détient des chiffres peu encourageants quant à la bonne progression en France d’un service IRM plus efficace. Tandis qu’en 2010, le délai pour avoir recours à une IRM était d’environ 34 jours, en 2011, le délai moyen a seulement baissé de deux jours, soit 32 jours d’attente. Avec de tels chiffres, la France est loin de son objectif porté par le Plan cancer II, qui prévoit seulement 10 jours d’attente.À lire aussiL’IRM : à quoi ça sert, comment se passe un examen et quels sont les risques ?Par ailleurs, alors que la France prévoyait 12 appareils IRM par million d’habitants d’ici 2013, cette année, la métropole atteint difficilement les 10 appareils par million d’habitants. Un problème majeur, surtout lorsqu’on constate que chez nos voisins européens, la moyenne est de 17 appareils IRM par million d’habitants ! La solution pour limiter l’attente ? “Il faudrait doubler le nombre d’IRM pour arriver à une proportion voisine de celles de l’Italie et de l’Espagne, qui sont sans comparaison, avec celles de l’Allemagne et des pays scandinaves”, explique à l’AFP Jean-Pierre Pruvo, neuroradiologue au CHU de Lille et secrétaire général de la Société française de radiologie. Car, avec des délais d’attente trop longs, certains patients se retrouvent dans des situations à risques, des conditions inconcevables pour le neuroradiologue : “C’est injuste pour les patients. Cela occasionne une perte de chance et une inégalité des soins par rapport aux habitants des autres pays européens développés. Quand on a un cancer, une maladie neurologique ou cardiovasculaire, on a besoin d’un accès à l’IRM, et on ne l’a pas toujours. Pendant ce temps, les décisions thérapeutiques les plus efficaces ne peuvent pas être prises”.Un problème surtout financierLe problème à l’origine de ce manque de matériels est financier. Rappelons qu’une IRM coûte plus d’un million d’euros. Cela dit, la majorité des spécialistes refusent de qualifier cet achat comme un investissement “lourd”. Pour eux, il est rentable pour les raisons suivantes : “Dans un service de neurologie et de neurochirurgie, le prix de la journée d’hospitalisation varie entre 1.000 et 3.000 euros. (…) Au CHU de Lille, on a 400 lits de neuroscience qui coûtent près d’un million d’euros par jour, soit l’équivalent d’une IRM.”, confie le Pr Pruvo. Il est important également de souligner que le fait de pouvoir réaliser un diagnostic en urgence permet de pouvoir diagnostiquer plus rapidement une maladie et de proposer au plus vite le bon traitement. Une rapidité qui permettrait d’éviter certains coûts, comme des journées supplémentaires d’hospitalisation, des arrêts de travail injustifiés ou encore des déplacements médicalisés coûteux pour les patients ne disposant pas d’IRM près de chez eux. Car, il existe un second problème : une inégalité géographique. Aujourd’hui, en France, seules quatre régions disposent d’au moins 10 appareils IRM par million d’habitants. A savoir : le Nord-Pas-de-Calais et l’Ile-de-France (avec environ 12 appareils par million d’habitants et un délai de près de 20 jours), le Rhône-Alpes et la Champagne-Ardenne (avec un peu plus de 10 appareils par million d’habitants). Une quantité insuffisante mais nettement supérieure à d’autres régions moins bien “servies”, comme la Bourgogne, la Bretagne, la Corse et les Pays de la Loire, où il faut compter parfois deux mois d’attente pour un examen. Des inégalités régionales flagrantes qui, selon le Pr Pruvo, sont dues aux différentes politiques menées par les conseils régionaux. Le 15 mai 2011 à 11:38 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

Hillary Clinton lance une initiative mondiale contre certains polluants

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first_imgHillary Clinton lance une initiative mondiale contre certains polluants La secrétaire d’Etat américaine Hillary Clinton a annoncé jeudi la création d’une initiative mondiale visant à lutter contre le réchauffement de la planète. Alliés à plusieurs pays, les Etats-Unis entendent réduire les polluants à courte durée de vie, comme le méthane et la suie.Hillary Clinton a annoncé le 16 février le lancement d’une initiative mondiale pour lutter contre le réchauffement climatique. Alliés au Bangladesh, au Canada, au Mexique, à la Suède et au Ghana, les Etats-Unis ont crée une “Coalition pour le climat et la qualité de l’air” afin de trouver “des solutions contre les polluants à courte durée de vie” a expliqué la secrétaire d’Etat américaine.À lire aussiDengue : symptômes, traitement, prévention, où en est-on ?Ces polluants à courte durée de vie, tel le méthane et la suie, sont responsables de plus d’un tiers du réchauffement climatique. Les émissions de dioxyde de carbone (CO2), qui restent très longtemps dans l’atmosphère, y contribuent quant à elles pour moitié. Issus des gaz d’échappements des voitures comme des industries gazières et pétrolières, ils sont dangereux pour la santé humaine. Ils “détruisent chaque année des millions de tonnes de récolte et ont des effets ravageurs sur la santé. Des millions de personnes meurent chaque année en respirant la suie qui vient de leur fourneau, les gaz d’échappement des voitures diesel et des camions qui passent sur leurs routes”, a rappelé Hillary Clinton citée par l’AFP. Or, pour la secrétaire d’Etat américaine, “se concentrer sur les polluants à courte durée de vie présente un avantage : si nous pouvons les réduire de manière significative, nous aurons des effets sur notre climat à relativement court terme”, a-t-elle affirmé.Le 17 février 2012 à 19:30 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more